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This is a sequel to a related post which asked the eternal question:

Can I have polymorphic containers with value semantics in C++?

The question was asked slightly incorrectly. It should have been more like:

Can I have STL containers of a base type stored by-value in which the elements exhibit polymorphic behavior?

If you are asking the question in terms of C++, the answer is "no." At some point, you will slice objects stored by-value.

Now I ask the question again, but strictly in terms of C++11. With the changes to the language and the standard libraries, is it now possible to store polymorphic objects by value in an STL container?

I'm well aware of the possibility of storing a smart pointer to the base class in the container -- this is not what I'm looking for, as I'm trying to construct objects on the stack without using new.

Consider if you will (from the linked post) as basic C++ example:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

class Parent
{
    public:
        Parent() : parent_mem(1) {}
        virtual void write() { cout << "Parent: " << parent_mem << endl; }
        int parent_mem;
};

class Child : public Parent
{
    public:
        Child() : child_mem(2) { parent_mem = 2; }
        void write() { cout << "Child: " << parent_mem << ", " << child_mem << endl; }

        int child_mem;
};

int main(int, char**)
{
    // I can have a polymorphic container with pointer semantics
    vector<Parent*> pointerVec;

    pointerVec.push_back(new Parent());
    pointerVec.push_back(new Child());

    pointerVec[0]->write();     
    pointerVec[1]->write();     

    // Output:
    //
    // Parent: 1
    // Child: 2, 2

    // But I can't do it with value semantics

    vector<Parent> valueVec;

    valueVec.push_back(Parent());
    valueVec.push_back(Child());        // gets turned into a Parent object :(

    valueVec[0].write();        
    valueVec[1].write();        

    // Output:
    // 
    // Parent: 1
    // Parent: 2

}
share|improve this question
2  
boost:ptr_vector should do what you want. –  Loki Astari Sep 10 '10 at 20:57
1  
Note that you can simulate value semantics (at least in terms of STL containers) with something like boost::ptr_container. –  Billy ONeal Sep 10 '10 at 20:57
    
@Martin: How dare you beat me by 15 seconds?!? –  Billy ONeal Sep 10 '10 at 20:57
    
@ Billy ONeal: You snooze you loose :-) –  Loki Astari Sep 10 '10 at 21:30
    
If you want polymorphism you have to have an indirection somewhere. You can use boost::ptr_vector or store std::unique_ptr<Base> in a vector or wrap a pointer to your base class in your own "handle class" (see "handle body idiom"). –  sellibitze Sep 11 '10 at 4:32

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Just for fun, based on James's comment about a template-based system, I came up with this Vector-like implementation. It's missing lots of features, and may be buggy, but it's a start!

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <boost/shared_ptr.hpp>

template <typename T>
class Vector
{
public:
    T &operator[] (int i) const { return p[i]->get(); }
    template <typename D>
    void push_back(D &x) { p.push_back(ptr_t(new DerivedNode<D>(x))); }

private:
    class Node
    {
    public:
        virtual T &get() = 0;
    };

    template <typename D>
    class DerivedNode : public Node
    {
    public:
        DerivedNode(D &x) : x(x) {}
        virtual D &get() { return x; }
    private:
        D x;
    };

    typedef boost::shared_ptr<Node> ptr_t;
    std::vector<ptr_t> p;
};

///////////////////////////////////////

class Parent
{
    public:
        Parent() : parent_mem(1) {}
        virtual void write() const { std::cout << "Parent: " << parent_mem << std::endl; }
        int parent_mem;
};

class Child : public Parent
{
    public:
        Child() : child_mem(2) { parent_mem = 2; }
        void write() const { std::cout << "Child: " << parent_mem << ", " << child_mem << std::endl; }

        int child_mem;
};


int main()
{
    Vector<Parent> v;

    v.push_back(Parent());
    v.push_back(Child());

    v[0].write();
    v[1].write();
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is close to the Adobe Source Libraries' poly classes. Nice! –  fbrereto Sep 10 '10 at 22:38
2  
you are reinventing the wheel: boost::ptr_vector does it better (no shared_ptr involved). Also note that the basic requirement was no new. With a new it's trivial (and there are libraries). –  Matthieu M. Sep 11 '10 at 8:01

You certainly can't have a polymorphic array (or vector). The requirement that the elements of an array be stored contiguously in memory is fundamentally incompatible with the fact that different derived class types may have different sizes.

None of the standard library containers allow for storing objects of different derived class types in a single container.

share|improve this answer
    
Even with e.g. list, the size problem still exists: how big should a node be? –  Oliver Charlesworth Sep 10 '10 at 20:40
1  
@Oli: Well, my first thought with that was that you could have a derived node class template that can be instantiated with different sized objects, which would require at least (a) a standard way to determine the size of the dynamic type of an object and (b) a standard way to clone an object. Even then, though, I think there would be issues with getting dynamic dispatch to work correctly. I don't think such a container would perform any better than a container of pointers, either. At best it would be messy; it might not be possible at all. It would be a fun project to play with, though. –  James McNellis Sep 10 '10 at 20:43
    
see my answer! I've taken your idea and run with it... comments welcome. –  Oliver Charlesworth Sep 10 '10 at 22:21

First of all, your requirements are still not perfectly clear. I will assume that you want "inline storage" for the container; so, for example, in a "polymorphic" vector, all elements would be adjacent in memory (with only padding in between as needed for correct alignment).

Now, it is possible if you're willing to provide an exhaustive list of all types that you're going to put into the container at compile-time. The most straightforward implementation would be to use a union of all possible types as the type of the backing array - that would ensure enough size and proper alignment, and same O(1) access by index, at the cost of some wasted space on elements of smaller-size types. I can go into this with more detail if you want.

If the list of types is now known in advance, or if you do not want that kind of overhead, then you'd have to maintain a separate index of pointers (or offsets from the beginning of the backing store) to elements, so that you can do O(1) access. Also, given the alignment issues, I'm not sure if you could even do that in fully portable C++03, though you definitely can in C++0x.

share|improve this answer
    
If your types have copy-constructors, etc., then you cannot put them into a union. –  Oliver Charlesworth Sep 10 '10 at 23:13
2  
True, though you can always use the same hack that boost::variant uses (or, for that matter, just use it directly). –  Pavel Minaev Sep 10 '10 at 23:49
1  
+1: std::vector< boost::variant<Base,Derived1,Derived2> > is the best answer I could come up with too. Note that the visitors of this structure need only return_type operator()(Base const&) since the others are convertible to Base. –  Matthieu M. Sep 11 '10 at 8:03

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