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I have a shell script with this code:

var=`hg st -R "$path"`
if [ -n "$var" ]; then
    echo $var
fi

But the conditional code always executes because hg st always prints at least one newline character.

  • Is there a simple way to strip whitespace from $var (like trim() in php)?

or

  • Is there a standard way of dealing with this issue?

I could use sed or awk, but I'd like to think there is a more elegant solution to this problem.

share|improve this question
1  
Related, if you wanted to trim space on an integer and just get the integer, wrap with $(( $var )), and can even do that when inside double quotes. This became important when I used the date statement and with filenames. –  Volomike Dec 10 '12 at 14:42

38 Answers 38

"Remove leading & trailing whitespace from a Bash variable", http://codesnippets.joyent.com/posts/show/1816

var="    abc    "
var="${var#"${var%%[![:space:]]*}"}"   # remove leading whitespace characters
var="${var%"${var##*[![:space:]]}"}"   # remove trailing whitespace characters
echo "===$var==="

Here's the same wrapped in a function:

trim() {
    local var="$*"
    var="${var#"${var%%[![:space:]]*}"}"   # remove leading whitespace characters
    var="${var%"${var##*[![:space:]]}"}"   # remove trailing whitespace characters
    echo -n "$var"
}

You pass the string to be trimmed in quoted form. e.g.:

trim "   abc   ";
share|improve this answer
2  
i mean local var="$@" –  Ярослав Рахматуллин Sep 14 '12 at 9:24
1  
Clever! This is my favorite solution as it uses built-in bash functionality. Thanks for posting! @San, it's two nested string trims. E.g., s=" 1 2 3 "; echo \""${s%1 2 3 }"\" would trim everything from the end, returning the leading " ". Subbing 1 2 3 with [![:space:]]* tells it to "find the first non-space character, then clobber it and everything after". Using %% instead of % makes the trim-from-end operation greedy. This is nested in a non-greedy trim-from-start, so in effect, you trim " " from the start. Then, swap %, #, and * for the end spaces. Bam! –  Mark Gollnick Nov 12 at 17:04

Old question but I didn't find a simple answer so try this:

echo "   lol  " | xargs

Xargs will do the trimming for you, it's one command/program, no parameters, returns the trimmed string, easy as that!

share|improve this answer
4  
Nice. This works really well. I have decided to pipe it to xargs echo just to be verbose about what i'm doing, but xargs on its own will use echo by default. –  Will Feb 18 '13 at 18:59
3  
Nice trick, but be carefull, you can use it for one-line string but −by xargs design− it will not just do triming with multi-line piped content. sed is your friend then. –  Jocelyn delalande Nov 28 '13 at 9:57

This worked for me:

text="   trim my edges    "

trimmed=$text
trimmed=${trimmed##+( )} #remove longest matching series of spaces from the front
trimmed=${trimmed%%+( )} #remove longest matching series of spaces from the back

echo "<$trimmed>" #adding angle braces just to make it easier to confirm that all spaces are removed

#result
<trim my edges>

To put that on less lines for the same result:

text="    trim my edges    "
trimmed=${${text##+( )}%%+( )}
share|improve this answer

Python has a function strip() that works identically to PHP's trim(), so we can just do a little inline Python to make an easily understandable utility for this:

alias trim='python -c "import sys; sys.stdout.write(sys.stdin.read().strip())"'

This will trim leading and trailing whitespace (including newlines).

$ x=`echo -e "\n\t   \n" | trim`
$ if [ -z "$x" ]; then echo hi; fi
hi
share|improve this answer

From Bash Guide section on globbing

To use an extglob in a parameter expansion

 #Turn on extended globbing  
shopt -s extglob  
 #Trim leading and trailing whitespace from a variable  
x=${x##+([[:space:]])}; x=${x%%+([[:space:]])}  
 #Turn off extended globbing  
shopt -u extglob  

Here's the same functionality wrapped in a function (NOTE: Need to quote input string passed to function):

trim() {
    # Determine if 'extglob' is currently on.
    local extglobWasOff=1
    shopt extglob >/dev/null && extglobWasOff=0 
    (( extglobWasOff )) && shopt -s extglob # Turn 'extglob' on, if currently turned off.
    # Trim leading and trailing whitespace
    local var=$1
    var=${var##+([[:space:]])}
    var=${var%%+([[:space:]])}
    (( extglobWasOff )) && shopt -u extglob # If 'extglob' was off before, turn it back off.
    echo -n "$var"  # Output trimmed string.
}

Usage:

string="   abc def ghi  ";
#need to quote input-string to preserve internal white-space if any
trimmed=$(trim "$string");  
echo "$trimmed";
share|improve this answer
1  
this is not working for string containing empty spaces inside (not leading nor trailing) like string=' test test test '; trimmed=$( trim $string ); echo "|$trimmed|"; will output: |test| –  Luca Borrione Aug 27 '12 at 15:46
1  
yes: trim works this way, but I mean that your original string will be cut using your function if it contains space separated words. Starting form a string like string=' wordA wordB wordC ' the desired trimmed string would be wordA wordB wordC while using your function results in having a string cut at the first word space-separated wordA –  Luca Borrione Sep 12 '12 at 14:41
#!/bin/sh

trim()
{
    trimmed=$1
    trimmed=${trimmed%% }
    trimmed=${trimmed## }

    echo "$trimmed"
}


HELLO_WORLD=$(trim "hello world  ")
FOO_BAR=$(trim " foo bar")
BOTH_SIDES=$(trim " both sides  ")
echo "'${HELLO_WORLD}', '${FOO_BAR}', '${BOTH_SIDES}'"
share|improve this answer

This is the simplest method I've seen. It only uses Bash, it's only a few lines, the regexp is simple, and it matches all forms of whitespace:

if [[ "$test" =~ ^[[:space:]]*([^[:space:]].*[^[:space:]])[[:space:]]*$ ]]
then 
    test=${BASH_REMATCH[1]}
fi

Here is a sample script to test it with:

test=$(echo -e "\n \t Spaces and tabs and newlines be gone! \t  \n ")

echo "Let's see if this works:"
echo
echo "----------"
echo -e "Testing:${test} :Tested"  # Ugh!
echo "----------"
echo
echo "Ugh!  Let's fix that..."

if [[ "$test" =~ ^[[:space:]]*([^[:space:]].*[^[:space:]])[[:space:]]*$ ]]
then 
    test=${BASH_REMATCH[1]}
fi

echo
echo "----------"
echo -e "Testing:${test}:Tested"  # "Testing:Spaces and tabs and newlines be gone!"
echo "----------"
echo
echo "Ah, much better."
share|improve this answer

The question is old, but...

var=`expr "$var" : "^\ *\(.*[^ ]\)\ *$"`

removes leading and trailing spaces. The most basic solution, I believe. Not Bash built-in, but 'expr' is a part of coreutils, so at least no standalone utilities are needed like sed or awk.

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This will remove all spaces ...

echo " test test test " | tr -d ' '

so this results in

testtesttest

This will remove trailing spaces...

echo " test test test " | sed 's/ *$//'

which results in

 test test test

This will remove leading spaces...

echo " test test test " | sed 's/^ *//'

which results in

test test test

This will remove both trailing and leading spaces

echo " test test test " | sed -e 's/^ *//' -e 's/ *$//'

which results in

test test test
share|improve this answer
2  
Very simple answer, like it! –  abc May 25 '12 at 0:57
38  
To generalize the solution to handle all forms of whitespace, replace the space character in the tr and sed commands with [[:space:]]. Note that the sed approach will only work on single-line input. For approaches that do work with multi-line input and also use bash's built-in features, see the answers by @bashfu and @GuruM. A generalized, inline version of @Nicholas Sushkin's solution would look like this: trimmed=$([[ " test test test " =~ [[:space:]]*([^[:space:]]|[^[:space:]].*[^[:space:]])[[:space:]]* ]]; echo -n "${BASH_REMATCH[1]}") –  mklement0 Jun 10 '12 at 14:05
2  
@mkelement +1 for adding detailed review of all the solutions. Really helps the reader figure out quickly which solution to use. –  GuruM Sep 21 '12 at 5:22
5  
If you do that often, appending alias trim="sed -e 's/^[[:space:]]*//g' -e 's/[[:space:]]*\$//g'" to your ~/.profile allows you to use echo $SOMEVAR | trim and cat somefile | trim. –  instanceof me Mar 19 '13 at 15:59

This will remove all the whitespaces from your String,

 VAR2="${VAR2//[[:space:]]/}"

/ replaces the first occurrence and // all occurrences of whitespaces in the string. I.e. all white spaces get replaced by – nothing

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1  
@downvotter, can you please care to explain? –  Alpesh Gediya Oct 22 '13 at 7:47
var='   a b c   '
trimmed=$(echo $var)
share|improve this answer
#Execute this script with the string argument passed in double quotes !! 
#var2 gives the string without spaces.
#$1 is the string passed in double quotes
#!/bin/bash
var2=`echo $1 | sed 's/ \+//g'`
echo $var2
share|improve this answer

You can trim simply with echo :

foo=" qsdqsd qsdqs q qs   "

# not trimmed
echo \'$foo\'

# trim
foo=`echo $foo`

# trimmed
echo \'$foo\'
share|improve this answer
var="  a b  "
echo "$(set -f; echo $var)"

>a b
share|improve this answer

While it's not strictly bash it will do want you want and more!

php -r '$x = trim("  hi there  "); echo $x;'

Do you want to make it lowercase too?

php -r '$x = trim("  Hi There  "); $x = strtolower($x) ; echo $x;'
share|improve this answer

I found that I needed to add some code from a messy sdiff output in order to clean it up:

sdiff -s column1.txt column2.txt | grep -F '<' | cut -f1 -d"<" > c12diff.txt 
sed -n 1'p' c12diff.txt | sed 's/ *$//g' | tr -d '\n' | tr -d '\t'

This removes the trailing spaces and other invisible characters.

share|improve this answer

I think many given answers are too complicated,
I would simply use sed:

function trim
{
    echo "$1" | sed -n '1h;1!H;${;g;s/^[ \t]*//g;s/[ \t]*$//g;p;}'
}



a) Example of usage on single-line string

string='    wordA wordB  wordC   wordD    '
trimmed=$( trim "$string" )

echo "GIVEN STRING: |$string|"
echo "TRIMMED STRING: |$trimmed|"

Output:

GIVEN STRING: |    wordA wordB  wordC   wordD    |
TRIMMED STRING: |wordA wordB  wordC   wordD|



b) Example of usage on multi-line string

string='    wordA
   >wordB<
wordC    '
trimmed=$( trim "$string" )

echo -e "GIVEN STRING: |$string|\n"
echo "TRIMMED STRING: |$trimmed|"

Output:

GIVEN STRING: |    wordAA
   >wordB<
wordC    |

TRIMMED STRING: |wordAA
   >wordB<
wordC|



c) Final note:
If you don't like to use a function, for single-line string you can simply use a "easier to remember" command like:

echo "$string" | sed -e 's/^[ \t]*//' | sed -e 's/[ \t]*$//'

Example:

echo "   wordA wordB wordC   " | sed -e 's/^[ \t]*//' | sed -e 's/[ \t]*$//'

Output:

wordA wordB wordC

Using the above on multi-line strings will work as well, but please note that it will cut any trailing/leading internal multiple space as well, as GuruM noticed in the comments

string='    wordAA
    >four spaces before<
 >one space before<    '
echo "$string" | sed -e 's/^[ \t]*//' | sed -e 's/[ \t]*$//'

Output:

wordAA
>four spaces before<
>one space before<

So if you do mind to keep those spaces, please use the function at the beginning of my answer !



d) EXPLANATION of the sed syntax "find and replace" on multi-line strings used inside the function trim:

sed -n '
# if the first line copy the pattern to the hold buffer
1h
# if not the first line then append the pattern to the hold buffer
1!H
# if the last line then ...
$ {
    # copy from the hold to the pattern buffer
    g
    # do the search and replace
    s/^[ \t]*//g
    s/[ \t]*$//g
    # print
    p
}'
share|improve this answer
1  
You are wrong: it does work on multi-line strings too. Just test it out!:) –  Luca Borrione Sep 18 '12 at 12:36
1  
@GuruM explanation added :) –  Luca Borrione Sep 19 '12 at 7:43

To remove spaces and tabs from left to first word, enter:

echo "     This is a test" | sed "s/^[ \t]*//"

cyberciti.biz/tips/delete-leading-spaces-from-front-of-each-word.html

share|improve this answer

What trim() does is remove whitespaces (and tabs, non-printable chars; I am considering just whitespaces for simplicity), I see many suggestions just to remove spaces. I agree most with an 'awk' reply, but I am more used to sed, so let me drop my version of this solution

var="$(hg st -R "$path")" # I often like to enclose shell output in double quotes
var="$(echo "${var}" | sed "s/\(^ *\| *\$\)//g")" # this is my suggestion
if [ -n "$var" ]; then
 echo "[${var}]"
fi

The 'sed' command trims only leading and trailing whitespaces, it can be piped to the first command as well resulting in

var="$(hg st -R "$path" | sed "s/\(^ *\| *\$\)//g")"
if [ -n "$var" ]; then
 echo "[${var}]"
fi

I hope this helps. :)

share|improve this answer

Bash has a feature called parameter expansion, which, among other things, allows string replacement based on so-called patterns (patterns resemble regular expressions, but there are fundamental differences and limitations). [flussence's original line: Bash has regular expressions, but they're well-hidden:]

The following demonstrates how to remove all white space (even from the interior) from a variable value.

$ var='abc def'
$ echo "$var"
abc def
# Note: flussence's original expression was "${var/ /}", which only replaced the *first* space char., wherever it appeared.
$ echo -n "${var//[[:space:]]/}"
abcdef
share|improve this answer
1  
It doesn't seem to work with cygwin. –  Paul Tomblin Dec 15 '08 at 21:54
1  
Or rather, it works for spaces in the middle of a var, but not when I attempt to anchor it at the end. –  Paul Tomblin Dec 15 '08 at 21:56
2  
They're regex, just a strange dialect. –  flussence Mar 5 '09 at 12:36
3  
${var/ /} removes the first space character. ${var// /} removes all space characters. There's no way to trim just leading and trailing whitespace with only this construct. –  Gilles Jun 3 '12 at 19:47

This does not have the problem with unwanted globbing, also, interior white-space is unmodified (assuming that $IFS is set to the default, which is ' \t\n').

It reads up to the first newline (and doesn't include it) or the end of string, whichever comes first, and strips away any mix of leading and trailing space and \t characters. If you want to preserve multiple lines (and also strip leading and trailing newlines), use read -r -d '' var << eof instead; note, however, that if your input happens to contain \neof, it will be cut off just before. (Other forms of white space, namely \r, \f, and \v, are not stripped, even if you add them to $IFS.)

read -r var << eof
$var
eof
share|improve this answer

I saw tons of reply, but none with this simple bash parameter expansion :

$ x=" a z     e r ty "
$ echo "START[${x// /}]END"
START[azerty]END
share|improve this answer
# Trim whitespace from both ends of specified parameter

trim () {
    read -rd '' $1 <<<"${!1}"
}

# Unit test for trim()

test_trim () {
    local foo="$1"
    trim foo
    test "$foo" = "$2"
}

test_trim hey hey &&
test_trim '  hey' hey &&
test_trim 'ho  ' ho &&
test_trim 'hey ho' 'hey ho' &&
test_trim '  hey  ho  ' 'hey  ho' &&
test_trim $'\n\n\t hey\n\t ho \t\n' $'hey\n\t ho' &&
test_trim $'\n' '' &&
test_trim '\n' '\n' &&
echo passed
share|improve this answer
#!/bin/bash

function trim
{
    typeset trimVar
    eval trimVar="\${$1}"
    read trimVar << EOTtrim
    $trimVar
EOTtrim
    eval $1=\$trimVar
}

# Note that the parameter to the function is the NAME of the variable to trim, 
# not the variable contents.  However, the contents are trimmed.


# Example of use:
while read aLine
do
    trim aline
    echo "[${aline}]"
done < info.txt



# File info.txt contents:
# ------------------------------
# ok  hello there    $
#    another  line   here     $
#and yet another   $
#  only at the front$
#$



# Output:
#[ok  hello there]
#[another  line   here]
#[and yet another]
#[only at the front]
#[]
share|improve this answer

Yet another solution with unit tests which trims $IFS from stdin, and works with any input separator (even $'\0'):

ltrim()
{
    # Left-trim $IFS from stdin as a single line
    # $1: Line separator (default NUL)
    local trimmed
    while IFS= read -r -d "${1-}" -u 9
    do
        if [ -n "${trimmed+defined}" ]
        then
            printf %s "$REPLY"
        else
            printf %s "${REPLY#"${REPLY%%[!$IFS]*}"}"
        fi
        printf "${1-\x00}"
        trimmed=true
    done 9<&0

    if [[ $REPLY ]]
    then
        # No delimiter at last line
        if [ -n "${trimmed+defined}" ]
        then
            printf %s "$REPLY"
        else
            printf %s "${REPLY#"${REPLY%%[!$IFS]*}"}"
        fi
    fi
}

rtrim()
{
    # Right-trim $IFS from stdin as a single line
    # $1: Line separator (default NUL)
    local previous last
    while IFS= read -r -d "${1-}" -u 9
    do
        if [ -n "${previous+defined}" ]
        then
            printf %s "$previous"
            printf "${1-\x00}"
        fi
        previous="$REPLY"
    done 9<&0

    if [[ $REPLY ]]
    then
        # No delimiter at last line
        last="$REPLY"
        printf %s "$previous"
        if [ -n "${previous+defined}" ]
        then
            printf "${1-\x00}"
        fi
    else
        last="$previous"
    fi

    right_whitespace="${last##*[!$IFS]}"
    printf %s "${last%$right_whitespace}"
}

trim()
{
    # Trim $IFS from individual lines
    # $1: Line separator (default NUL)
    ltrim ${1+"$@"} | rtrim ${1+"$@"}
}
share|improve this answer

Here's a trim() function that trims and normalizes whitespace

#!/bin/bash
function trim {
    echo $*
}

echo "'$(trim "  one   two    three  ")'"
# 'one two three'

And another variant that uses regular expressions.

#!/bin/bash
function trim {
    local trimmed="$@"
    if [[ "$trimmed" =~ " *([^ ].*[^ ]) *" ]]
    then 
        trimmed=${BASH_REMATCH[1]}
    fi
    echo "$trimmed"
}

echo "'$(trim "  one   two    three  ")'"
# 'one   two    three'
share|improve this answer
1  
The second, regular expression-based approach is great and side effect-free, but in its present form is problematic: (a) on bash v3.2+, matching will by default NOT work, because the regular expression must be UNquoted in order to work and (b) the regular expression itself doesn't handle the case where the input string is a single, non-space character surrounded by spaces. To fix these problems, replace the if line with: if [[ "$trimmed" =~ ' '*([^ ]|[^ ].*[^ ])' '* ]]. Finally, the approach only deals with spaces, not other forms of whitespace (see my next comment). –  mklement0 Jun 4 '12 at 21:53
1  
The function that utilizes regular expresssions only deals with spaces and not other forms of whitespace, but it's easy to generalize: Replace the if line with: [[ "$trimmed" =~ [[:space:]]*([^[:space:]]|[^[:space:]].*[^[:space:]])[[:space:]]* ]] –  mklement0 Jun 4 '12 at 21:54

I needed to trim whitespace from a script when the IFS variable was set to something else. Relying on perl did the trick:

# trim() { echo $1; } # doesn't seem to work, as it's affected by IFS

trim() { echo "$1" | perl -p -e 's/^\s+|\s+$//g'; }

strings="after --> , <-- before,  <-- both -->  "

OLD_IFS=$IFS
IFS=","
for str in ${strings}; do
  str=$(trim "${str}")
  echo "str= '${str}'"
done
IFS=$OLD_IFS
share|improve this answer
1  
You can easily avoid problems with non-default $IFS values by creating a local copy (which will go out of scope upon exiting the function): trim() { local IFS=$' \t\n'; echo $1; } –  mklement0 Jun 2 '12 at 3:17

I was researching this same question and could not find a real solution anywhere. So I ended up creating the following functions. Not sure how portable printf is, but the beauty of this solution is you can specify exactly what is "white space" by adding more character codes. If anyone can optimize this so it's smaller please do so. This is my first post on stack overflow.

    iswhitespace()
    {
        n=`printf "%d\n" "'$1'"`
        if (( $n != "13" )) && (( $n != "10" )) && (( $n != "32" )) && (( $n != "92" )) && (( $n != "110" )) && (( $n != "114" )); then
            return 0
        fi
        return 1
    }
    trim()
    {
        i=0
        str="$1"
        while (( i < ${#1} ))
        do
            char=${1:$i:1}
            iswhitespace "$char"
            if [ "$?" -eq "0" ]; then
                str="${str:$i}"
                i=${#1}
            fi
            (( i += 1 ))
        done
        i=${#str}
        while (( i > "0" ))
        do
            (( i -= 1 ))
            char=${str:$i:1}
            iswhitespace "$char"
            if [ "$?" -eq "0" ]; then
                (( i += 1 ))
                str="${str:0:$i}"
                i=0
            fi
        done
        echo "$str"
    }

#call like so
mystring=`trim "$mystring"`
share|improve this answer

This trims multiple spaces of the front and end

whatever=${whatever%% *}

whatever=${whatever#* }

share|improve this answer
5  
Your second command should presumably have ## not just #. But in fact these don't work; the pattern you're giving matches a space followed by any sequence of other characters, not a sequence of 0 or more spaces. That * is the shell globbing *, not the usual "0-or-more" regexp *. –  dubiousjim Jan 27 '11 at 18:50

assignments ignore leading and trailing whitespace and as such can be used to trim

$ var=`echo '   hello'`; echo $var
hello
share|improve this answer
5  
That's not true. It's "echo" that removes whitespace, not the assignment. In your example, do echo "$var" to see the value with spaces. –  Nicholas Sushkin Feb 9 '12 at 17:41
1  
@NicholasSushkin One could do var=$(echo $var) but I do not recommend it. Other solutions presented here are preferred. –  xebeche Aug 2 '12 at 11:08

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