Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to use HashSet to store objects of a class that I created, but apparently the same objects seem to have two different hashes, which is why the contains method does not realize that the object is already in the HashSet. This leads to my program running out of heap memory.

I don't think I'm doing anything wrong, but I wanted a second opinion anyway. I've done similar operations before which all worked fine, which makes this particularly annoying. I'd appreciate any help.

Here's my code

move1 = new Move(t,s);
if(move1.hashCode()==new Move(t,s).hashCode())
    System.out.println("match");
move2 = new Move(s,t);
moves.add(move1); 
moves.add(move2);
if(moves.contains(new Move(t,s)))
    System.out.println("match found");

Here's the Move class:

public class Move {
    private int move1;
    private int move2;

    Move(int m1, int m2)
    {
        move1 = m1;
        move2 = m2;
    }

    public String toString()
    {
         return String.valueOf(move1)+" "+String.valueOf(move2);
    }
}

Here's the output I get

Exception in thread "main" java.lang.OutOfMemoryError: Java heap space at java.util.HashMap.addEntry(HashMap.java:797) at java.util.HashMap.put(HashMap.java:431) at java.util.HashSet.add(HashSet.java:194) at makeMove.(makeMove.java:33)

share|improve this question
    
Retagged, since the exception is a side-effect of the problem. –  dty Sep 11 '10 at 20:48
add comment

3 Answers 3

up vote 13 down vote accepted

You need to override the Object#hashCode() method in the Move class to let it return the same hashCode() value for the state of the Move instance. Don't forget to override Object#equals() as well.

See also:


Hint: if you're using an IDE like Eclipse, you can also just autogenerate them. Rightclick somewhere the Move class, choose Source > Generate hashCode() and equals(). Here is how it look like then:

@Override
public int hashCode() {
    final int prime = 31;
    int result = 1;
    result = prime * result + move1;
    result = prime * result + move2;
    return result;
}

@Override
public boolean equals(Object obj) {
    if (this == obj)
        return true;
    if (obj == null)
        return false;
    if (getClass() != obj.getClass())
        return false;
    Move other = (Move) obj;
    if (move1 != other.move1)
        return false;
    if (move2 != other.move2)
        return false;
    return true;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the heads up. Especially for the Eclipse tip. –  efficiencyIsBliss Sep 11 '10 at 20:13
1  
This is all documented in the Javadoc for HashSet. That's what it's there for! –  dty Sep 11 '10 at 20:46
add comment

HashSet will determine equality based on calling hashCode() and equals(). You have not implemented these, so you'll inherite them from Object. The hashCode and equals methods of Object is just based on whether the references are equal.

That's why if(move1.hashCode()==new Move(t,s).hashCode()) is false. move1 is a different instance than the instance created by calling new Move(t,s).hashCode()

You'll need to implement hashCode and equals in your Move class.

e.g.(though perhaps non-optimal, and you might want a null safe equals - have your IDE generate them if it can)

public int hashCode() {
    return move1 ^ move2 +;
}

public boolean equals(Object o) {
  if(!other instanceof Move) 
      return false;

  Move other = (Move)o;

  return other.move1 == move1 && other.move2 == move2;
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

You have to override equals() and hasCode()

This may be an option.

import static java.lang.System.out;
public class Move {
    private int move1;
    private int move2;

    Move(int m1, int m2) {
        move1 = m1;
        move2 = m2;
    }

    public String toString() {
         return String.valueOf(move1)+" "+String.valueOf(move2);
    }

    public int hashCode() {
        return move1 * 31 + move2 * 31;
    }
    public boolean equals( Object other ) {
        if( this == other ) { return true; }
        if( other instanceof Move ) {
            Move m2 = ( Move ) other;
            return this.move1 == m2.move1 && this.move2 == m2.move2;
        }
        return false;
    }

    public static void main( String  [] args ) {
        out.println( new Move(2,3).equals( new Move(2,3)));
        out.println( new Move(1,1).hashCode() == new Move(1,1).hashCode()  );
    }
}

You have to define if the order of the move is relevant ( 1,2 isequals to 2,1 or not )

For more information:

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/27581/overriding-equals-and-hashcode-in-java

Item 8: always override hashCode when you override equals from: "Effective Java" http://bit.ly/cd7uUl

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.