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an extension method on a collection named MeasurementCollection checks if the property Template.Frequency (Enum) of each item has the same value.

    public static bool IsQuantized(this MeasurementCollection items)
    {
        return  (from i in items 
                 select i.Template.Frequency)
                .Distinct()
                .Count()==1;

    }

edit info about underlying classes

    MeasurementCollection : ICollection<IMeasurement>

    IMeasurement 
    {
    IMeasurementTemplate Template { get; }        
    ......
    }

Is this a correct approach or is there an easier solution already in Linq? This method will be used intense in the application.

Have you got tips to take with me, back to the drawing board?

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1  
What's you're requirement is readability important? is speed important? what's the usual scenario. That they are the same or that they are not the same? –  Rune FS Sep 10 '10 at 19:21
1  
Based on the #arrays tag that you put on this question, may we assume that your MeasurementCollection object is stored as an array or ArrayList? Can we get a .Count from a MeasurementCollection without incurring much overhead? Which answer is correct will depend on knowing more about your underlying collection. –  StriplingWarrior Sep 10 '10 at 19:44
    
Why you don't want to add this method (with any implementation) into MeasurementCollection? Why are you use extension method for this? If this functionality is part of this particular abstraction show it explicitly. –  Sergey Teplyakov Sep 10 '10 at 20:40
    
@Sergey Template is a member of Measurement but not MeasurementCollection, only in the case of this method, both classes meet. by implementing this method inside the MeasurementCollection Class I would couple them forever and IMO create a fine mess. (sorry I cannot provide more code here ;) –  Caspar Kleijne Sep 10 '10 at 22:02

6 Answers 6

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Edit: to address Timwi's concerns about 3 enumerators:

bool same = <your default> ;
var first = items.FirstOrDefault();
if (first != null)  // assuming it's a class
{
   same = items.Skip(1).All(i => i.Template.Frequency == first.Template.Frequency); 
}

Which still uses 2 enumerators. Not an issue for the average List<>, but for a DB query it might pay to use the less readable:

bool same = <your default> ;
Item first = null;

foreach(var item in items)
{
    if (first == null)
    {
        first = item;
        same = true;
    }
    else
    {
        if (item.Template.Frequency != first.Template.Frequency)
        {
           same = false;
           break;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
you're code does not do the same comparison as OPs. He's comparing a property of a property. Yours is doing a ref comparison –  Rune FS Sep 10 '10 at 19:32
    
@Rune: I'll add that for completeness but it's not a fundamental difference. Unless some properties are null which would make it a mess. –  Henk Holterman Sep 10 '10 at 19:34
    
This is the same as the Trick #2 in my second answer. It instantiates two enumerators and evaluates the first item twice — and if you don’t want it to throw, you’d need a third to check for Any() first. This can be a performance problem if the collection is lazy and the first element takes a while to compute. –  Timwi Sep 10 '10 at 19:34
2  
@Timwi but on the upside this approach is a lot more readable since it can be written so that it almost reads as the requirements –  Rune FS Sep 10 '10 at 19:41
1  
@Henk: I think his problem is that, in your option1, you're comparing items of the collection directly (by ref), but in option 2, you're comparing items by item.Template.Frequency... If they're classes, your first solution will always say every item is unique (since they're different references) –  Reed Copsey Sep 10 '10 at 21:26

You could just find the first value and check if ANY others are different, this will avoid having to eval the whole collection (unless the single different value is the last one)

public static bool IsQuantized(this MeasurementCollection items)
{
    if(!items.Any())
        return false; //or true depending on your use case

    //might want to check that Template is not null, a bit a violation of level of demeter, but just an example
    var firstProp = item.First().Template.Frequency;

    return !items.Any(x=> x.Template.Frequency != firstProp);

}
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First of a general linq advise. If you just what to know if there's exactly one in a collection use Single() or SingleOrDefault(). Count will potentially iterate the entire collection which is more than you need since you can bail out if there's two.

public static bool IsQuantized(this MeasurementCollection items)
        {
            var first = items.FirstOrDefault();
            return first != null && items.Skip(1).All(i => first.Template.Frequency == i.Template.Frequency));
        }
share|improve this answer
    
Why the downvote? –  Rune FS Sep 10 '10 at 19:37
    
Not my -1 but your code seems like it wouldn't deal with an empty collection very well. And you were the perfectionist. –  Henk Holterman Sep 10 '10 at 20:10
    
@Henk you're right so I've updated my answer. I would however call it perfectionistic to comment on an implementation that in most case would yield an incorrect answer. Neither do I see how praising your general approach for it's readability is perfectionistic :) –  Rune FS Sep 10 '10 at 20:45
    
fails if the first item in the collection is null –  CodesInChaos Jul 1 '11 at 8:42

I got a bit of inspiration and thought about a solution with only speed in mind. This is really not that readable (which I usually preferre) but the characteristics when it comes to speed should be pretty good.

The worse case is the same for most of the other implementations O(n) but it's highly unlikely since it would require all the first half of the elements to be the equal and the second half to all be equal but not equal to the value in the first half. and would require the same number of comparisons as a linear search. In most other cases with the first odd one in a random place this will require half as many comparisons as the linear. In the case where the values are in pairs. So that item[0] == item[1] and item[2] == item[3] and item[0] != item[2] (and similar) then the linear search will be faster. In general with either random data or few odd once this should be faster than a linear search

public static bool AllSame<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source,
                              IEqualityComparer<T> comparer = null)
        {
            if (source == null)
                throw new ArgumentNullException("source cannot be null.", "source");

            if (comparer == null)
                comparer = EqualityComparer<T>.Default;
            var enumerator = source.GetEnumerator();

            return source.Zip(comparer);
        }

        private static bool Zip<T>(this IEnumerable<T> sequence, IEqualityComparer<T> comparer)
        {
            var result = new List<T>();
            var enumerator = sequence.GetEnumerator();
            while (enumerator.MoveNext())
            {
                var first = enumerator.Current;
                result.Add(enumerator.Current);
                if (enumerator.MoveNext())
                {
                    if (!comparer.Equals(first, enumerator.Current))
                    {
                       return false;
                    }
                }
                else
                {
                    break;
                }
            }
            return result.Count == 1 ? true : result.Zip(comparer);
        }

with out tail call optimization this uses extra memory (with a worst case of an amount of memory close to the amount of memory used for the original source). The call stack shouldn't get to deep though since no IEnumerable concrete implementations (at least that I'm aware of) can hold more than int.MaxValue elements. which would require a max of 31 recursions.

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It would be faster like this:

public static bool IsQuantized(this MeasurementCollection items)
{
    if(items == null || items.Count == 0)
       return true;

    var valueToCompare = items.First().Template.Frequency;

    return items.All(i => i.Template.Frequency == valueToCompare);
}

It will return false on the first item's template frequency that is different, while in your code, the algorithm passes the whole collection.

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This assumes that the collection is indexable. –  Timwi Sep 10 '10 at 19:33
    
There, fixed it! –  Ivan Ferić Sep 10 '10 at 19:45
    
The OP put an #arrays tag on this question, which may indicate that MeasurementCollection is implemented as an array or similar structure. –  StriplingWarrior Sep 10 '10 at 19:46
    
@Timwi: there is an [arrays] tag –  Henk Holterman Sep 10 '10 at 19:47
1  
① The edited version returns true when the input is null, thus masking a likely bug. It should throw ArgumentNullException instead. ② This still assumes that the collection has a Count. Admittedly, the name suggests that it does, but the question doesn’t state that, and the question asked about a solution in LINQ, which works with pure enumerables. –  Timwi Sep 11 '10 at 0:50

I've done it this way:

public static bool Same<TSource, TKey>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source, Func<TSource, TKey> keySelector)
    {
        var val = source.Select(keySelector).FirstOrDefault();

        return source.Select(keySelector).All(a => Object.Equals(a, val));
    }

Use:

ddlStatus.AppendDataBoundItems = true;
ddlStatus.Items.Add(new ListItem("<Mixed>", "-1"));
ddlStatus.DataSource = ctx.Status.OrderBy(s => s.AssetStatus).ToList();
ddlStatus.DataTextField = "AssetStatus";
ddlStatus.DataValueField = "id";
ddlStatus.SelectedValue = Assets.Same(a => a.AssetStatusID) ? Assets.FirstOrDefault().AssetStatusID.ToString() : "-1";
ddlStatus.DataBind();

This is a drop down box with a list of available statuses. The form edits multiple assets. The dropdown needs to know if the assets all have the same value or not. My Same extension does this.

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