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Is there a way to catch all uncatched exceptions in a rails controller, like this:

def delete
  schedule_id = params[:scheduleId]
  begin
    Schedules.delete(schedule_id)
  rescue ActiveRecord::RecordNotFound
    render :json => "record not found"
  rescue ActiveRecord::CatchAll
    #Only comes in here if nothing else catches the error
  end
  render :json => "ok"
end

Thank you

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4 Answers 4

up vote 38 down vote accepted
begin
  # do something dodgy
rescue ActiveRecord::RecordNotFound
  # handle not found error
rescue ActiveRecord::ActiveRecordError
  # handle other ActiveRecord errors
rescue # StandardError
  # handle most other errors
rescue Exception
  # handle everything else
end
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2  
Isn't the rule to NEVER catch Exception? –  RonLugge Nov 18 '14 at 1:13
    
but how can I catch all type in rescue => e block only? –  Matrix Feb 19 at 15:03
    
@RonLugge it depends entirely on the situation at hand. applying "never" as a rule of thumb is a bad idea. –  Justin Skiles Feb 25 at 0:04
1  
@JustinSkiles Catching Exception will catch syntax errors (and interrupt signals too). Give me one good scenario for doing that in production code. Catching signals directly I can get, but you'd need to do so explicitly to make it clear you're creating a signal handler. Just catching Exception... bad, bad idea. Catches even the things you shouldn't try to catch. –  RonLugge Feb 25 at 22:27

You can also define a rescue_from method.

class ApplicationController < ActionController::Base
  rescue_from ActionController::RoutingError, :with => :error_render_method

  def error_render_method
    respond_to do |type|
      type.xml { render :template => "errors/error_404", :status => 404 }
      type.all  { render :nothing => true, :status => 404 }
    end
    true
  end
end

Depending on what your goal is, you may also want to consider NOT handling exceptions on a per-controller basis. Instead, use something like the exception_handler gem to manage responses to exceptions consistently. As a bonus, this approach will also handle exceptions that occur at the middleware layer, like request parsing or database connection errors that your application does not see. The exception_notifier gem might also be of interest.

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3  
This is even more handy as it allows to catch exceptions in a DRY manner. –  m33lky May 7 '12 at 19:52
    
And if i use rescue_from with no params ? will that behave the same as rescue ? catch all errors ? –  minohimself Jan 18 '14 at 22:07
1  
Isn't it bad practice to rescue_from Exception? My understanding is that it is better to rescue from StandardError, so things like SyntaxError and LoadError are not caught. –  lobati Aug 22 '14 at 18:55

rescue with no arguments will rescue any error.

So, you'll want:

def delete
  schedule_id = params[:scheduleId]
  begin
    Schedules.delete(schedule_id)
  rescue ActiveRecord::RecordNotFound
    render :json => "record not found"
  rescue
    #Only comes in here if nothing else catches the error
  end
  render :json => "ok"
end
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3  
Stale question, but this answer is incorrect. rescue without argument handles only StandardError robots.thoughtbot.com/rescue-standarderror-not-exception –  karmajunkie Mar 20 '14 at 16:24

You can catch exceptions by type:

rescue_from ::ActiveRecord::RecordNotFound, with: :record_not_found
rescue_from ::NameError, with: :error_occurred
rescue_from ::ActionController::RoutingError, with: :error_occurred
rescue_from ::Exception, with: :error_occurred

protected

def record_not_found(exception)
  render json: {error: exception.message}.to_json, status: 404
  return
end

def error_occurred(exception)
  render json: {error: exception.message}.to_json, status: 500
  return
end
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