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I'm writing some C and I have a lookup table of ints. I'm a little rusty... where do I declare and initialize the array so that I can use it in multiple C files? Can I declare it in an H file and initialize it in a C file?

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Is this question worth keeping up or should I delete it? –  M. Dudley Sep 11 '10 at 0:41
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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Globals should be declared in a .h file and should be declared as extern, and then they should be defined in a .c file. See What's the best way to declare and define global variables and functions? from the comp.lang.c FAQ.

For arrays, some extra care might be necessary. See Q1.24 from the comp.lang.c FAQ too.

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If I understand correctly, yes, you can do it. Read something about

extern static

keywords.

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Thanks, that's the hint I needed. –  M. Dudley Sep 11 '10 at 0:41
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I think the OP means "static" in a way, that doesn't correlate well with the meaning of the keyword static in the C language :). –  Maciej Hehl Sep 11 '10 at 0:45
    
i've posted both as they both refer to visibility of a variable in C language - extern scope to oher files or make it static in file it appears. –  Tomasz Kowalczyk Sep 11 '10 at 0:47
    
@emddudley - if it helped, please vote up ;] –  Tomasz Kowalczyk Sep 11 '10 at 0:47
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You define the array in one C file, and declare it as extern in another.

One common mistake is to equate the array with a pointer, and do something like:

// file1.c:
int array[] = { 1,2,3,4};

// file1.h:
extern int *array;

// file2.c:
#include "file1.h"

// use array

This will not work. You can treat the name of an array as a pointer in some situations, but this is not one of them. [Edit: The right thing to do is something like:

 // file1.h:
 extern int array[];
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But it works if you change extern int *array; to extern int array[];. –  R.. Sep 11 '10 at 14:34
    
@R: right -- now that you mention it, it probably isn't so good that my answer talks about what to avoid, but not how to do it right. –  Jerry Coffin Sep 11 '10 at 15:47
    
"so good" is a subjective thing, but if you didn't edit, you wouldn't get my upvote :) –  Maciej Hehl Sep 11 '10 at 16:00
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You can declare it in a header file with extern, and define it in one of your source files. However, by definition, it can't also be static.

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