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What is the difference between in and any operators in sql ?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 11 down vote accepted
SQL>
SQL> -- Use the ANY operator in a WHERE clause to compare a value with any of the values in a list.
SQL>

SQL> -- You must place an =, <>, <, >, <=, or >= operator before ANY.

SQL>
SQL> SELECT *
  2  FROM employee
  3  WHERE salary > ANY (2000, 3000, 4000);

For In Operator

SQL> -- Use the IN operator in a WHERE clause to compare a value with any of the values in a list.

but with the In you cannot use =, <>, <, >, <=, or >=

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What about ALL ? what are all the possible comparison operators i can use ...... –  Jagan Sep 13 '10 at 10:18
    
=, <>, <, >, <=, or >= –  Pranay Rana Sep 13 '10 at 10:22

IN->Equal to Any One in the List.

ANY->Compares Value to Each Value Returned by the Sub Query.

ALL->Compares Value To Every Value Returned by the Sub Query.

For Example:

IN: (Q):Display the Details of all the Employees Whose Salaries are Matching with Least Investments of Departments?

(A): SQL>Select Ename Sal Deptno from Emp Where Sal IN(Select Min(Sal) From Emp Group By Deptno);

ANY:

Meaans Less Than The Maximum Value in the List.

(Q):Get The Details of All Employees Who are Earning Less Than The Highest Earning Employee Controling Other Emp?

(A): SQL>Select Empno Ename Job Sl From Emp Where Sal

ANY:->Meaans More Than The Minimum Value in the List.

(Q):Get The Details Of All Emps Who are Earning more than the least paid of Department 10?

(A): SQL>Select Empno Ename Job Sal From Emp Where Sal>Any(Select Min(Sal) From Emp Where Deptno 10);

ANY:->It's Equivalent to In Operator.

Note: 'Some' is also used insted of ANY.

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With ANY, you need an operator:

WHERE X > ANY (SELECT Y FROM Z)

With IN, you can't. It's always testing for equality.

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ANY and ALL OPERATOR IN SQL SERVER 2008R2.

Using the > comparison operator as an example, >ALL means greater than every value--in other words, greater than the maximum value. For example, >ALL (1, 2, 3) means greater than 3. >ANY means greater than at least one value, that is, greater than the minimum. So >ANY (1, 2, 3) means greater than 1.

Similarly, >ANY means that for a row to satisfy the condition specified in the outer query, the value in the column that introduces the subquery must be greater than at least one of the values in the list of values returned by the subquery.

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Maybe for better understanding, these two conditions are equivalent. It's a matter of taste which one you use (provided the RDBMS supports both of them)

... WHERE x IN (SELECT Y FROM THE_TABLE)  
... WHERE x =ANY (SELECT Y FROM THE_TABLE) 

and these also

... WHERE x NOT IN (SELECT Y FROM THE_TABLE) 
... WHERE x <>ALL (SELECT Y FROM THE_TABLE) 
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While using all

SELECT empno, sal FROM emp WHERE sal > ALL (2000, 3000, 4000);

 EMPNO        SAL

  7839       5000

It will return result equivalent to query:

SELECT empno, sal FROM emp WHERE sal > 2000 AND sal > 3000 AND sal > 4000;

While using any

SELECT empno, sal FROM emp WHERE sal > ANY (2000, 3000, 4000);

 EMPNO        SAL

  7566       2975
  7698       2850
  7782       2450
  7788       3000
  7839       5000
  7902       3000

Returns a result same as

SELECT empno, sal FROM emp WHERE sal > 2000 OR sal > 3000 OR sal > 4000;

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