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I noticed that the C# compiler generates a ret instruction at the end of void methods:

.method private hidebysig static void Main(string[] args) cil managed
{
    // method body
    L_0030: ret 
} 

I've written a compiler for .NET and it works regardless if I emit a ret statement or not (I've checked the generated IL and it's indeed not in there).

I just wonder: Is ret on methods returning void required for anything? It doesn't seem to do anything with the stack, so I believe it's completely unnecessary for void methods, but I'd like to hear from someone who knows a bit more about the CLR?

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(I assume the C# guys emit ret on void method becuase it makes their job easier: Only have one method-generator function in their compiler that is used for void and non-void methods and just always emit ret instead of checking if it's needed. I'm just guessing though) –  Michael Stum Sep 11 '10 at 22:35
    
you could use .NET reflector to see if it generates any different bytecode. My guess is absolutely not, because there is no reason for it to. The guess you mentioned in your comment look right, too. –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Sep 11 '10 at 22:39
    
@Merlyn No, it doesn't. If I don't emit ret, no ret is emitted in the IL. –  Michael Stum Sep 11 '10 at 22:47
5  
There has to be a ret according to ECMA-335 12.4, 6. Control is not permitted to simply “fall through” the end of a method. All paths shall terminate with one of these instructions: ret, throw, jmp, or (tail. followed by call, calli, or callvirt). –  Femaref Sep 11 '10 at 23:38
4  
If it works, it works by accident. An unverifiable program is allowed to have implementation-defined behaviour, and implementation-defined behaveiour includes working as you want it to. It's a better idea to use PEVERIFY to ensure that your code generator always generates verifiable code. –  Eric Lippert Sep 12 '10 at 15:43
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3 Answers 3

up vote 20 down vote accepted

According to the C# Standard (ECMA-334), a method is defined as the following:

A method is a member that implements a computation or action that can be performed by an object or class. Methods have a (possibly empty) list of formal parameters, a return value (unless the method’s return-type is void), and are either static or non-static.

(ECMA-334; 8.7.3: Methods).

Now, the CLI standard defines the following:

Control is not permitted to simply “fall through” the end of a method. All paths shall terminate with one of these instructions: ret, throw, jmp, or (tail. followed by call, calli, or callvirt).

(ECMA-335; 12.4, 6)

This means, that in C#, a method returning void does not need a return statement. However, as the C# compiler compiles the C# code to IL Code, which requires a path termination at the end of a method, it emits a ret to end the method.

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It is indeed required in order for the code to be verifiable. Otherwise PEVerify will output the following error message:

[IL]: Error: [(filename) : (methodname)][offset 0x00000000] fall through end of the method without returning

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From Ecma-335. (12.4, 6)

Control is not permitted to simply “fall through” the end of a method. All paths shall terminate with one of these instructions: ret, throw, jmp, or (tail. followed by call, calli, or callvirt).

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1  
Ecma-355 is titled 'Tunnelling of QSIG over SIP' –  Hans Passant Sep 12 '10 at 17:54
    
Oops, well spotted. –  Mark H Sep 12 '10 at 22:16
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