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cbind(1:2, 1:10)  
     [,1] [,2]  
  [1,]    1    1  
  [2,]    2    2  
  [3,]    1    3  
  [4,]    2    4  
  [5,]    1    5  
  [6,]    2    6  
  [7,]    1    7  
  [8,]    2    8  
  [9,]    1    9  
 [10,]    2   10  

I want an output like below

[,1] [,2]  
[1,] 1 1  
[2,] 2 2  
[3,]   3  
[4,]   4  
[5,]   5  
[6,]   6  
[7,]   7  
[8,]   8  
[9,]   9  
[10,]  10  
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Yup, this is called recycling and is one of R's base concepts. What other behavior do you want? –  mbq Sep 13 '10 at 10:08
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1 Answer

The trick is to make all your inputs the same length.

x <- 1:2
y <- 1:10
n <- max(length(x), length(y))
length(x) <- n                      
length(y) <- n

If you want you output to be an array, then cbind works, but you get additional NA values to pad out the rectangle.

cbind(x, y)
       x  y
 [1,]  1  1
 [2,]  2  2
 [3,] NA  3
 [4,] NA  4
 [5,] NA  5
 [6,] NA  6
 [7,] NA  7
 [8,] NA  8
 [9,] NA  9
[10,] NA 10

To get rid of the NAs, the output must be a list.

Map(function(...) 
   {
      ans <- c(...)
      ans[!is.na(ans)]
   }, as.list(x), as.list(y)
)
[[1]]
[1] 1 1

[[2]]
[1] 2 2

[[3]]
[1] 3

[[4]]
[1] 4

[[5]]
[1] 5

[[6]]
[1] 6

[[7]]
[1] 7

[[8]]
[1] 8

[[9]]
[1] 9

[[10]]
[1] 10

EDIT: I swapped mapply(..., SIMPLIFY = FALSE) for Map.

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You could also do r[which(!is.na(r))] assuming that r is a row of the matrix. –  lmichelbacher Nov 11 '11 at 15:23
    
length(x) <- n thanks, that was exactly what I was looking for –  greg121 Mar 5 '13 at 1:18
    
If you are just looking to write the file, you can replace the NA with blank by doing x[is.na(x)]<-"" –  Wet Feet Nov 25 '13 at 7:56
    
for some reason when I do cbind(x,y) I get repetitions... how do you add NA instead? –  Alex May 28 at 5:23
1  
@Alex If the lengths of all the inputs are the same then there is nothing to repeat. Did you change the lengths of the vectors like it says in my answer? –  Richie Cotton May 28 at 8:08
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