Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've been reading about the OCP principal and how to use the strategy pattern to accomplish this.

I was going to try and explain this to a couple of people, but the only example I can think of is using different validation classes based on what status an "order" is.

I've read a couple of articles online, but these don't usually describe a real like reason to use the strategy, like generating reports/bills/validation etc...

Are there any real world examples where you think a strategy pattern is common?

share|improve this question
add comment

11 Answers

What about this:

You have to encrypt a file.

For small files, you can use "in memory" strategy, where the complete file is read and kept in memory ( let's say for files < 1 gb )

For large files, you can use another strategy, where parts of the file are read in memory and partial encrypted results are stored in tmp files.

These may be two different strategies for the same task.

The client code would look the same:

 File file = getFile();
 Cipher c = CipherFactory.getCipher( file.size() );
 c.performAction();



// implementations:
interface  Cipher  {
     public void performAction();
}

class InMemoryCipherStrategy implements Cipher { 
         public void performAction() {
             // load in byte[] ....
         }
}

class SwaptToDiskCipher implements Cipher { 
         public void performAction() {
             // swapt partial results to file.
         }

}

The

     Cipher c = CipherFactory.getCipher( file.size() );

Would return the correct strategy instance for the cipher.

I hope this helps.

( I don't even know if Cipher is the right word :P )

share|improve this answer
    
Is your example not more a Factory Pattern? Also I think it will not work in C# for example. Your "getCipher()" method is a static method but in C# you cannot define a static method on an interface (neither in Java I think but for this I'm not sure). –  FrenchData Jan 9 '10 at 17:20
4  
They go together. The Factory create the strategy, but the strategy it self hold the algorithm to perform the ( basically ) same operation. The strategy can also be changed at runtime. About the factory method you're correct, I have change it it. –  OscarRyz Jan 11 '10 at 15:55
add comment

One common usage of the strategy pattern is to define custom sorting strategies (in languages without higher-order functions), e.g. to sort a list of strings by length in Java, passing an anonymous inner class (an implementation of the strategy interface):

List<String> names = Arrays.asList("Anne", "Joe", "Harry");
Collections.sort(names, new Comparator<String>() {
  public int compare(String o1, String o2) {
    return o1.length() - o2.length();
  }
});
Assert.assertEquals(Arrays.asList("Joe", "Anne", "Harry"), names);

In a similar manner, strategies can be used for native queries with object databases, e.g. in db4o:

List<Document> set = db.query(new Predicate<Document>() {
  public boolean match(Document candidate) {
    return candidate.getSource().contains(source);
  }
});
share|improve this answer
add comment

I have an application that synchronizes it's user base each day against our enterprise directory. User's are eligible or not eligible based on their status in the University. Each day the provisioning program goes through and makes sure that those who are supposed to be eligible are provisioned in the application and those who are not are de-provisioned (actually according to a graceful degradation algorithm, but that's beside the point). On Saturday I do a more thorough update that synchronizes some properties of each user as well as making sure that they have the proper eligibility. At the end of the month I do some bill back processing based on usage for that month.

I use a composable strategy pattern to do this synchronization. The main program basically chooses a master strategy depending on the day of the week (sync changes only/sync all) and the time of semester relative to the academic calendar. If the billing cycle is ending, then it also composes it with a billing strategy. It then runs the chosen strategy via a standard interface.

I don't know how common this is, but I felt like it was a perfect fit for the strategy pattern.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I can think of several fairly simple examples:

  • Sorting a list. The strategy is the comparison used to decide which of two items in the list is "First"
  • You might have an application where the sorting algorithm itself (QuickSort, HeapSort, etc.) may be chosen at runtime
  • Appenders, Layouts, and Filters in Log4Net and Log4j
  • Layout Managers in UI toolkits
  • Data compression. You might have an ICompressor interface whose sole method looks something like this:

    byte[] compress(byte[] input);

    Your concrete compression classes might be things like RunLengthCompression, DeflateCompression, etc.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Are you sure that the status of an "order" is not a State pattern? I have a hunch that an order will not be handled differently depending on its status.

Take for example the method Ship on the Order:

order.Ship();
  • If the shipping method varies in function of its status, then you've got a strategy pattern.
  • If however the Ship() method succeeds only when the order has been paid, and the order has not been shipped yet, you've got a state pattern.

The best example of the state pattern (and other patterns) I found was in the book "Head First Design Patterns", which is amazing. A close second will be David Cumps' blogging series of patterns.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I know this is an old question, but I think I have another interesting example that I implemented recently.

This is a very practical example of the strategy pattern being used in a document delivery system.

I had a PDF delivery system which received an archive containing lots of documents and some metadata. Based on the metadata, it decided where to put the document in; say, depending on the data, I could store the document in A, B, or C storage systems, or a mix of the three.

Different customers used this system, and they had different rollback / error handling requirements in case of errors: one wanted the delivery system to stop on the first error, leave all documents already delivered in their storages, but stop the process and not deliver anything else; another one wanted it to rollback from B in case of errors when storing in C, but leave whatever was already delivered to A. It's easy to imagine that a third or fourth one will also have different needs.

To solve the problem, I have created a basic delivery class that contains the delivery logic, plus methods for rolling back stuff from all storages. Those methods are not actually called by the delivery system directly in case of errors. Instead, the class uses Dependency Injection to receive a "Rollback / Error Handling Strategy" class (based on the customer using the system), which is called in case of errors, which in turn calls the rollback methods if it's appropriate for that strategy.

The delivery class itself reports what's going on to the strategy class (what documents were delivered to what storages, and what failures happened), and whenever an error occurs, it asks the strategy whether to continue or not. If the strategy says "stop it", the class calls the strategy's "cleanUp" method, which uses the information previously reported to decide which rollback methods to call from the delivery class, or simply do nothing.

rollbackStrategy.reportSuccessA(...);
rollbackStrategy.reportFailureB(...);

if (rollbackStrategy.mustAbort()) {
    rollbackStrategy.rollback(); // rollback whatever is needed based on reports
    return false;
}

So I now have two different strategies: one is the QuitterStrategy (which quits on the first error and cleans up nothing) and the other one is the MaximizeDeliveryToAStrategy (which tries as much as possible not to abort the process and never rollback stuff delivered to storage A, but rollbacks stuff from B if delivery to C fails).

From my understanding, this is one example of the strategy pattern. If you (yes, you reading) think I'm wrong, please comment below and let me know. I'm curious as to what would constitute a "pure" use of the strategy pattern, and what aspects of my implementation violate the definition. I think it looks a bit funny because the strategy interface is a bit fat. All examples I've seen so far use only one method, but I still think this encapsulates an algorithm (if a piece of business logic can be considered an algorithm, which I think it does).

Since the strategy is also notified about events during the delivery execution, it can also be considered an Observer, but that's another story.

From doing a little research, it seems like this is a "composite pattern" (like MVC, a pattern that uses multiple design patterns underneath in a particular way) called the Advisor. It's an advisor on whether the delivery should continue or not, but it's also an active error handler since it can rollback stuff when asked to.

Anyways, this is a quite complex example that might make that feeling of yours that usages of the strategy pattern are all too simple / silly. It can be really complex and even more applicable when used together with other patterns.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Again, an old post but still turns up on searches so I'll add two more examples (Code is in C#). I absolutly love the Strategy pattern since it has saved my butt a lot of times when the project managers say: "We want the application to do , but is not yet clear and it can change in the near future". I'm pretty sure this video explains everything that is so great about the strategy pattern, using StarCraft as an example: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MOEsKHqLiBM

Stuff that falls in this category:

  • Sorting (We want to sort these numbers, but we don't know if we are gonna use BrickSort, BubbleSort or some other sorting)

  • Validation (We need to check items according to "Some rule", but it's not yet clear what that rule will be, and we may think of new ones.)

  • Games (We want player to either walk or run when he moves, but maybe in the future, he should also be able to swim, fly, teleport, burrow underground, etc.)

  • Storing information (We want the application to store information to the Database, but later it may need to be able to save a file, or make a webcall)

  • Outputting (We need to output X as a plain string, but later may be a CSV, XML, Json, etc.)


Examples

I have a project where the users can assign products to people in a database. This assignment of a product to a person has a status which is either "Approved" or "Declined", which isdependant on some businessrules. (For example, is a user assigns a product to a person with a certain age, it's status should be declined, if the difference between two fields in the item is larger than 50, it's status is declined, etc.)

Now, at the moment of development these businessrules are not yet all completely clear, and new rules could come up at any time. The power of the stragety-pattern is that I made a RuleAgent, which is given a list of IRules.

public interface IRule {
    bool IsApproved(Assignment assignment); 
 }

At the moment of assigning a product to a person, I create a RuleAgent, give it a list of rules (which all implement IRule), and ask it to validate an assignment. It'll run through all it's rules (Which because they all implement the same interface, all have the IsApproved method) and return false if any of them returns false.

Now when for instance the manager suddenly comes up and says, we also need to decline all assignments to women, or all assignments to people with the last name "Johnsson" or whatever... You make new classes like this:

public LastNameRule : IRule
{
    public bool IsApproved(Assignment assignment) //Interface method
    {
        if (assignment.Person.Lastname == "Johnsson")
        {
            return false;
        }
        return true;
    }
}

public GenderRule : IRule
{
    public bool IsApproved(Assignment assignment) //Interface method
    {
        if (assignment.Person.Gender== Gender.Female)
        {
            return false;
        }
        return true;
    }
}

You see that you don't have to keep adding or removing if-statements or code, just make a new rule-class that implements the IRUle interface and switch those out when needed.


Another great example (by Scott Allen's video serie at http://www.asp.net/mvc/pluralsight The part where he uses the strategy pattern in in the UNit-test part of the application)

He builds a website which has a page that displays items based on popularity. However "Popular" can be many things (most views, most subscribers, creation date, most activity, least amount of comments, whatever), and in case management doesn't yet know exacly how to order, and may want to experiment with different orderings at a later date. You make an interface (IOrderAlgorithm or somethng) with an order method, and let an Orderer-object delegate the ordering to a concrete implementation of the IOrderAlgorithm interface. You can make a "CommentOrderer", "ActivityOrderer", etc... And just switch these out when new requirements come up.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for making me discover PatternCraft on youtube. Excellent! –  Florian Richoux Apr 7 at 4:47
add comment

I used the strategy approach in a fairly complex engine in an application that is a good example. Essentially the engine's role was to go and first find a list of people who had a widget, it's second role was to figure out which were the 10 best people with a widget based on an unknown number of parameters (things like price distance previous business together, ammount on stock, shipping options etc etc etc...)

Essentially what we did was we broke the problem into two strategies the first being data retrieval, as we knew that we had multiple sources of our widgets and we needed to be able to get the data and transform it to a common structure.

We then also realized that we had multiple algorithims some were based on weighting the parameters, others were very weird and propitery and I couldn't do them justice without pulling out visios and charts and well you get the picture, we had lots of algorithims for selecting the best people.

Our service itself was very thing it essentially defined the inputs, outputs and did some normalization of the data, it also used a provider pattern to plug-in the application specific data providers and algorithim providers which used the strategy. This was a fairly effective system.

We had some debates if we were using a strategy or a template pattern which we never resolved.

share|improve this answer
add comment

A few weeks ago, I added a common Java interface which was implemented by one of our domain objects. This domain object was loaded from the database, and the database representation was a star schema with about 10+ branches. One of the consequences of having such a heavy weight domain object is that we've had to make other domain objects that represented the same schema, albeit less heavyweight. So I made the other lightweight objects implement the same interface. Put otherwise we had:

public interface CollectibleElephant { 
    long getId();
    String getName();
    long getTagId();
}

public class Elephant implements CollectibleElephant { ... }
public class BabyElephant implements CollectibleElephant { ... }

Originally, I wanted to use CollectibleElephant to sort Elephants. Pretty quickly, my teammates glommed onto CollectibleElephant to run security checks, filter them as they get sent to the GUI, etc.

share|improve this answer
add comment

We had to create a third-party provisioning interface for an enterprise platform with a very complicated database. The submission of data to be provisioned was as a list of our data types which were put into a priority queue in our application so they could be written to the database in the correct order due to dependencies.

The process to write that data was then quite simple, keep popping off the top of the priority queue and then choose a strategy based on the type of the object that you extract.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Let's say you want to write an algorithm to calculate the nth Xday of a given month and year, e.g., the second Monday of October 2014. You want to use Android's Time class android.text.format.Time to represent the date, but you also want to write a generic algorithm that can also apply to java.util.Calendar.

This is what I did.

In DatetimeMath.java:

public interface DatetimeMath { 
    public Object createDatetime(int year, int month, int day);

    public int getDayOfWeek(Object datetime);

    public void increment(Object datetime);
}

In TimeMath.java:

public class TimeMath implements DatetimeMath {
    @Override
    public Object createDatetime(int year, int month, int day) {
        Time t = new Time();
        t.set(day, month, year);
        t.normalize(false);
        return t;
    }

    @Override
    public int getDayOfWeek(Object o) {
        Time t = (Time)o;
        return t.weekDay;
    }   

    @Override
    public void increment(Object o) {
        Time t = (Time)o;
        t.set(t.monthDay + 1, t.month, t.year);
        t.normalize(false);
    }
}

In OrdinalDayOfWeekCalculator.java, the class with the generic algorithm:

public class OrdinalDayOfWeekCalculator {   
    private DatetimeMath datetimeMath;

    public OrdinalDayOfWeekCalculator(DatetimeMath m) {
        datetimeMath = m;
    }

    public Object getDate(int year, int month, int dayOfWeek, int ordinal) {
        Object datetime = datetimeMath.createDatetime(year, month, 1);
        if (datetimeMath.getDayOfWeek(datetime) == dayOfWeek) {
            return datetime;
        } 
        int xDayCount = 0;
        while (xDayCount != ordinal) {
            datetimeMath.increment(datetime);
            if (datetimeMath.getDayOfWeek(datetime) == dayOfWeek) {
                xDayCount++;
            }
        }
        return datetime;
    }
}

In my Android app, I would call something like

OrdinalDayOfWeekCalculator odowc = 
        new OrdinalDayOfWeekCalculator(new TimeMath());
Time canadianThanksgiving = (Time)odowc.getDate(
        year, Calendar.OCTOBER, Time.MONDAY, 2);

If I want to reuse the same algorithm for java.util.Calendar, I would just write a class CalendarMath that implements the three methods in DatetimeMath and then use

OrdinalDayOfWeekCalculator odowc2 = 
        new OrdinalDayOfWeekCalculator(new CalendarMath());
Calendar canadianThanksgivingCal = (Calendar)odowc2.getDate(
        year, Calendar.OCTOBER, Calendar.MONDAY, 2);
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.