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I'm build a library inspired by RSpec on top of NUnit 2.5+ in order to improve my tests readability. The source code is available at http://github.com/educobuci/SpecUnit.

This library allows me to write tests like this:

[Test]
public void It_should_returns_0_for_all_gutter_game()
{
    var game = new Bowling();
    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
        game.Hit(0);
    game.Score.Should(Be.Equal(0));
}

The "Should" method is an extension method for all Object that receives basically an Action with some NUnit assertions like that:

public static class Be
{
    public static Action<T> Equal(T to)
    {
        return (target) => NUnit.Framework.Assert.AreEqual(target, to);
    }
} 

The library is working pretty good but I have no tests for the library itself... basically because I don't know how to test it!

So, how can I test it? I mean, how to ensure that "object.Should(Be.Equal(object))" really checks the equality?

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1  
Personally, I would have just stuck with Assert.AreEqual( 0, game.Score), which is infinitely easier to understand than game.Score.Should(Be.Equal(0)). Not only does it not require additional unit tests, but it also doesn't require yet another set of documentation to figure it all out. –  Dave Sep 12 '10 at 0:39
    
@Dave My idea is to work with only one framework (mine :). In addition to be more "organic" for write, it also provides type checking in design time (thanks to generics). –  Eduardo Cobuci Sep 12 '10 at 2:31
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted
[Test]
public void Be_Equal_action_throws_AssertionException_for_inequal_integers()
{
   var action = Be.Equal(0);
   bool raised = false;
   try
   {
       action(1);
   }
   catch (AssertionException)
   {
       raised = true;
   }
   Assert.IsTrue(raised, "No AssertionException was thrown");
}
share|improve this answer
    
Actually I'm going to use Assert.Throws/DoesNotThrow, but that is the idea. Thank you! –  Eduardo Cobuci Sep 12 '10 at 2:25
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