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Perl's quotemeta operator typically works on the SEARCH side of s///, but in generating code to be compiled with eval, how should I protect the REPLACEMENT that should be used literally but may contain bits such as $1?

With code of the form

my $replace = quotemeta $literal_replacement;

my $code = eval <<EOCode;
  sub { s/.../$replace/ }
EOCode

when will it produce syntax errors or surprising results?

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Why in the world are you doing that? –  Chas. Owens Sep 12 '10 at 20:52
    
@Chas It's a lot like the technique used in the example in perlfunc's entry on study. –  Greg Bacon Sep 13 '10 at 12:15
    
Are you sure that isn't premature optimization? You are opening yourself to a ton of problems with this and I doub't it will have a significant impact on your runtime. –  Chas. Owens Sep 13 '10 at 12:59
    
Why are you even using string eval? Just do my $code = sub { s/.../$literal_replacement/ }; this wll NOT interpolate the contents of $literal_replacement, just use it as a literal replacement string. –  MkV Sep 13 '10 at 22:03
    
@MkV - I understood his question that he wants $1 to be working inside the string, but nothing else. - I'm not sure how to guarantee that without coding that behavior explicitly. –  Sec Sep 14 '10 at 11:58

3 Answers 3

As far as I can tell, perl doesn't do magic things with $replace as long as you don't add the /e flag on the substitute. So quotemeta will always change your result, as it then contains a lot of backslashes.

#!/usr/bin/perl

$test="test";

$literal_replacement='Hello $1, or \1';
my $replace = quotemeta $literal_replacement;
$test =~ s/test/$replace/;

print $test,"\n";

returns:

Hello\ \$1\,\ or\ \\1

Which is probably not what you want :

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Thanks for your answer. I asked my question poorly, leaving out important context. Please see the updated question. –  Greg Bacon Sep 12 '10 at 19:00

The replacement side is a normal interpolating string (unless you start adding /e modifiers, in which case it becomes as many string evals as there are /e modifiers.). Perl 5 does not care what is in the variable you interpolate into the string. It is the same as:

my $foo = 5;
my $bar = '$foo';
my $baz = "$foo $bar"; 
print "$baz\n"; #this is 5 $foo not 5 5
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Thanks for your answer. I asked my question poorly, leaving out important context. Please see the updated question. –  Greg Bacon Sep 12 '10 at 19:00

The replacement is usually processed like a double-quoted string, but you can change that by using single-quotes as the delimiter:

$test =~ s<test>'$replace';
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer. I asked my question poorly, leaving out important context. Please see the updated question. –  Greg Bacon Sep 12 '10 at 19:01
    
I don't think I can help you there. I can't even imagine why you would want to do that. –  Alan Moore Sep 13 '10 at 4:29

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