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I would like to know what is the difference between static variables in a header file vs declared in a class. When static variable is declared in a header file is its scope limited to .h file or across all units. Also generally static variable is initialized in .cpp file when declared in a class right? So that does mean static variable scope is limited to 2 compilation units?

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The 'static' keyword is very overloaded. It means differntly at different places. That's why it makes a fun question to ask at interviews. –  Vardhan Sep 13 '10 at 7:40
    
Definitely among the top, together with abstract functions / abstract classes, and stuff like public / protected / private inheritance. ;-) –  DevSolar Sep 13 '10 at 8:09

3 Answers 3

up vote 26 down vote accepted

Excuse me when I answer your questions out-of-order, it makes it easier to understand this way.

When static variable is declared in a header file is its scope limited to .h file or across all units.

There is no such thing as a "header file scope". The header file gets included into source files. The translation unit is the source file including the text from the header files. Whatever you write in a header file gets copied into each including source file.

As such, a static variable declared in a header file is like a static variable in each individual source file.

Since declaring a variable static this way means internal linkage, every translation unit #includeing your header file gets its own, individual variable (which is not visible outside your translation unit). This is usually not what you want.

I would like to know what is the difference between static variables in a header file vs declared in a class.

In a class declaration, static means that all instances of the class share this member variable; i.e., you might have hundreds of objects of this type, but whenever one of these objects refers to the static (or "class") variable, it's the same value for all objects. You could think of it as a "class global".

Also generally static variable is initialized in .cpp file when declared in a class right ?

Yes, one (and only one) translation unit must initialize the class variable.

So that does mean static variable scope is limited to 2 compilation units ?

As I said:

  • A header is not a compilation unit,
  • static means completely different things depending on context.

Global static limits scope to the translation unit. Class static means global to all instances.

I hope this helps.

PS: Check the last paragraph of Chubsdad's answer, about how you shouldn't use static in C++ for indicating internal linkage, but anonymous namespaces. (Because he's right. ;-) )

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"static means completely different things depending on context." --> the very source of most confusion about it. This "not adding keywords" mindset is really annoying :( –  Matthieu M. Sep 13 '10 at 9:51
    
@Matthieu M. Depends on your standpoint. For keeping some compatibility between C and C++, it's very beneficial. I admit, though, that they've overdone it a bit with static. –  DevSolar Sep 13 '10 at 10:38
    
I know that compatibility was necessary, otherwise the language wouldn't have been as popular. However they could have used a new keyword for the C++ meaning, they could have made it "non-keyword" outside of a class/struct scope to preserve backward compatibility. I am glad that they did introduce the nullptr keyword in C++0x. –  Matthieu M. Sep 13 '10 at 11:21
    
Well... how static is used in class scope is somewhat similar to how it is used in function scope (variable persistent across multiple uses). And they did introduce a way to get rid of another use of static (anon namespaces)... all in all, not too bad a job. Better than Java, in any case. :-D –  DevSolar Sep 13 '10 at 11:24

Static variable in a header file:

say 'common.h' has

static int zzz;

This variable 'zzz' has internal linkage (This same variable can not be accessed in other translation units). Each translation unit which includes 'common.h' has it's own unique object of name 'zzz'.

Static variable in a class:

Static variable in a class is not a part of the subobject of the class. There is only one copy of a static data member shared by all the objects of the class.

$9.4.2/6 - "Static data members of a class in namespace scope have external linkage (3.5).A local class shall not have static data members."

So let's say 'myclass.h' has

struct myclass{
   static int zzz;        // this is only a declaration
};

and myclass.cpp has

#include "myclass.h"

int myclass::zzz = 0           // this is a definition, 
                               // should be done once and only once

and "hisclass.cpp" has

#include "myclass.h"

void f(){myclass::zzz = 2;}    // myclass::zzz is always the same in any 
                               // translation unit

and "ourclass.cpp" has

#include "myclass.h"
void g(){myclass::zzz = 2;}    // myclass::zzz is always the same in any 
                               // translation unit

So, class static members are not limited to only 2 translation units. They need to be defined only once in any one of the translation units.

Note: usage of 'static' to declare file scope variable is deprecated and unnamed namespace is a superior alternate

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thank you very much for a nice answer. –  brett Sep 13 '10 at 6:15
    
"Each file which includes"... is quite inexact, seeing that header files can include other header files. Better to stick with the phrase compilation unit or translation unit. –  Ben Voigt Sep 13 '10 at 6:25
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and +1 for pointing out that anonymous namespaces supersede the static modifier for global variables. –  Ben Voigt Sep 13 '10 at 6:28
    
@Ben Voight: Yup, I will change it to translation unit. Old habits die hard...Thanks –  Chubsdad Sep 13 '10 at 6:29

A static variable declared in a header file outside of the class would be file-scoped in every .c file which includes the header. That means separate copy of a variable with same name is accessible in each of the .c files where you include the header file.

A static class variable on the other hand is class-scoped and the same static variable is available to every compilation unit that includes the header containing the class with static variable.

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