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How can I call the method of an object that has already been loaded in the JVM using reflection? I tried

Class myClass = Class.forName("myClass");
Method m = com.test.class.getDeclaredMethod("getValue",new Class[] {});
Object result = m.invoke(myClass,null);

but i get java.lang.IllegalArgumentException: object is not an instance of declaring class. The method I want to call is void i.e. does not take parameters

UPDATE I have an application that has already loaded a class "A". Another class "B" will be instantiated by a framework. When class "B" is initialized, class "A" has already been loaded in the JVM. I want to call a method from loaded instance of class "A" BUT without having a reference to "A" in class "B". In the answers, it seems I must create a new instance of "A" in class "B" but I want access to an already loaded object. If I create a new instance of "A" in "B" why would I want to use reflection? Am I missunderstanding something?

Thanks

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What is the object that has "already been loaded" - and how did you "load" it? –  Sanjay Manohar Sep 10 '10 at 21:16
    
Reflection is about finding out information about an Object, not finding an Object in memory. So if you want an instance of Class B to have access to an instance of Class A, you would have to give B a handle to it somehow. –  aperkins Sep 10 '10 at 21:52
    
@user384706, this is just a wild guess, but maybe the method you want to invoke should be a static (class) method, rather than an instance method? Also, in your update, you seem to be inconsistently using "class" and "instance". What you're describing doesn't make a lot of sense to me. –  Ladlestein Sep 14 '10 at 0:39
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5 Answers 5

You're passing the instance of Class as the first parameter to Method.invoke(..), but that's wrong; you want to pass the instance you're interested in.

result = m.invoke(myInstance, null);

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How do I find myInstance? It has been already been loaded in JVM and have no access to it from this class –  Cratylus Sep 10 '10 at 21:16
    
@user: You have to have access to the instance to invoke anything on it - you would need to pass it in or get a reference to it from somewhere. –  aperkins Sep 10 '10 at 21:17
    
If I have reference to the object, why would I need to use reflection? I want to call a method of an object that is already loaded in JVM from another object without having a reference to it –  Cratylus Sep 10 '10 at 21:19
    
@user, there are many reasons to use reflection (e.g. iterating through all methods, calling a method when you have the name as a string, etc.). However, calling an instance method still requires an instance. –  Matthew Flaschen Sep 10 '10 at 21:40
    
@Matthew: So what I am trying to do is not possible? –  Cratylus Sep 10 '10 at 21:43
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Instead of:

Object result = m.invoke(myClass, null);

You should be passing in an instance of myClass. The illegal argument exception is due to invoke getting an argument of type Class instead of type myClass:

Object result = m.invoke(myInstance, null);
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I think you need

Class myClass = myObject.GetClass();
Method m = com.test.class.getDeclaredMethod("getValue",new Class[] {});
Object result = m.invoke(myObject,null);
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If I have reference to the object, why would I need to use reflection? I want to call a method of an object that is already loaded in JVM from another object without having a reference to it.

Of course, you need a reference to invoke a method, you can use it like:

Object result = m.invoke(myClass.newInstance(),null);

But the life period of the instance matters depending on how you create it (normally or by reflection).

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The thing about invoke, is that you dont have to have the exact instance of the class in question, if the method being called doesn't require any instance variables of the parent class. In fact you can add the static modifier to the Method and just call invoke with null, null, Object[] which is the same as:

public void methLab(Method m){
  try{
    m.invoke(m.getDeclaringClass().newInstance(), new Object[0]);
  }catch(IllegalAccessException iae){
   // The method or parent class is declared private or protected
  }catch(IllegalArgumentException iae){
   // unsatisfied input parameters ( in this case, no params were passed) 
  }catch(InstantiationException ie){
   // could be several things  
  }catch(InvocationTargetException it){
   // Method specific, exception chain. call: it.getTargetException().
  }
}
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