Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In C, can I say a white space in a string has a NULL type, or something else?
In C, which character represents the termination of a string?

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 12 down vote accepted

The null character (ASCII value 0, '\0' as a character literal) terminates a string in C. This character is not usually regarded as a whitespace character.

The space in the middle of this string for example: "Hello world" is the character with ASCII value 32. This is not the same as NULL or \0.

share|improve this answer
3  
In fact the name of the ASCII character that terminates a string is NUL –  EvilTeach Sep 12 '10 at 20:07

In C, can I say a white space in a string has a NULL type, or something else?

I'm not sure what you mean by a NULL type. A white space is a space character or tab or carriage return.

In C, which character represents the termination of a string?

The '\0' character is the termination of a string.

share|improve this answer

The following characters are regarded as "whitespace" in the sense that the isspace() function returns non-zero:

  • space (ASCII 0x32, C literal ' ')
  • tab (ASCII 0x09, C literal '\t')
  • vertical tab (ASCII 0x0B, C literal '\v')
  • form feed (ASCII 0x0C, C literal '\f')
  • carriage return (ASCII 0x0E, C literal '\r')
  • newline (ASCII 0x0A, C literal '\n')

The string terminator is the ASCII NUL (0x00) character; it generally has no effect on the cursor if you attempt to output it to a console or terminal.

share|improve this answer
1  
Trivia: NUL is coded as zero because it corresponds to blank paper tape leader. DEL is coded as 0x7f (or 0xff sometimes) because it corresponds to all holes punched on a paper tape, and it used to be called RUBOUT indicating that it was used to correct mistakes without requiring that an operator repunch an entire tape. –  RBerteig Sep 12 '10 at 21:48
    
@RBerteig: Interesting. And thanks for thw 'clean-up' –  Clifford Sep 13 '10 at 9:44

The termination character is a byte with value 0. Expressed as a literal character, it is '\0'.

Your first question about white space having a NULL type doesn't make any sense.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.