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I am developing a Twitter application which references to the images directly from Twitter. How can I prevent animated gifs from being played?

Using window.stop() at the end of the page does not work for me in Firefox.

Is there a better JavaScript hack? Preferable this should work for all browsers

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If you have server side language at your disposal I think you better use server side code to take the first frame, store it on your server and show it instead.. –  Shadow Wizard Nov 25 '10 at 11:45
    
The problem is that there are 15 to 60 images from twitter to change. See jetwick.com (open source). –  Karussell Nov 25 '10 at 17:16
    
yeah but you only change it once so it shouldn't be a problem. –  Shadow Wizard Nov 27 '10 at 16:58

5 Answers 5

up vote 19 down vote accepted

This is not a cross browser solution but this worked in firefox and opera (not in ie8 :-/). Taken from here

[].slice.apply(document.images).filter(is_gif_image).map(freeze_gif);

function is_gif_image(i) {
    return /^(?!data:).*\.gif/i.test(i.src);
}

function freeze_gif(i) {
    var c = document.createElement('canvas');
    var w = c.width = i.width;
    var h = c.height = i.height;
    c.getContext('2d').drawImage(i, 0, 0, w, h);
    try {
        i.src = c.toDataURL("image/gif"); // if possible, retain all css aspects
    } catch(e) { // cross-domain -- mimic original with all its tag attributes
        for (var j = 0, a; a = i.attributes[j]; j++)
            c.setAttribute(a.name, a.value);
        i.parentNode.replaceChild(c, i);
    }
}
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1  
It's using HTML5 so as far as I can see, it should work on any browser supporting HTML5. According to this: deepbluesky.com/blog/-/browser-support-for-css3-and-html5_72 IE still does not support it. –  Shadow Wizard Nov 25 '10 at 11:59
    
thanks for pointing this out –  Karussell Nov 25 '10 at 17:23
3  
I think this would only work on local animated gifs as opposed to those hosted on a different domain –  donohoe Aug 19 '11 at 20:45
2  
Library based on this answer –  200_success Jun 20 '14 at 6:08
    
There is something wrong with the script, isn't it? If .drawImage doesn't fail with an error, there is no CORS problem and catch branch won't execute. If, however there is a CORS issue, the script ends and whole try/catch is not reached. Am I right? –  Tomáš Zato Jul 7 '14 at 21:49

Inspired by the answer of @Karussell I wrote Gifffer. Check it out here https://github.com/krasimir/gifffer

It automatically adds stop/play control on top of your Gif.

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This is a bit of a hack, but you could try loading the gif into an iframe and calling window.stop() from inside the iframe (on itself) once the image has loaded. This prevents the rest of the page from stopping.

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1  
will this slow down page rendering? –  Karussell Sep 10 '10 at 21:46
    
i don't think so, no. try it! –  Jason Sep 11 '10 at 0:51
    
Would you mind to give me a code example. I couldn't get it working with your method + see the update –  Karussell Nov 25 '10 at 11:38
    
calling window.stop() from inside the iframe will also stop the original window from being executed or how you would do this exactly? –  Karussell Nov 25 '10 at 11:52

Could try this...

var img = document.getElementById('animatedgif');
setInterval(function() { img.src = img.src; }, 1);

You could probably include an interval value of ~15 ms without seeing any animation for most gifs. Works in Chrome at least...

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I tried your method and also tried 15 instead of 1 but I couldn't get it working. Should this be called when body.onload is called. Or when? –  Karussell Nov 25 '10 at 11:42
2  
Ok. Was a stupid mistake. But the image flickers. This is not optimal –  Karussell Nov 25 '10 at 11:45

I an attempt to improve on Karussell's answer, this version should be cross-browser, freezes all images including those that have an incorrect file ending (e.g. automated image loading pages), and does not conflict with the function of the original image, allowing the original to be interacted with as if it were moving.

I would make it detect animation but that is much more intensive than just freezing them regardless.

function createElement(type, callback) {
    var element = document.createElement(type);

    callback(element);

    return element;
}

function freezeGif(img) {
    var width = img.width,
    height = img.height,
    canvas = createElement('canvas', function(clone) {
        clone.width = width;
        clone.height = height;
    }),
    attr,
    i = 0;

    var freeze = function() {
        canvas.getContext('2d').drawImage(img, 0, 0, width, height);

        for (i = 0; i < img.attributes.length; i++) {
            attr = img.attributes[i];

            if (attr.name !== '"') { // test for invalid attributes
                canvas.setAttribute(attr.name, attr.value);
            }
        }

        canvas.style.position = 'absolute';

        img.parentNode.insertBefore(canvas, img);
        img.style.opacity = 0;
    };

    if (img.complete) {
        freeze();
    } else {
        img.addEventListener('load', freeze, true);
    }
}

function freezeAllGifs() {
    return new Array().slice.apply(document.images).map(freezeGif);
}

freezeAllGifs();
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