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In the following method calls, what does the * and ** do for param2?

def foo(param1, *param2):
def bar(param1, **param2):
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9 Answers

up vote 304 down vote accepted

The *args and **kwargs is a common idiom to allow arbitrary number of arguments to functions as described in the section more on defining functions in the Python documentation.

The *args will give you all function parameters a list:

In [1]: def foo(*args):
   ...:     for a in args:
   ...:         print a
   ...:         
   ...:         

In [2]: foo(1)
1


In [4]: foo(1,2,3)
1
2
3

The **kwargs will give you all keyword arguments except for those corresponding to a formal parameter as a dictionary.

In [5]: def bar(**kwargs):
   ...:     for a in kwargs:
   ...:         print a, kwargs[a]
   ...:         
   ...:         

In [6]: bar(name="one", age=27)
age 27
name one

Both idioms can be mixed with normal arguments to allow a set of fixed and some variable arguments:

def foo(kind, *args, **kwargs):
   pass

An other usage of the *l idiom is to unpack argument lists when calling a function.

In [9]: def foo(bar, lee):
   ...:     print bar, lee
   ...:     
   ...:     

In [10]: l = [1,2]

In [11]: foo(*l)
1 2

In Python 3 it is possible to use *l on the left side of an assignment (Extended Iterable Unpacking):

first, *rest = [1,2,3,4]
first, *l, last = [1,2,3,4]
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You might want to mention that you can name them anything you want, the *, ** indicates whether its positional args or keyword args. ie. you could name them *foo and **bar. –  camflan Sep 27 '08 at 16:26
4  
You forgot the unpacking of keyword arguments ! –  PierreBdR Oct 8 '08 at 16:13
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It's also worth noting that you can use * and ** when calling functions as well. This is a shortcut that allows you to pass multiple arguments to a function directly using either a list/tuple or a dictionary. For example, if you have the following function:

def foo(x,y,z):
    print "x=" + str(x)
    print "y=" + str(y)
    print "z=" + str(z)

You can do things like:

>>> mylist = [1,2,3]
>>> foo(*mylist)
x=1
y=2
z=3

>>> mydict = {'x':4,'y':5,'z':6}
>>> foo(**mydict)
x=4
y=5
z=6
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It will also work with a tuple as parameter for the function. –  Rodrigo Jan 27 '09 at 22:34
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The single * means that there can be any number of extra positional arguments. foo() can be invoked like foo(1,2,3,4,5). In the body of foo() param2 is a sequence containing 2-5.

The double ** means there can be any number of extra named parameters. bar() can be invoked like bar(1, a=2, b=3). In the body of bar() param2 is a dictionary containing {'a':2, 'b':3 }

With the following code:

def foo(param1, *param2):
    print param1
    print param2

def bar(param1, **param2):
    print param1
    print param2

foo(1,2,3,4,5)
bar(1,a=2,b=3)

the output is

1
(2, 3, 4, 5)
1
{'a': 2, 'b': 3}
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Also, it's a good idea not to populate your interface signatures with these conventions. It's okay to use them for private implementations, but for a public API, they can often obscure meaning. They're basically advertising, "Hey, this function/method accepts anything!".

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The django public api for db, uses this a lot and is easy to use, but it helps a lot that it is well documented. –  Null303 Jan 27 '09 at 22:54
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Peter's answer is exceptional. I will only add that Python does not have function overloading like other languages, so to achieve the same effect, a programmer can use the *args and **kwargs conventions to allow the same function to be called with different inputs, similar to overloading.

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From the Python documentation:

If there are more positional arguments than there are formal parameter slots, a TypeError exception is raised, unless a formal parameter using the syntax "*identifier" is present; in this case, that formal parameter receives a tuple containing the excess positional arguments (or an empty tuple if there were no excess positional arguments).

If any keyword argument does not correspond to a formal parameter name, a TypeError exception is raised, unless a formal parameter using the syntax "**identifier" is present; in this case, that formal parameter receives a dictionary containing the excess keyword arguments (using the keywords as keys and the argument values as corresponding values), or a (new) empty dictionary if there were no excess keyword arguments.

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* and ** have special usage in the function argument list. * implies that the argument is a list and ** implies that the argument is a dictionary. This allows functions to take arbitrary number of arguments

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I second Zac, from a style and clarity point of view, using named function/method arguments is superior. If you use pyLint, it will yell at you whenever you get tempted by the dark-side of "* magic". That's not to say it's not necessary and/or useful, it's just that (in my opinion) it's rare it's the only answer to your problem.

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One fantastic step by step answer here, even a numpty like me can understand!

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