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In the following method calls, what does the * and ** do for param2?

def foo(param1, *param2):
def bar(param1, **param2):
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There's a new answer to this question with examples and demonstration of behavior here: stackoverflow.com/a/26365795/541136 –  Aaron Hall Dec 11 at 21:55

6 Answers 6

up vote 386 down vote accepted

The *args and **kwargs is a common idiom to allow arbitrary number of arguments to functions as described in the section more on defining functions in the Python documentation.

The *args will give you all function parameters as a list:

In [1]: def foo(*args):
   ...:     for a in args:
   ...:         print a
   ...:         
   ...:         

In [2]: foo(1)
1


In [4]: foo(1,2,3)
1
2
3

The **kwargs will give you all keyword arguments except for those corresponding to a formal parameter as a dictionary.

In [5]: def bar(**kwargs):
   ...:     for a in kwargs:
   ...:         print a, kwargs[a]
   ...:         
   ...:         

In [6]: bar(name="one", age=27)
age 27
name one

Both idioms can be mixed with normal arguments to allow a set of fixed and some variable arguments:

def foo(kind, *args, **kwargs):
   pass

An other usage of the *l idiom is to unpack argument lists when calling a function.

In [9]: def foo(bar, lee):
   ...:     print bar, lee
   ...:     
   ...:     

In [10]: l = [1,2]

In [11]: foo(*l)
1 2

In Python 3 it is possible to use *l on the left side of an assignment (Extended Iterable Unpacking):

first, *rest = [1,2,3,4]
first, *l, last = [1,2,3,4]
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21  
You might want to mention that you can name them anything you want, the *, ** indicates whether its positional args or keyword args. ie. you could name them *foo and **bar. –  camflan Sep 27 '08 at 16:26
6  
You forgot the unpacking of keyword arguments ! –  PierreBdR Oct 8 '08 at 16:13
    
they must add a way to upvote more than once! –  Abdelouahab Dec 3 at 22:21
    
Is the ** then a way of passing in a dictionary object into a function? –  Yan Yi Dec 17 at 17:07

It's also worth noting that you can use * and ** when calling functions as well. This is a shortcut that allows you to pass multiple arguments to a function directly using either a list/tuple or a dictionary. For example, if you have the following function:

def foo(x,y,z):
    print "x=" + str(x)
    print "y=" + str(y)
    print "z=" + str(z)

You can do things like:

>>> mylist = [1,2,3]
>>> foo(*mylist)
x=1
y=2
z=3

>>> mydict = {'x':1,'y':2,'z':3}
>>> foo(**mydict)
x=1
y=2
z=3

>>> mytuple = (1, 2, 3)
>>> foo(*mytuple)
x=1
y=2
z=3
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3  
It will also work with a tuple as parameter for the function. –  Rodrigo Jan 27 '09 at 22:34
3  
You can even do foo(**{'x':4,'y':5,'z':6}) ! –  achedeuzot Jul 29 at 9:46
    
Why doesn't print(*mylist) work in Python2.x? –  Pithikos Sep 17 at 10:11

The single * means that there can be any number of extra positional arguments. foo() can be invoked like foo(1,2,3,4,5). In the body of foo() param2 is a sequence containing 2-5.

The double ** means there can be any number of extra named parameters. bar() can be invoked like bar(1, a=2, b=3). In the body of bar() param2 is a dictionary containing {'a':2, 'b':3 }

With the following code:

def foo(param1, *param2):
    print param1
    print param2

def bar(param1, **param2):
    print param1
    print param2

foo(1,2,3,4,5)
bar(1,a=2,b=3)

the output is

1
(2, 3, 4, 5)
1
{'a': 2, 'b': 3}
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* and ** have special usage in the function argument list. * implies that the argument is a list and ** implies that the argument is a dictionary. This allows functions to take arbitrary number of arguments

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From the Python documentation:

If there are more positional arguments than there are formal parameter slots, a TypeError exception is raised, unless a formal parameter using the syntax "*identifier" is present; in this case, that formal parameter receives a tuple containing the excess positional arguments (or an empty tuple if there were no excess positional arguments).

If any keyword argument does not correspond to a formal parameter name, a TypeError exception is raised, unless a formal parameter using the syntax "**identifier" is present; in this case, that formal parameter receives a dictionary containing the excess keyword arguments (using the keywords as keys and the argument values as corresponding values), or a (new) empty dictionary if there were no excess keyword arguments.

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*args and **kwargs notation

*args (typically said "star-args") and **kwargs (stars can be implied by saying "kwargs", but be explicit with "double-star kwargs") are common idioms of Python for using the * and ** notation. These specific variable names aren't required (e.g. you could use *foos and **bars), but a departure from convention is likely to enrage your fellow Python coders.

We typically use these when we don't know what our function is going to receive or how many arguments we may be passing, and sometimes even when naming every variable separately would get very messy and redundant (but this is a case where usually explicit is better than implicit).

Example 1

The following function describes how they can be used, and demonstrates behavior. Note the named b argument will be consumed by the second positional argument before :

def foo(a, b=10, *args, **kwargs):
    '''
    this function takes required argument a, not required keyword argument b
    and any number of unknown positional arguments and keyword arguments after
    '''
    print('a is a required argument, and its value is {0}'.format(a))
    print('b not required, its default value is 10, actual value: {0}'.format(b))
    # we can inspect the unknown arguments we were passed:
    #  - args:
    print('args is of type {0} and length {1}'.format(type(args), len(args)))
    for arg in args:
        print('unknown arg: {0}'.format(arg))
    #  - kwargs:
    print('kwargs is of type {0} and length {1}'.format(type(kwargs),
                                                        len(kwargs)))
    for kw, arg in kwargs.items():
        print('unknown kwarg - kw: {0}, arg: {1}'.format(kw, arg))
    # But we don't have to know anything about them 
    # to pass them to other functions.
    print('Args or kwargs can be passed without knowing what they are.')
    # max can take two or more positional args: max(a, b, c...)
    print('e.g. max(a, b, *args) \n{0}'.format(
      max(a, b, *args))) 
    kweg = 'dict({0})'.format( # named args same as unknown kwargs
      ', '.join('{k}={v}'.format(k=k, v=v) 
                             for k, v in sorted(kwargs.items())))
    print('e.g. dict(**kwargs) (same as {kweg}) returns: \n{0}'.format(
      dict(**kwargs), kweg=kweg))

We can check the online help for the function's signature, with help(foo), which tells us

foo(a, b=10, *args, **kwargs)

Let's call this function with foo(1, 2, 3, 4, e=5, f=6, g=7)

which prints:

a is a required argument, and its value is 1
b not required, its default value is 10, actual value: 2
args is of type <type 'tuple'> and length 2
unknown arg: 3
unknown arg: 4
kwargs is of type <type 'dict'> and length 3
unknown kwarg - kw: e, arg: 5
unknown kwarg - kw: g, arg: 7
unknown kwarg - kw: f, arg: 6
Args or kwargs can be passed without knowing what they are.
e.g. max(a, b, *args) 
4
e.g. dict(**kwargs) (same as dict(e=5, f=6, g=7)) returns: 
{'e': 5, 'g': 7, 'f': 6}

Example 2

We can also call it using another function, into which we just provide a:

def bar(a):
    b, c, d, e, f = 2, 3, 4, 5, 6
    # dumping every local variable into foo as a keyword argument 
    # by expanding the locals dict:
    foo(**locals()) 

bar(100) prints:

a is a required argument, and its value is 100
b not required, its default value is 10, actual value: 2
args is of type <type 'tuple'> and length 0
kwargs is of type <type 'dict'> and length 4
unknown kwarg - kw: c, arg: 3
unknown kwarg - kw: e, arg: 5
unknown kwarg - kw: d, arg: 4
unknown kwarg - kw: f, arg: 6
Args or kwargs can be passed without knowing what they are.
e.g. max(a, b, *args) 
100
e.g. dict(**kwargs) (same as dict(c=3, d=4, e=5, f=6)) returns: 
{'c': 3, 'e': 5, 'd': 4, 'f': 6}

Example 3: practical usage in decorators

OK, so maybe we're not seeing the utility yet. So imagine you have several functions with redundant code before and/or after the differentiating code. The following named functions are just pseudo-code for illustrative purposes.

def foo(a, b, c, d=0, e=100):
    # imagine this is much more code than a simple function call
    preprocess() 
    differentiating_process_foo(a,b,c,d,e)
    # imagine this is much more code than a simple function call
    postprocess()

def bar(a, b, c=None, d=0, e=100, f=None):
    preprocess()
    differentiating_process_bar(a,b,c,d,e,f)
    postprocess()

def baz(a, b, c, d, e, f):
    ... and so on

We might be able to handle this differently, but we can certainly extract the redundancy with a decorator, and so our below example demonstrates how *args and **kwargs can be very useful:

def decorator(function):
    '''function to wrap other functions with a pre- and postprocess'''
    @functools.wraps(function) # applies module, name, and docstring to wrapper
    def wrapper(*args, **kwargs):
        # again, imagine this is complicated, but we only write it once!
        preprocess()
        function(*args, **kwargs)
        postprocess()
    return wrapper

And now every wrapped function can be written much more succinctly, as we've factored out the redundancy:

@decorator
def foo(a, b, c, d=0, e=100):
    differentiating_process_foo(a,b,c,d,e)

@decorator
def bar(a, b, c=None, d=0, e=100, f=None):
    differentiating_process_bar(a,b,c,d,e,f)

@decorator
def baz(a, b, c=None, d=0, e=100, f=None, g=None):
    differentiating_process_baz(a,b,c,d,e,f, g)

@decorator
def quux(a, b, c=None, d=0, e=100, f=None, g=None, h=None):
    differentiating_process_quux(a,b,c,d,e,f,g,h)

And by factoring out our code, which *args and **kwargs allows us to do, we reduce lines of code, improve readability and maintainability, and have sole canonical locations for the logic in our program. If we need to change any part of this structure, we have one place in which to make each change.

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