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The following is some modelsim code:

 begin
    tb_in_top = 0;
    #5 tb_in_top = 4'b0000;#5 tb_in_top = 4'b0001;
    #5 tb_in_top = 4'b0010;#5 tb_in_top = 4'b0011;
    #5 tb_in_top = 4'b0100;#5 tb_in_top = 4'b0101;
    #5 tb_in_top = 4'b0110;#5 tb_in_top = 4'b0111;
    #5 tb_in_top = 4'b1000;#5 tb_in_top = 4'b1001;
    #5 tb_in_top = 4'b1010;#5 tb_in_top = 4'b1011;
    #5 tb_in_top = 4'b1100;#5 tb_in_top = 4'b1101;
    #5 tb_in_top = 4'b1110;#5 tb_in_top = 4'b1111;
    #100 $finish;
  end

What does the #5 and #100 represent? Are those line numbers? Is there something wrong with this code?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

It's not "ModelSim" code any more than something is "Visual Studio" code. It's Verilog.

The # token signifies a delay in nanoseconds.

So what this code means is:

  • At t = 0, set tb_in_top to all 0's.
  • At t = 5 ns, set tb_in_top to the 4-bit binary value 0000.
  • At t = 10 ns, set tb_in_top to the 4-bit binary value 0001.
  • At t = 15 ns, set tb_in_top to the 4-bit binary value 0010.
  • At t = 20 ns, set tb_in_top to the 4-bit binary value 0011.

(... keep counting up, incrementing tb_in_top by 1 every 5 ns ...)

  • At t = 80 ns, set tb_in_top to the 4-bit binary value 1111.
  • At t = 180 ns, end the simulation.

Yes, Verilog has for loops, and yes, that should be one.

Addendum

The for loop would look like:

integer index;
reg [3:0] tb_in_top;
begin
    tb_in_top = 0;
    for(index = 0; index < 16; index = index + 1)
    begin
        #5 tb_in_top = tb_in_top + 4'h1;
    end
    #100 $finish;
end

Finally, note that Verilog that uses the # time-delay operation cannot be synthesized to logic; it can only be used for simulation.

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If that's a for loop then how many times does it loop? –  node ninja Sep 10 '10 at 23:11
1  
It would loop 2^4 (16) times. Note that your original source has two statements per line of text. –  Mike DeSimone Sep 11 '10 at 1:13
1  
Excellent explanation. The time unit need not be nanoseconds. It is user-defined, and it is specified using the timescale compiler directive. –  toolic Sep 11 '10 at 18:19
    
How do you know how many times it loops? –  node ninja Sep 13 '10 at 6:21
    
By looking at the for loop declaration: for(index = 0; index < 16; index = index + 1). It works just like C. –  Mike DeSimone Sep 13 '10 at 6:35

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