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I am attempting to declare a function outside of anonymous function but still have acess to all of the anonymous functions variables

Below is demonstrating what I'm talking about.

I just need to get rid of eval.

//Used to determine where the variable is being stored
var variableScope = "global";

(function(window){
        var variableScope = 'insideFunction',
        appearingToBeGlobalFunction = function(){
                alert("This Function appears Global but really isn't");
        };
        window["addFunction"]=function(funName,fun){
                //window[funName] = fun;  Doesn't work
                eval("window[funName]="+fun+";");
        }
})(window);

addFunction("alertTest",function(){
        alert(variableScope);
        appearingToBeGlobalFunction();
});

//should alert "insideFunction" and "This Function appears Global but really isn't"
alertTest();

Edit: The goal of this question was to ultimately keep the global scope clean from tons of variables, but still have the convenience of accessing, set and calling as if they were global. I have concluded there is a way to doing what I'm after but it requires a deprecated functionality in javascript. Here is some example code showing how to accomplish the above without eval. This article discusses how to use "with".

var variableScope = "global";

var customScope = {
        variableScope : 'insideFunction',
        appearingToBeGlobalFunction : function(){
                alert("This Function appears Global but really isn't");
        }
};

function alertTest(){
        with(customScope){
             alert(variableScope);
             appearingToBeGlobalFunction();
        }
};

//should alert "insideFunction" and "This Function appears Global but really isn't"
alertTest();​
share|improve this question
    
You have a local variable with the name "appearingToBeGlobalFunction"... that is a paradox. Why do you think that that the function that is assigned to that local variable should be global? It is local. –  Šime Vidas Sep 11 '10 at 16:39
    
@Šime Vidas: He did not use var to define that variable, therefore it's defined in the global context. It should be renamed to appearingToBeGlobalFunctionAndActuallyIs. –  Cristian Sanchez Sep 11 '10 at 16:49
    
Yes he did. Both "variableScope" and "appearing..." are local variables. (Notice the comma seperator between them). stackoverflow.com/questions/694102/… –  Šime Vidas Sep 11 '10 at 16:58
    
@Šime Vidas: You're right, sorry. That's why indentation is important people! I think the reason he added that appearingToBeGlobalFunction function with that name is because when called from the "outside" it appears to be a global function if you didn't know what he was trying to do. –  Cristian Sanchez Sep 11 '10 at 17:03
    
You have no idea good your question is. The entire internet is wrong. Binding this is not changing the scope of a function its setting a pointer(this) to an object to include into a functions scope. That scope is not changed or re bound at all period. –  James Andino Mar 8 '12 at 13:05

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can't get rid of eval and still expect it to work. That's the only way to take a look at members of the scope after it's been "closed." I've messed around with something similar in the past, but I would never actually use it anywhere. Consider an alternate solution to whatever you're trying to accomplish.

share|improve this answer
eval("window[funName]="+fun+";");

Oh dear Lord.

The reason this “works” is that you are converting the function fun (alertTest) into a string to put it in the eval argument.

It happens that in most desktop browsers, a native JS function's toString() result will be a string that looks like a function expression containing the same code as the original declaration. You're turning a function back into a string and re-parsing that string in the context of the new enclosing function, so the new function value is the same code but with a different closure.

However, it is not required that Function#toString work like this, and in some cases it won't. It is not safe to rely on function decomposition; avoid.

You can certainly only do this kind of horrific hackery using eval, although there is no reason the window[funName]= part has to be inside the eval. window[funName]= eval('('+fun+')'); would work equally well (badly).

I am attempting to declare a function outside of anonymous function but still have acess to all of the anonymous functions variables

Whyever would you do something crazy like that?

share|improve this answer

you could force the variables to be in the global scope eg instead of var variableScope = 'insideFunction' you use window.variableScope = 'insideFunction'

share|improve this answer
    
The solution should not be to introduce more global variables. –  Šime Vidas Sep 11 '10 at 16:34

Something like this?

<script type="text/javascript">
(function(window) {
    // create a scope we can reference:
    var scope = (function() {
        this.variableScope = 'insideFunction';
        this.appearingToBeGlobalFunction = function(){
            alert("This Function appears Global but really isn't");
        };
    })();
    window["addFunction"]=function(funName,fun){
        window[funName] = function() { fun.apply(scope, []); };
    }
})(window);

addFunction("alertTest",function(){
    alert(variableScope);
    appearingToBeGlobalFunction();
});

alertTest();

</script>
share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately the only reason this works is because this is bound to the global context. So you're defining those variables in the global context, not in the local context. That's why you can access them from addFunction on the outside. If you wanted to access the variables from the "scope", you would do this.variableScope. Also, you should change var scope = (function() { ... })() to var scope = new function() { ... }. –  Cristian Sanchez Sep 11 '10 at 17:08
    
new function() {}? Why the new operator? It is a function expression... –  Šime Vidas Sep 12 '10 at 1:13
    
Daniel is right. I would need to use new to create a new instance of the object. scope is not referencing the object, but the return value of the function. When it is executing this resolves to global, but with new this will resolve rightly to the current object. –  Brendon Sep 12 '10 at 11:56

The goal of this question was to ultimately keep the global scope clean from tons of variables, but still have the convenience of accessing, set and calling as if they were global. I have concluded there is a way to doing what I'm after but it requires a deprecated functionality in javascript. Here is some example code showing how to accomplish the above without eval. This article discusses how to use "with".

var variableScope = "global";

var customScope = {
        variableScope : 'insideFunction',
        appearingToBeGlobalFunction : function(){
                alert("This Function appears Global but really isn't");
        }
};

function alertTest(){
        with(customScope){
             alert(variableScope);
             appearingToBeGlobalFunction();
        }
};

//should alert "insideFunction" and "This Function appears Global but really isn't"
alertTest();​
share|improve this answer

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