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I didnt see it in the C++ Faq lite

How do i define a base class so every class inheriting it is required to define a destructor?

I tried running this program

struct VDtor { virtual ~VDtor()=0;  };
struct Test:VDtor { virtual ~Test(){}  };
int main() { delete new Test; return 0; }

http://codepad.org/wFcE71w3 With the error

In function `Test::~Test()':
t.cpp:(.gnu.linkonce.t._ZN4TestD0Ev+0x1e): undefined reference to `VDtor::~VDtor()'
In function `Test::~Test()':
t.cpp:(.gnu.linkonce.t._ZN4TestD1Ev+0x1e): undefined reference to `VDtor::~VDtor()'

So, is it possible?

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17  
+1 for what's probably the most space-efficient yet self-contained example code I've seen so far. :-D –  DevSolar Sep 13 '10 at 12:47
1  
Why ? What's the point of forcing the user to write more code ? If you have clean-up to do, do it yourself, don't put the burden on your user; if you don't, it's useless. Could you provide an example situation in which it would actually be useful ? –  Matthieu M. Sep 13 '10 at 13:00
2  
@acid I'm not sure about @Matthieu, but that makes absolutely no sense to me. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Sep 13 '10 at 13:13
3  
@DevSolar: well, there’s still a redundant return 0; in the code … –  Konrad Rudolph Sep 13 '10 at 14:33
2  
@acidzombie24: No, you have it mixed up. The return type of main must be int and (only in C++) it must not be omitted but (only in C++) you don’t need the explicit return 0;. –  Konrad Rudolph Sep 14 '10 at 13:13

4 Answers 4

up vote 17 down vote accepted

It is "possible" in some sense (if your goal was that the derived class stays abstract otherwise). But it won't give the result you would like: Because the compiler will create a destructor itself implicitly if the programmer hasn't done so.

It's therefor not possible to force the derived class' author to explicitly declare a constructor.

(edit: Like @chubsdad notes noted, the error in your particular code is because you need to define the explicitly declared destructor of the base class).


Edit: Just for fun, there are situations that necessiate an explicitly declared constructor. Consider the following

struct Viral {
  struct Dose { };
protected:
  ~Viral() throw (Dose) { }
};

struct Base {
  virtual ~Base() throw() { }
};

struct Derived : Base, Viral { };

This code won't compile because the implicitly declared ~Derived will have an exception specification throw (Dose) which is looser than what ~Base has - so it violates the requirement that overriders shall not have a looser exception specification. You will need to explicitly declare the destructor appropriately

struct Derived : Base, Viral { ~Derived() throw() { } };

But this is not really a solution to your problem, because derived classes need to "cooperate" into either deriving from Viral or putting it as a non-static data member. It's also very ugly :)


Edit: The following seems to be a Standard conforming way to do it

struct Viral {
  struct Dose { };
protected:
  ~Viral() throw (Dose) { }
};

struct Base : virtual Viral {
  virtual ~Base() throw() { }
};

Clang and GCC (starting with v4.6) reject any derived class of Base that has an implicitly declared destructor, because it has an incompatible exception specification (any derived class shall call ~Viral directly, instead of indirectly by calling ~Base, the Standard says). Comeau accepts this, but I strongly suspect that it is non-conforming in this regard.

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1  
+1: I completely forgot about the implicit destructor while responding to this. –  Chubsdad Sep 13 '10 at 12:56
    
So does this mean No it isnt possible to force a derive class to define a dtor? –  acidzombie24 Sep 13 '10 at 13:01
1  
@acid i would say it is not possible to force the programmer to explicitly define a destructor in a derived class. Can you please show what you need this for? –  Johannes Schaub - litb Sep 13 '10 at 13:03
    
i wrote a comment below the question. –  acidzombie24 Sep 13 '10 at 13:08
    
@Johannes Schaub - litb: Sorry, I deleted my post to avoid confusion on wrong information. Probably you can remove reference to my post also –  Chubsdad Sep 13 '10 at 13:19

Every class has a destructor, regardless. Declaring a virtual destructor in the base ensures that children will have virtual destructors. This doesn't mean that the coder will need to explicitly declare a destructor -- that wouldn't be a good thing, anyhow. All it means is that, if a destructor is declared, it will be virtual.

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1  
Declaring the base's dtor to be virtual also means the implicitly declared dtor in any derived class will be virtual. Which, as you say, is all you need. –  Fred Nurk May 6 '11 at 2:13
    
@Fred: Yes, I should have been more clear in explaining that even implicitly declared destructors in child classes would always be virtual. Once virtual, always virtual. Thanks for pointing out my lack of clarity here. –  Steven Sudit May 7 '11 at 1:40
    
Looking at it again, "if a destructor is declared" is where I saw the problem: a dtor is always declared, either by the programmer or implicitly by the compiler. (This seems much more clear than my previous comment.) –  Fred Nurk May 7 '11 at 1:52
    
@Fred: Yes, I should have said "explicitly declared" in the last sentence of my answer. –  Steven Sudit May 7 '11 at 11:52
struct VDtor { virtual ~VDtor()=0;  };
VDtor::~VDtor () { } // <== Implementation.
struct Test:VDtor { ~Test(){}  };
int main() { delete new Test; return 0; }

To fix the error you have to actually implement the VDtor::~VDtor() like above.

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But that doesnt force derive class to implement their own destructor. –  acidzombie24 Sep 13 '10 at 15:31
4  
@acidzombie24: Either a class needs non-empty dtor and then nothing the base can do will help or the implicit and empty dtor is good enough and then there is no point in spelling it out explicitly, IMHO. –  wilx Sep 13 '10 at 15:57

When Test is destructed, it will call it's base class destructor, which doesn't exist. You should just declare it empty if you have no necessary destruction logic.

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