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if I do something like this...

String myVar = "in";
if(myVar.ToUpper() == "in")
{
    //do something
}

This is not going to go inside "if" block ..right?

or

Is it going to check BOTH for "in" AND "IN" and do whatever is there inside that if? If so, why is that ? Isn't it supposed to skip what's inside of "if" block?

Same confusion is about ToLower() too

Edit: So to check for both cases, I need to write:

if((myVar.ToUpper().Equals("in"))&&(myVar.Equals("in")))

Like this..right?

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1  
Jon's advice is solid, but I'd like to explain what went wrong above. If you want to check for it being "in" and don't care about case, you can either do ToLower and compare to "in" or ToUpper and compare to IN. You don't need multiple compares. In any case, I do recommend what Jon advised. –  Steven Sudit Sep 12 '10 at 13:51

5 Answers 5

up vote 33 down vote accepted

Rather than converting to upper case and then comparing, you should use an equality comparison which can be made case-insensitive. For example:

if (myVar.Equals("in", StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase))
{
     ...
}

You should consider carefully exactly which rules are appropriate - ordinal, the current culture, the invariant culture, or possibly another culture entirely (e.g. using StringComparer.Create(culture, true)).

For more details around this, read the MSDN Best Practices for Using Strings in the .NET Framework article.

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+1 for being (so far) the only answer that mentions "culture" besides lower-case and upper-case. –  stakx Sep 12 '10 at 14:31
    
For if statements I totally agree with you but what about switch statement of strings? I've read somewhere that its best to convert string to upper case e.g. switch(myVar.ToUpper()) { case "MYCASE1": ... } –  Bear Monkey Sep 12 '10 at 14:43
    
@mjf196: That depends on the context - what's being upper-cased here? If it's user input, you really need to think about exactly what you want the behaviour to be. –  Jon Skeet Sep 12 '10 at 15:27
    
P.S. Ordinal comparison is the fastest method for comparing strings according to MS msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/vstudio/cc165449.aspx –  Paul Zahra Apr 4 '13 at 7:58
4  
@PaulZahra: Yes, but performance is almost always secondary to correctness. –  Jon Skeet Apr 4 '13 at 8:00

The expression something.ToUpper().Equals("lowercaseletters") will never be true, so in your example the if-block will not be executed. And of course, this applies to ToLower as well; something.ToLower().Equals("UPPERCASE") will never be true, either.

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"IN" is not equal to "in" - so it does not execute the if block. In the case of toLower() it would execute the if block as "in" equals "in"..

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First if you want to compare strings use .Equals()

myVar.toUpper().Equals("in")

Second first all code inside the if is executed, only after that the return is tested.

so

String myVar="in";
if(myVar.toUpper().Equals("in"))
{
  //do something
}

don't "do something".

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1  
Ok, I'll bite: why use Equals? –  Steven Sudit Sep 12 '10 at 13:49
    
Steven: fampinheiro is writing in Java apparently, where Equals is required because == is not overloaded for strings. –  Gabe Sep 12 '10 at 14:29
    
In some languages the “==” operator compares two object references to see whether they refer to the same instance. I do not believe this is the case in c# though; the operator calls String::Equals under the hood. It still compares the byte-by-byte values though, so you in fact probably want .Compare() –  RJFalconer Sep 12 '10 at 14:35
    
@rjfalconner: ty, i have learned one new thing today =) –  fampinheiro Sep 12 '10 at 18:44

If you do something like you said, it will not go into the if block, and here is why:

Operators are applied to the object on the left. So your code is the same as writing this:

String myVar="in";
String testVar = myVar.ToUpper();
if(testVar=="in") //This will never be true
{
  //do something
}

In your edit, you still aren't testing if your string is == "IN", you are doing 2 tests to see if your string is == "in".

If you changed your original to this it would work:

String myVar="in";
if(myVar.ToUpper()=="IN")
{
  //do something
}

Your edit should be like this to test both cases:

if((myVar.ToUpper().Equals("IN"))&&(myVar.Equals("in")))

EDIT: Some more explanation from Steven's Comment:

if((myVar.ToUpper().Equals("IN"))&&(myVar.Equals("in")))

That code sample does 2 comparisons, but if myVar will only ever be mixed case versions of in (IE: in In iN IN) then the second comparison is not necessary. Once I have converted the string to ToUpper(), you only need to check if it is equal to IN. So I would replace that line with:

if(myVar.ToUpper().Equals("IN"))

or

if(myVar.ToUpper() == "IN")

I would personally use the == not the .Equals method.

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I don't see the point of doing both tests. If the second is true, the first will also be. Likewise, I don't know why you're using Equals. Do you? –  Steven Sudit Sep 12 '10 at 13:53
    
@Steven I'm using it because that's what the OP used in his questions. In the second situation, you are correct. Just using it becase that is what the OP used. –  thorkia Sep 12 '10 at 14:13
    
Well, that explains it, but I assure you that our answers are not obligated to repeat any errors from the questions. :-) –  Steven Sudit Sep 12 '10 at 14:18
    
I know... I am putting an edit on it. –  thorkia Sep 12 '10 at 14:22

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