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I hate to admit it but I'm stuck trying to figure out how to do this.

e.g. pretending you have the following structure:

<div>
  ...
  <div>
    <ul>
      <li>
        <a href="..."><img class="foo"/></a><!-- "previous" -->
      </li>
      <li>
        <a href="..."><img class="bar"/></a>
      </li>
      <li>
        <a href="..."><img class="foo"/></a><!-- I'm at this node -->
      </li>
      <li>
        <a href="..."><img class="baz"/></a>
      </li>
      <li>
        <a href="..."><img class="foo"/></a><!-- "next" 1 -->
      </li>
    </ul>
  </div>
  ...
  <div>
    <ul>
      <li>
        <a href="..."><img class="foo"/></a><!-- "next" 2 -->
      </li>
      <li>
        <a href="..."><img class="baz"/></a>
      </li>
      <li>
        <a href="..."><img class="foo"/></a><!-- "next" 3 -->
      </li>
      <li>
        <a href="..."><img class="bar"/></a>
      </li>
    </ul>
  </div>
</div>

I'm in a jQuery event handler related to the highlighted "foo" node above. I want to find the "next" img element that is a "foo".

There's 2 problems though.

  1. I only want to select "foo" elements that are further in the DOM than the current node I'm at (e.g. the "previous" foo's, and the current foo are not desired)
  2. Although I've shown the nesting as a following a precise pattern, the generated code is/could be nested at any level... thus I can't just do .parent().parent().parent().siblings().find()... etc.

If you can imagine that every time the browser adds a node to the DOM it increments a counter and assigns the node that index... that you could retrieve... what I want is:

var here = $(this).getIndexInDOM();//e.g. returns 347
$('img.foo').each(function(){
  if($(this).getIndexInDOM() > here){//is this past our current index?
    doSomething($(this));//use it
    break;
  }
});

The .getIndexInDOM() method obviously doesn't exist in jQuery... but I'm curious if anyone has a solution to get the "next" element I'm after.

The only solution I can think of at the moment is really in-elegant and would perform pretty lousy when in the latter half of the images in the DOM...

//using vanilla JavaScript
var thisImg = theCurrentImageIHave;//some reference to the DOM element
var found = false;
for(var i=0;i<document.images.length;i++){
  if(found){
    if(document.images[i].className == 'foo'){
      doSomething(document.images[i]);
      break;
    }
  } else {
    if(document.images[i] == thisImg){
      found = true;
    }
  }
}
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Inside the click handler, try this:

Example: http://jsfiddle.net/QVphP/ (click a blue box to add a border to the next one)

var $foo = $('img.foo');  // get all .foo images

var idx = $foo.index( this );  // get the index position of "this"
                               //    relative to all the .foo images found

var next = $foo.eq( idx + 1 ); // grab the .foo for the incremented index
share|improve this answer
    
awesome! the .index() is exactly what I need here... and if I were using jQuery v1.4 I'd jump on it in a heartbeat ;-) but alas I'm not there yet so I'll need to loop a bit to get the index myself. –  scunliffe Sep 13 '10 at 16:33
1  
@scunliffe - jQuery 1.4 is not required when you're passing a DOM element (as in the example above). The two other uses of .index() require 1.4. :o) Here's the same example, but using jQuery 1.3.2 instead: jsfiddle.net/QVphP/1 –  user113716 Sep 13 '10 at 16:41
    
oh, man I've been staring at my code too long, you're right... .index(element) is supported in jQuery 1.0+ time to add a fix to my fix ;-) –  scunliffe Sep 13 '10 at 17:14

Check out this jsfiddle. Click any image with a red border (foo) and the next red border (the next foo) will change to yellow.

Depending on how many foos you have in the page, this solution could be a bit of a performance hit. But since you aren't on 1.4 yet, this will work.

share|improve this answer
1  
Nate - OP was mistaken about needing 1.4. Your solution would work, but you wouldn't really need to use anything quite so complicated using .data(). Here's your example updated: jsfiddle.net/Bs2M5/2 It just uses == to compare the DOM elements. :o) –  user113716 Sep 13 '10 at 17:07
    
@patrick very nice :) –  Nate Pinchot Sep 13 '10 at 17:14

Check out next. It does exactly what you want.

$('img.foo').next().css('background-color', 'red');

If you'd like to get all the items after your currently selected item AND you know what position it is in your DOM, you can use the gt selector to select all the items "greater than" itself.

For example:

$('img.foo:gt(4)')

would give you back all of the items that are "greater than" the 4th item in the selection (AKA, after and not the current one).

share|improve this answer
2  
next() only searches siblings, I thought? –  Isaac Lubow Sep 13 '10 at 16:04
    
JasCav - .next() only works for siblings. Read the question again. OP states "I'm in a jQuery event handler related to the highlighted "foo" node above." There are no siblings to the highlighted .foo. Some sort of up then over traversal is needed. :o) –  user113716 Sep 13 '10 at 16:04
    
@JasCav - according to the docs api.jquery.com/next .next() only traverses the siblings of the current node (this in my example, it would only find "next 1"... if "next 1" wasn't there, it wouldn't find "next 2" or "next 3") –  scunliffe Sep 13 '10 at 16:07
    
@scunliffe @patrick @Isaac - You're all correct. :-( I fail. Updated my answer. I think that's correct (I've used it before to solve a similar problem.) I'm not the best jQuery-er in the world. I'm learning too. Thank you for the correction. –  JasCav Sep 13 '10 at 16:08
    
Hmmm, .gt() might work here... I would still need to iterate over the full set to find out my "current" index first though I guess. –  scunliffe Sep 13 '10 at 16:10

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