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I'm writing a program that parses a 10 websites, locates data files, saves the files, and then parses them to make data that can be readily used in numpy. There are TONS of errors this file encounters through bad links, poorly formed xml, missing entries, and other things I've yet to categorize. I initially made this program to handle errors like this:

try:
    do_stuff()
except:
    pass

But now I want to log errors.

try:
    do_stuff()
except Exception, err:
    print Exception, err

Note this is printing to a log file for later review. This usually prints very useless data. What I want is to print the exact same lines printed when the error triggers without the try-except intercepting the exception, but I don't want it to halt my program since it is nested in a series of for loops that I would like to see to completion.

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1  
Move the exception handling into the loops so you can catch the errors without breaking out of the loops? –  GWW Sep 13 '10 at 17:07
    
Sorry, maybe I wasn't clear on this. The exception handing is in a for loop. I want to know how to print the full traceback. "print Exception, err" often prints useless info like "<type 'exceptions.Exception'> 'name'" –  dustynachos Sep 13 '10 at 17:11
    
I think a Python fatal error means the interpreter is hosed for some reason and totally unable to recover. The run-of-the-mill Exception is much less severe. –  Nick T Sep 13 '10 at 19:18
    
@S.Lott: noted, I'll fix this now. –  dustynachos Sep 15 '10 at 23:14

5 Answers 5

traceback.format_exc() or sys.exc_info() will yield more info if thats what you want.

import traceback
import sys

try:
    do_stuff()
except Exception, err:
    print traceback.format_exc()
    #or
    print sys.exc_info()[0]
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7  
It looks like traceback.format_exc() yields the most information. Nice, Thanks! –  radtek May 30 '14 at 18:18

Some other answer have already pointed out the traceback module.

Please notice that with print_exc, in some corner cases, you will not obtain what you would expect. In Python 2.x:

import traceback

try:
    raise TypeError("Oups!")
except Exception, err:
    try:
        raise TypeError("Again !?!")
    except:
        pass

    traceback.print_exc()

...will display the traceback of the last exception:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "e.py", line 7, in <module>
    raise TypeError("Again !?!")
TypeError: Again !?!

If you really need to access the original traceback one solution is to cache the exception infos as returned from exc_info in a local variable and display it using print_exception:

import traceback
import sys

try:
    raise TypeError("Oups!")
except Exception, err:
    try:
        exc_info = sys.exc_info()

        # do you usefull stuff here
        # (potentially raising an exception)
        try:
            raise TypeError("Again !?!")
        except:
            pass
        # end of usefull stuff


    finally:
        # Display the *original* exception
        traceback.print_exception(*exc_info)
        del exc_info

Producing:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "t.py", line 6, in <module>
    raise TypeError("Oups!")
TypeError: Oups!

Few pitfalls with this though:

  • From the doc of sys_info:

    Assigning the traceback return value to a local variable in a function that is handling an exception will cause a circular reference. This will prevent anything referenced by a local variable in the same function or by the traceback from being garbage collected. [...] If you do need the traceback, make sure to delete it after use (best done with a try ... finally statement)

  • but, from the same doc:

    Beginning with Python 2.2, such cycles are automatically reclaimed when garbage collection is enabled and they become unreachable, but it remains more efficient to avoid creating cycles.


On the other hand, by allowing you to access the traceback associated with an exception, Python 3 produce a less surprising result:

import traceback

try:
    raise TypeError("Oups!")
except Exception as err:
    try:
        raise TypeError("Again !?!")
    except:
        pass

    traceback.print_tb(err.__traceback__)

... will display:

  File "e3.py", line 4, in <module>
    raise TypeError("Oups!")
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8  
That's really useful, but what's the Python 2 equivalent of traceback.print_tb(err.__traceback__)? –  Wilfred Hughes Mar 31 '14 at 14:52
1  
@Wilfred I've edited the answer to provide a workaround for Python 2 –  Sylvain Leroux Oct 2 '14 at 17:41

You will need to put the try/except inside the most innerloop where the error may occur, i.e.

for i in something:
    for j in somethingelse:
        for k in whatever:
            try:
                something_complex(i, j, k)
            except Exception, e:
                print e
        try:
            something_less_complex(i, j)
        except Exception, e:
            print e

... and so on

In other words, you will need to wrap statements that may fail in try/except as specific as possible, in the most inner-loop as possible.

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You want the traceback module. It will let you print stack dumps like Python normally does. In particular, the print_last function will print the last exception and a stack trace.

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My answer to another question may help, between the example and the links, in pulling out any specific bits of information if you would prefer/need. (Versus getting the standard pre-formatted traceback string like from traceback.py.) Line number, file name, those sorts of things.

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