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So I'm trying to multiply matrices in c. However when I try to multiply the numbers in the two arrays, and put them in an answer array its always zero. heres the code for the method, thanks.

My matrix struct:

typedef struct matrix {
 int r;
 int c;
 double **mat;
 } *matrix_t;

My matrix multiplying method:

matrix_t mat_mult(matrix_t a, matrix_t b)
{
 int i, j, k;
 double x, temp1, temp2;
 double tempsol = 0.0;
 x = temp1 = temp2 = 0;
 matrix_t answer;

 if(a -> c == b -> r)
 {
    answer = mat_new(a -> r, b -> c);

    for(i = 0; i < a -> r; i++) 
       for( j = 0; j < b -> c; j++)
       {

           for( k = 0; k < a -> c; k++)
           {
               tempsol += a->mat[i][k] * b->mat[k][j];
               answer-> mat[i][j] =  tempsol;
           }

       }

 return answer;
 }
 else if(a -> r == b -> c)
 {
  answer = mat_new(a -> c, b -> r); 
  return answer;
 }
 else
 {
  printf("Matrices could not be multiplied");
  exit(1);
  return;
 }
}

heres the code for my mat_new as well

matrix_t mat_new(int r,int c)
{
int i = 0;
double **a;
matrix_t matrix_a;  

a = (double**)malloc(r *sizeof(double *));
for(i = 0; i < r; i++)
{
    a[i] = (double*)malloc(c *sizeof(double));
}
matrix_a = (matrix_t) malloc ( sizeof(struct matrix));
matrix_a -> mat = a;
matrix_a -> r = r;
matrix_a -> c = c;

return matrix_a;
}
share|improve this question
    
The code is not properly in the code block. You should edit and correct that one. Besides, just curious, are you allocating memory for the double **mat correctly ? –  Goutham Sep 12 '10 at 23:06
    
yea, i believe the memory is allocated correctly, it can store values and print them, but for some reason in this method it wont let me multiply numbers from the other two matrices and put it in the "answer" matrix. if i add them it works, but multiplying does nothing. –  jbernie2 Sep 12 '10 at 23:14
    
I am new to this site, what do you mean by it's not properly in the code block. –  jbernie2 Sep 12 '10 at 23:15
    
Re: the above: You might find it easier to allocate a linear array of memory instead of allocating all the row pointers (r * sizeof(double*)) and then allocating each column (c * sizeof(double)), which saves you r allocations. Then, to get an element of the array at row i, column j, access mat[i * c + j], where c is the number of columns. –  Jack Kelly Sep 12 '10 at 23:15
    
@jbernie2: Goutham means that it probably wasn't formatted well when you posted it. If you indent your code with four spaces, it gets syntax-highlighting and proper spacing. I see that @wallyk has fixed it up for you. –  Jack Kelly Sep 12 '10 at 23:16

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Seems like all your issues stem from reading in matrix values as integers rather than doubles. Everything works fine if you change temp in read_mat() to an int, then cast it to a double when you're putting it in the matrix.

share|improve this answer

You need to free your objects. You need to reset tempsol. But most importantly, you need to review your mat_mult().

matrix_t mat_mult(matrix_t a, matrix_t b)
{
 /* ... */
 if(a -> c == b -> r)
 {
  /* ... */
 }
 else if(a -> r == b -> c)
 {
                                    /* BZZZZT!                 */
  answer = mat_new(a -> c, b -> r); /* BZZZZT! mat_mult(b, a); */
                                    /* BZZZZT!                 */
  return answer;
 }
 else
 {
  /* ... */
 }
}
share|improve this answer

This should work for your example:

matrix_t mat_new(int r,int c)
{
  matrix_t new = malloc(sizeof*new);
  new->r   = r;
  new->c   = c;
  new->mat = malloc( r*c*sizeof(double) );
  return new;
}
share|improve this answer

Your code doesn't contain any obvious errors. Perhaps the problem lies in your mat_new(). The way you defined mat in your matrix structure as double **mat;, which I wouldn't recommend, may be causing some problems.

To allocate a 2x2 matrix to mat, you would need to do:

mat = new (double*)[2];
mat[0] = new double[2];
mat[1] = new double[2];

or a n by m matrix:

mat = new (double*)[n];
for (int i=0;i<n;i++) {
  mat[i] = new double[m];
}

Is this what you are doing?

share|improve this answer
    
this is my mat_new method, I dont't use the method you used, but if yours is better, i obviously will, anyways, heres mat_new –  jbernie2 Sep 12 '10 at 23:23
    
how do you enter more code? –  jbernie2 Sep 12 '10 at 23:24
    
i included the mat_new in the above code. –  jbernie2 Sep 13 '10 at 0:08
1  
The title was "C". Your solution is C++. –  user411313 Sep 13 '10 at 7:07

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