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I'm mainly a C# developer, but I'm currently working on a project in Python.

How can I represent the equivalent of an Enum in Python?


locked by animuson Jan 25 at 1:44

This question's answers are a collaborative effort: if you see something that can be improved, just edit the answer to improve it! No additional answers can be added here

43 Answers 43

It's funny, I just had a need for this the other day and I couldnt find an implementation worth using... so I wrote my own:

import functools

class EnumValue(object):
    def __init__(self,name,value,type):
    def __str__(self):
        return self.__name
    def __repr__(self):#2.6 only... so change to what ever you need...
        return '{cls}({0!r},{1!r},{2})'.format(self.__name,self.__value,self.Type.__name__,cls=type(self).__name__)

    def __hash__(self):
        return hash(self.__value)
    def __nonzero__(self):
        return bool(self.__value)
    def __cmp__(self,other):
        if isinstance(other,EnumValue):
            return cmp(self.__value,other.__value)
            return cmp(self.__value,other)#hopefully their the same type... but who cares?
    def __or__(self,other):
        if other is None:
            return self
        elif type(self) is not type(other):
            raise TypeError()
        return EnumValue('{0.Name} | {1.Name}'.format(self,other),self.Value|other.Value,self.Type)
    def __and__(self,other):
        if other is None:
            return self
        elif type(self) is not type(other):
            raise TypeError()
        return EnumValue('{0.Name} & {1.Name}'.format(self,other),self.Value&other.Value,self.Type)
    def __contains__(self,other):
        if self.Value==other.Value:
            return True
        return bool(self&other)
    def __invert__(self):
        return functools.reduce(EnumValue.__or__,(enum for enum in enumerables.itervalues() if enum not in self))

    def Name(self):
        return self.__name

    def Value(self):
        return self.__value

class EnumMeta(type):
    def __addToReverseLookup(rev,value,newKeys,nextIter,force=True):
        if value in rev:
            forced,items=rev.get(value,(force,()) )
            if forced and force: #value was forced, so just append
            elif not forced:#move it to a new spot
            else: #not forcing this value
                next =
        else:#set it and forget it
        return value

    def __init__(cls,name,bases,atts):
        enums = classVars.get('__enumerables__',None)
        nextIter = getattr(cls,'__nextitr__',itertools.count)()

        if enums is not None:
            #build reverse lookup
            for item in enums:
                if isinstance(item,(tuple,list)):
                    value=EnumMeta.__addToReverseLookup(reverseLookup,value,(str(item),),nextIter,False)#add it to the reverse lookup, but don't force it to that value

            #build values and clean up reverse lookup
            for value,fkeys in reverseLookup.iteritems():
                for key in keys:
                reverseLookup[value]=tuple(val for val in values.itervalues() if val.Value == value)
        setattr(cls,'_Max',max([key for key in reverseLookup] or [0]))
        return super(EnumMeta,cls).__init__(name,bases,atts)

    def __iter__(cls):
        for enum in cls.__enumerables__.itervalues():
            yield enum
    def GetEnumByName(cls,name):
        return cls.__enumerables__.get(name,None)
    def GetEnumByValue(cls,value):
        return cls.__reverseLookup__.get(value,(None,))[0]

class Enum(object):

class FlagEnum(Enum):
    def __nextitr__():
        yield 0
        for val in itertools.count():
            yield 2**val

def enum(name,*args):
    return EnumMeta(name,(Enum,),dict(__enumerables__=args))

Take it or leave it, it did what I needed it to do :)

Use it like:

class Air(FlagEnum):

class Mammals(Enum):
Bool = enum('Bool','Yes',('No',0))

Why must enumerations be ints? Unfortunately, I can't think of any good looking construct to produce this without changing the Python language, so I'll use strings:

class Enumerator(object):
    def __init__(self, name): = name

    def __eq__(self, other):
        if == other:
            return True
        return self is other

    def __ne__(self, other):
        if != other:
            return False
        return self is other

    def __repr__(self):
        return 'Enumerator({0})'.format(

    def __str__(self):

class Enum(object):
    def __init__(self, *enumerators):
        for e in enumerators:
            setattr(self, e, Enumerator(e))
    def __getitem__(self, key):
        return getattr(self, key)

Then again maybe it's even better now that we can naturally test against strings, for the sake of configuration files or other remote input.


class Cow(object):
    State = Enum(
    state = State.standing

In [1]: from enum import Enum

In [2]: c = Cow()

In [3]: c2 = Cow()

In [4]: c.state, c2.state
Out[4]: (Enumerator(standing), Enumerator(standing))

In [5]: c.state == c2.state
Out[5]: True

In [6]: c.State.mooing
Out[6]: Enumerator(mooing)

In [7]: c.State['mooing']
Out[7]: Enumerator(mooing)

In [8]: c.state = Cow.State.dead

In [9]: c.state == c2.state
Out[9]: False

In [10]: c.state == Cow.State.dead
Out[10]: True

In [11]: c.state == 'dead'
Out[11]: True

In [12]: c.state == Cow.State['dead']
Out[11]: True

A variant (with support to get an enum value's name) to Alec Thomas's neat answer:

class EnumBase(type):
    def __init__(self, name, base, fields):
        super(EnumBase, self).__init__(name, base, fields)
        self.__mapping = dict((v, k) for k, v in fields.iteritems())
    def __getitem__(self, val):
        return self.__mapping[val]

def enum(*seq, **named):
    enums = dict(zip(seq, range(len(seq))), **named)
    return EnumBase('Enum', (), enums)

Numbers = enum(ONE=1, TWO=2, THREE='three')
print Numbers.TWO
print Numbers[Numbers.ONE]
print Numbers[2]
print Numbers['three']

Here's an approach with some different characteristics I find valuable:

  • allows > and < comparison based on order in enum, not lexical order
  • can address item by name, property or index: x.a, x['a'] or x[0]
  • supports slicing operations like [:] or [-1]

and most importantly prevents comparisons between enums of different types!

Based closely on

Many doctests included here to illustrate what's different about this approach.

def enum(*names):
    Well-behaved enumerated type, easier than creating custom classes

    Create a custom type that implements an enumeration.  Similar in concept
    to a C enum but with some additional capabilities and protections.  See

    names       Ordered list of names.  The order in which names are given
                will be the sort order in the enum type.  Duplicate names
                are not allowed.  Unicode names are mapped to ASCII.

    Object of type enum, with the input names and the enumerated values.

    >>> letters = enum('a','e','i','o','u','b','c','y','z')
    >>> letters.a < letters.e

    ## index by property
    >>> letters.a

    ## index by position
    >>> letters[0]

    ## index by name, helpful for bridging string inputs to enum
    >>> letters['a']

    ## sorting by order in the enum() create, not character value
    >>> letters.u < letters.b

    ## normal slicing operations available
    >>> letters[-1]

    ## error since there are not 100 items in enum
    >>> letters[99]
    Traceback (most recent call last):
    IndexError: tuple index out of range

    ## error since name does not exist in enum
    >>> letters['ggg']
    Traceback (most recent call last):
    ValueError: tuple.index(x): x not in tuple

    ## enums must be named using valid Python identifiers
    >>> numbers = enum(1,2,3,4)
    Traceback (most recent call last):
    AssertionError: Enum values must be string or unicode

    >>> a = enum('-a','-b')
    Traceback (most recent call last):
    TypeError: Error when calling the metaclass bases
        __slots__ must be identifiers

    ## create another enum
    >>> tags = enum('a','b','c')
    >>> tags.a
    >>> letters.a

    ## can't compare values from different enums
    >>> letters.a == tags.a
    Traceback (most recent call last):
    AssertionError: Only values from the same enum are comparable

    >>> letters.a < tags.a
    Traceback (most recent call last):
    AssertionError: Only values from the same enum are comparable

    ## can't update enum after create
    >>> letters.a = 'x'
    Traceback (most recent call last):
    AttributeError: 'EnumClass' object attribute 'a' is read-only

    ## can't update enum after create
    >>> del letters.u
    Traceback (most recent call last):
    AttributeError: 'EnumClass' object attribute 'u' is read-only

    ## can't have non-unique enum values
    >>> x = enum('a','b','c','a')
    Traceback (most recent call last):
    AssertionError: Enums must not repeat values

    ## can't have zero enum values
    >>> x = enum()
    Traceback (most recent call last):
    AssertionError: Empty enums are not supported

    ## can't have enum values that look like special function names
    ## since these could collide and lead to non-obvious errors
    >>> x = enum('a','b','c','__cmp__')
    Traceback (most recent call last):
    AssertionError: Enum values beginning with __ are not supported

    Enum values of unicode type are not preserved, mapped to ASCII instead.

    ## must have at least one enum value
    assert names, 'Empty enums are not supported'
    ## enum values must be strings
    assert len([i for i in names if not isinstance(i, types.StringTypes) and not \
        isinstance(i, unicode)]) == 0, 'Enum values must be string or unicode'
    ## enum values must not collide with special function names
    assert len([i for i in names if i.startswith("__")]) == 0,\
        'Enum values beginning with __ are not supported'
    ## each enum value must be unique from all others
    assert names == uniquify(names), 'Enums must not repeat values'

    class EnumClass(object):
        """ See parent function for explanation """

        __slots__ = names

        def __iter__(self):
            return iter(constants)

        def __len__(self):
            return len(constants)

        def __getitem__(self, i):
            ## this makes xx['name'] possible
            if isinstance(i, types.StringTypes):
                i = names.index(i)
            ## handles the more normal xx[0]
            return constants[i]

        def __repr__(self):
            return 'enum' + str(names)

        def __str__(self):
            return 'enum ' + str(constants)

        def index(self, i):
            return names.index(i)

    class EnumValue(object):
        """ See parent function for explanation """

        __slots__ = ('__value')

        def __init__(self, value):
            self.__value = value

        value = property(lambda self: self.__value)

        enumtype = property(lambda self: enumtype)

        def __hash__(self):
            return hash(self.__value)

        def __cmp__(self, other):
            assert self.enumtype is other.enumtype, 'Only values from the same enum are comparable'
            return cmp(self.value, other.value)

        def __invert__(self):
            return constants[maximum - self.value]

        def __nonzero__(self):
            ## return bool(self.value)
            ## Original code led to bool(x[0])==False, not correct
            return True

        def __repr__(self):
            return str(names[self.value])

    maximum = len(names) - 1
    constants = [None] * len(names)
    for i, each in enumerate(names):
        val = EnumValue(i)
        setattr(EnumClass, each, val)
        constants[i] = val
    constants = tuple(constants)
    enumtype = EnumClass()
    return enumtype

Here is a nice Python recipe that I found here:

def enum(typename, field_names):
    "Create a new enumeration type"

    if isinstance(field_names, str):
        field_names = field_names.replace(',', ' ').split()
    d = dict((reversed(nv) for nv in enumerate(field_names)), __slots__ = ())
    return type(typename, (object,), d)()

Example Usage:


More details can be found on the recipe page.

def enum( *names ):

    Makes enum.
        E = enum( 'YOUR', 'KEYS', 'HERE' )
        print( E.HERE )

    class Enum():
    for index, name in enumerate( names ):
        setattr( Enum, name, index )
    return Enum

Python 2.7 and find_name()

Here is an easy-to-read implementation of the chosen idea with some helper methods, which perhaps are more Pythonic and cleaner to use than "reverse_mapping". Requires Python >= 2.7.

To address some comments below, Enums are quite useful to prevent spelling mistakes in code, e.g. for state machines, error classifiers, etc.

def Enum(*sequential, **named):
  """Generate a new enum type. Usage example:

  ErrorClass = Enum('STOP','GO')
  print ErrorClass.find_name(ErrorClass.STOP)
    = "STOP"
  print ErrorClass.find_val("STOP")
    = 0
  ErrorClass.FOO     # Raises AttributeError
  enums = { v:k for k,v in enumerate(sequential) } if not named else named

  def find_name(cls, val):
    result = [ k for k,v in cls.__dict__.iteritems() if v == val ]
    if not len(result):
        raise ValueError("Value %s not found in Enum" % val)
    return result[0]

  def find_val(cls, n):
    return getattr(cls, n)

  enums['find_val'] = find_val
  enums['find_name'] = find_name
  return type('Enum', (), enums)

Use the following.

TYPE = {'EAN13':   u'EAN-13',
        'CODE39':  u'Code 39',
        'CODE128': u'Code 128',
        'i25':     u'Interleaved 2 of 5',}

>>> TYPE.items()
[('EAN13', u'EAN-13'), ('i25', u'Interleaved 2 of 5'), ('CODE39', u'Code 39'), ('CODE128', u'Code 128')]
>>> TYPE.keys()
['EAN13', 'i25', 'CODE39', 'CODE128']
>>> TYPE.values()
[u'EAN-13', u'Interleaved 2 of 5', u'Code 39', u'Code 128']

I used that for Django model choices, and it looks very pythonic. It is not really an Enum, but it does the job.


Following the Java like enum implementation proposed by Aaron Maenpaa, I came out with the following. The idea was to make it generic and parseable.

class Enum:
    #Java like implementation for enums.
    #class Tool(Enum): name = 'Tool'
    #Tool.DRILL = Tool.register('drill')
    #Tool.HAMMER = Tool.register('hammer')
    #Tool.WRENCH = Tool.register('wrench')

    name = 'Enum'    # Enum name
    _reg = dict([])   # Enum registered values

    def register(cls, value):
        #Registers a new value in this enum.
        #@param value: New enum value.
        #@return: New value wrapper instance.
        inst = cls(value)
        cls._reg[value] = inst
        return inst

    def parse(cls, value):
        #Parses a value, returning the enum instance.
        #@param value: Enum value.
        #@return: Value corresp instance.        
        return cls._reg.get(value)    

    def __init__(self, value):
        #Constructor (only for internal use).
        self.value = value

    def __str__(self):
        #str() overload.
        return self.value

    def __repr__(self):
        #repr() overload.
        return "<" + + ": " + self.value + ">"

I like the Java enum, that's how I do it in Python:

def enum(clsdef):
    class Enum(object):
        __slots__=tuple([var for var in clsdef.__dict__ if isinstance((getattr(clsdef, var)), tuple) and not var.startswith('__')])

        def __new__(cls, *args, **kwargs):
            if not '_the_instance' in cls.__dict__:
                cls._the_instance = object.__new__(cls, *args, **kwargs)
            return cls._the_instance

        def __init__(self):
            clsdef.values=lambda cls, e=Enum: e.values()
            clsdef.valueOf=lambda cls, n, e=self: e.valueOf(n)
            for ordinal, key in enumerate(self.__class__.__slots__):
                args=getattr(clsdef, key)
                setattr(self, key, instance)

        def values(cls):
            if not hasattr(cls, '_values'):
                cls._values=[getattr(cls, name) for name in cls.__slots__]
            return cls._values

        def valueOf(self, name):
            return getattr(self, name)

        def __repr__(self):
            return ''.join(['<class Enum (', clsdef.__name__, ') at ', str(hex(id(self))), '>'])

    return Enum()

Sample use:

class Test(object):

    while True:
            F, G, H, I, J, K, L, M, N, O=[tuple() for _ in range(i)]
        except ValueError:

    def __init__(self, name="default", aparam=0):

All class variables are defined as a tuple, just like the constructor. So far, you can't use named arguments.


I use a metaclass to implement an enumeration (in my thought, it is a const). Here is the code:

class ConstMeta(type):
    Metaclass for some class that store constants
    def __init__(cls, name, bases, dct):
        init class instance
        def static_attrs():
            @rtype: (static_attrs, static_val_set)
            @return: Static attributes in dict format and static value set
            import types
            attrs = {}
            val_set = set()
            #Maybe more
            filter_names = set(['__doc__', '__init__', '__metaclass__', '__module__', '__main__'])
            for key, value in dct.iteritems():
                if type(value) != types.FunctionType and key not in filter_names:
                    if len(value) != 2:
                        raise NotImplementedError('not support for values that is not 2 elements!')
                    #Check value[0] duplication.
                    if value[0] not in val_set:
                        raise KeyError("%s 's key: %s is duplicated!" % (dict([(key, value)]), value[0]))
                    attrs[key] = value
            return attrs, val_set

        attrs, val_set = static_attrs()
        #Set STATIC_ATTRS to class instance so that can reuse
        setattr(cls, 'STATIC_ATTRS', attrs)
        setattr(cls, 'static_val_set', val_set)
        super(ConstMeta, cls).__init__(name, bases, dct)

    def __getattribute__(cls, name):
        Rewrite the special function so as to get correct attribute value
        static_attrs = object.__getattribute__(cls, 'STATIC_ATTRS')
        if name in static_attrs:
            return static_attrs[name][0]
        return object.__getattribute__(cls, name)

    def static_values(cls):
        Put values in static attribute into a list, use the function to validate value.
        @return: Set of values
        return cls.static_val_set

    def __getitem__(cls, key):
        Rewrite to make syntax SomeConstClass[key] works, and return desc string of related static value.
        @return: Desc string of related static value
        for k, v in cls.STATIC_ATTRS.iteritems():
            if v[0] == key:
                return v[1]
        raise KeyError('Key: %s does not exists in %s !' % (str(key), repr(cls)))

class Const(object):
    Base class for constant class.


    Definition: (must inherit from Const class!
        >>> class SomeConst(Const):
        >>>   STATUS_NAME_1 = (1, 'desc for the status1')
        >>>   STATUS_NAME_2 = (2, 'desc for the status2')

    Invoke(base upper SomeConst class):
    1) SomeConst.STATUS_NAME_1 returns 1
    2) SomeConst[1] returns 'desc for the status1'
    3) SomeConst.STATIC_ATTRS returns {'STATUS_NAME_1': (1, 'desc for the status1'), 'STATUS_NAME_2': (2, 'desc for the status2')}
    4) SomeConst.static_values() returns set([1, 2])

    SomeCosnt's value 1, 2 can not be duplicated!
    If WrongConst is like this, it will raise KeyError:
    class WrongConst(Const):
        STATUS_NAME_1 = (1, 'desc for the status1')
        STATUS_NAME_2 = (1, 'desc for the status2')
    __metaclass__ = ConstMeta
#Const Base Class ends

def main():
    class STATUS(Const):
        ERROR = (-3, '??')
        OK = (0, '??')

    print STATUS.ERROR
    print STATUS.static_values()

    #Usage sample:
    user_input = 1
    #Validate input:
    print user_input in STATUS.static_values()
    #Template render like:
    print '<select>'
    for key, value in STATUS.STATIC_ATTRS.items():
        print '<option value="%s">%s</option>' % (value[0], value[1])
    print '</select>'

if __name__ == '__main__':

I like to use lists or sets as enumerations. For example:

>>> packet_types = ['INIT', 'FINI', 'RECV', 'SEND']
>>> packet_types.index('INIT')
>>> packet_types.index('FINI')

Didn't see this one in the list of answers, here is the one I whipped up. It allows the use of 'in' keyword and len() method:

class EnumTypeError(TypeError):

class Enum(object):
    Minics enum type from different languages
    Letters = Enum(list('abc'))
    a = Letters.a
    print(a in Letters) # True
    print(54 in Letters) # False
    def __init__(self, enums):
        if isinstance(enums, dict):
        elif isinstance(enums, list) or isinstance(enums, tuple):
            self.__dict__.update(**dict((v,k) for k,v in enumerate(enums)))
            raise EnumTypeError

    def __contains__(self, key):
        return key in self.__dict__.values()

    def __len__(self):
        return len(self.__dict__.values())

if __name__ == '__main__':
    print('Using a dictionary to create Enum:')
    Letters = Enum(dict((v,k) for k,v in enumerate(list('abcde'))))
    a = Letters.a
    print('\tIs a in e?', a in Letters)
    print('\tIs 54 in e?', 54 in Letters)
    print('\tLength of Letters enum:', len(Letters))

    print('\nUsing a list to create Enum:')
    Letters = Enum(list('abcde'))
    a = Letters.a
    print('\tIs a in e?', a in Letters)
    print('\tIs 54 in e?', 54 in Letters)
    print('\tLength of Letters enum:', len(Letters))

        # make sure we raise an exception if we pass an invalid arg
        Failure = Enum('This is a Failure')
    except EnumTypeError:


Using a dictionary to create Enum:
        Is a in e? True
        Is 54 in e? False
        Length of Letters enum: 5

Using a list to create Enum:
        Is a in e? True
        Is 54 in e? False
        Length of Letters enum: 5

protected by agf Apr 30 '12 at 20:51

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