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In my app I present to the user an option to customize the name of the file that gets produced. The format string the program reads is something like "yyyyMMdd-%1-%2-%3-%4" which the user can customize to his liking.

In this case the format of the date is yyyyMMdd and the %1 is the trip number like 1000P, %2 is the origin code like PTTTT, %3 is the destination code like PHYUD, and %4 is a secondary stop code like YYYY123.

I'm having problems taking the actual data and formatting into the custom string. I believe its the date format that I'm getting stuck on. So far I have

sOut = txtFormatPattern.Text
sOut = sOut.Replace("%1", "1000P")
sOut = sOut.Replace("%2", "PTTTT")
sOut = sOut.Replace("%3", "PHYUD")
sOut = sOut.Replace("%4", "YYYY123")

sOut = myDate.ToString(sOut) 'date is July 01, 2007

the output is "20070701-#1000P-PTTTTP12YUD (YYYY123)" The problem obviously here is my last conversion. The string contains key characters that denote a part of the date specifically in PHYUD. So my question is how can I give my user the flexibility to format the output as they wish and then convert that properly?

agp

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2 Answers 2

well i want to replace the tokens with their counterpart as stated above but also include some flexibility for dates and times. I have resolved this by doing the following:

'first replace the tokens by escaping the % character and number so that the
'date/time formatting ignores it
sOut = txtFormatPattern.Text
sOut = sOut.Replace("%1", "\%\1")
sOut = sOut.Replace("%2", "\%\2")
sOut = sOut.Replace("%3", "\%\3")
sOut = sOut.Replace("%4", "\%\4")

'now apply the date/time formatting as set by the user. the end result strips out
'the escape characters and ignores them for date/time formatting
sOut = myDate.ToString(sOut) 'date is July 01, 2007

'we should now have applied the date/time formatting and still have the original
'tokens so just replace
sOut = sOut.Replace("%1", "1000P")
sOut = sOut.Replace("%2", "PTTTT")
sOut = sOut.Replace("%3", "PHYUD")
sOut = sOut.Replace("%4", "YYYY123")

With this routine the user can set the formatting string as "yyyyMMdd-%1-%2-%3-%4" and the resulting output will be "20070701-#1000P-PTTTT-PHYUD-YYYY123"

That should work for any variant of the date/time formatting the user may set in the options since the valid tokens are always denoted by %n.

agp

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please edit your original question to add information. This is not a discussion forum, so we don't "reply to the thread". –  John Saunders Sep 14 '10 at 15:51
    
not sure what that means. I've added as much info as I thought was needed. Do you mean if I have found the answer to add it to the original question or can i just add it like I did here? –  sinDizzy Sep 14 '10 at 15:54

You can use String.Format to do what you want. Each section inside curly braces is a placeholder for a parameter you pass to the function.

Optionally, you can put a colon folowed by another formatting string specific to the parameter.

sOut = String.Format("{0:yyyyMMdd} {1} {2} {3} {4}", myDate, "1000P", "PTTTT", "PHYUD", "YYYY123")
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Thank you for the tip. I can do that if the format of the date stayed consistent but i'm afraid it will not. The user can opt to use almost any format they wish. for example something like yyyy-%1-MM-%2-dd (%3). Your tip though has given me food for thought. thanks. –  sinDizzy Sep 14 '10 at 20:18

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