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I was wondering if it was possible to find the median value of an array? For example, suppose I have an array of size nine. Would it possible to find the middle slot of this array?

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That should be quite trivial if you know anything about array handling. Note that unless the array is sorted, the middle slot is not the median. Is this homework? –  teukkam Sep 11 '10 at 17:35
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Java or C++? Pick one. And "median value" and "middle slot" aren't the same thing, pick one. –  GManNickG Sep 11 '10 at 17:44
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6 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Assuming the array x is sorted and is of length n:

If n is odd then the median is x[(n-1)/2].
If n is even than the median is ( x[n/2] + x[(n/2)-1] ) / 2.

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In C++, you can use std::nth_element; see http://cplusplus.com/reference/algorithm/nth_element/.

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In java :

int middleSlot = youArray.length/2;
yourArray[middleSlot];

or

yourArray[yourArray.length/2];

in one line.

That's possible because in java arrays have a fixed size.

Note : 3/2 == 1


Resources :

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Your answer is wrong. For example, consider an array with two elements: 3 and 75. Your answer gives the median as 75. –  Turtle Sep 11 '10 at 19:40
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What is the median of {3, 75}? –  Wouter Lievens Oct 11 '10 at 9:59
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The median of 3 and 75 is 39 –  Mason Oct 4 '11 at 4:54
    
Mason, you seem to be confusing median with average. –  Gal Mar 2 '13 at 23:02
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@Gal, based on definition of median, If the number of values is even, the median is the average of the two middle values. So Manson is right. –  Chris Li Apr 28 '13 at 5:14
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vector<int> v;
size_t len = v.size;
nth_element( v.begin(), v.begin()+len/2,v.end() );

int median = v[len/2];
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If you want to use any external library here is Apache commons math library using you can calculate the Median.
For more methods and use take look at the API documentation

import org.apache.commons.math3.*;
.....
......
........
//calculate median
public double getMedian(double[] values){
 Median median = new Median();
 double medianValue = median.evaluate(values);
 return medianValue;
}
.......

Calculate in program

Generally, median is calculated using the following two formulas given here

If n is odd then Median (M) = value of ((n + 1)/2)th item term.
If n is even then Median (M) = value of [((n)/2)th item term + ((n)/2 + 1)th item term ]/2

It is very easy as you have 9 elements (odd number).
Find the middle element of an array.
In your program you can declare array

//as you mentioned in question, you have array with 9 elements
int[] numArray = new int[9]; 

then you need to sort array using Arrays#sort

Arrays.sort(numArray);
int middle = numArray.length/2;
int medianValue = 0; //declare variable 
if (numArray.length%2 == 1) 
    medianValue = numArray[middle];
else
   medianValue = (numArray[middle-1] + numArray[middle]) / 2;
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The Java answer above only works if there are is an odd ammount of numbers here is the answer I got to the solution:

if (yourArray.length % 2 == 0){

     //this is for if your array has an even ammount of numbers
     double middleNumOne = yourArray[yourArray.length / 2 - 0.5]
     double middleNumTwo = yourArray[yourArray.length / 2 + 0.5]
     double median = (middleNumOne + middleNumTwo) / 2;
     System.out.print(median);

}else{

     //this is for if your array has an odd ammount of numbers
     System.out.print(yourArray[yourArray.length/2];);
}

And note that this is a proof of concept and off the fly. If you think that you can make it more compact or less intensive, go right ahead. Please don't criticize it.

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