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I'm trying to iterate over a 2D array that is structured in this specific way. Whether or not this is a good way to structure the array is another question - I still need to be able to iterate over it (if it is possible).

@row1 = ( "Current Scan", "Last Month");
@row2 = ( "240", "0");
@row3 = ( "226", "209");
@row4 = ( "215", "207");

@array = (\@row1, \@row2, \@row3, \@row4);
print Dumper(@array);
printarray(@array);

Dumper gives me the following output:

$VAR1 = [
          'Current Scan',
          'Last Month'
        ];
$VAR2 = [
          '240',
          '0'
        ];
$VAR3 = [
          '226',
          '209'
        ];
$VAR4 = [
          '215',
          '207'
        ];

I've tried several for loops with no success. Each only prints the first row ($VAR1) and quits. Here is my most recent attempt:

sub printarray {
  @array = shift;
  $rowi = 0;
  foreach my $row (@array) {
    for (my $coli = 0; $coli <= @$row; $coli++) {
      print "$array[$rowi][$coli]\n";
    }
    $rowi++;
  }
}

I'm obviously overlooking something simple. What am I doing wrong? Thanks in advance!

share|improve this question
    
Not sure what result do you expect, but there is an error in using length function. You don't need it, because it returns length of the string. Use $coli < @$row for loop condition. –  Ivan Nevostruev Sep 13 '10 at 20:49
    
Thanks, I've edited it to hopefully make it a bit more clear. I'm basically just trying to iterate through the entire array, and for some reason it is only going through the first row. –  Magicked Sep 13 '10 at 20:52
1  
I left out a very important part I think. At first I thought it was just me screwing up the iteration, but I had forgot I was passing it through a subroutine... I'm guessing that's the problem... –  Magicked Sep 13 '10 at 20:57
2  
You are using data dumper wrong. Remember that Perl expands arrays in function arguments into lists, so if you want a dump of your top level array, you need to use print Dumper \@array; instead of what you have. Perl's list expansion makes normal function calls akin to Lisp functions called with the APPLY function. See en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apply for more info. –  daotoad Sep 13 '10 at 22:31
1  
Also, see perllol and perldsc in the perldoc for examples of working with common data structures. See perldoc.perl.org/perllol.html perldoc.perl.org/perldsc.html –  daotoad Sep 13 '10 at 22:32

5 Answers 5

up vote 9 down vote accepted

If you want just print the array, try following code:

foreach my $row (@array) {
   foreach my $elem (@$row) {
       print $elem; ## print elements without separator
   }
   print "\n"; ## new line after row
}

If you need indexes for some purpose, here we go:

for(my $row_i = 0; $row_i < @array; $row_i++) {
    for(my $column_i = 0; $column_i < @{ $array[$row_i] }; $column_i++) {
        print $array[$row_i][$column_i];
    }
}

The idea is that @array in scalar context returns number of elements in array. And @{ $array[$row_i] } is a little more tricky. It dereference array stored in $array[$row_i].

Update for subroutine:

In perl you can pass array by reference:

 printarray(\@array); ## pass reference

 sub printarray {
     my $array_ref = shift; ## no copy created

     foreach my $row (@$array_ref) { ## now we need to dereference
         ...
     }
 }

You can also pass a copy of array:

 printarray(@array);

 sub printarray {
     my @array_copy = @_; ## store local copy of array
     ...
 }

For more details take a look at How can I pass/return a {Function, FileHandle, Array, Hash, Method, Regex}? manual page.

And please add use strict; at the begining of programm. It'll force you to declare all variables, but will save bunch of time if you type something incorrectly.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I left out an even more important part above. I was so focused on the iteration portion that I forgot I had passed it through a subroutine... I think that's the problem. –  Magicked Sep 13 '10 at 20:58
    
That did the trick. Thank you! –  Magicked Sep 13 '10 at 21:07

When you pass the array into the subroutine, you're essentially passing in eight scalars. Then, when you do

sub printarray {
  @array = shift;

... you're popping off only the first element in the list. Try:

sub printarray {
  @array = @_;
share|improve this answer
   #!/usr/bin/perl
   use warnings;
   use strict;

   my @row1 = ( "Current Scan", "Last Month");
   my @row2 = ( "240", "0");
   my @row3 = ( "226", "209");
   my @row4 = ( "215", "207");

   my @array = (\@row1, \@row2, \@row3, \@row4);

   foreach my $row (@array) {
     foreach my $value (@$row) {
        print "$value\n";
     }
   }

This will print

  Current Scan
  Last Month
  240
  0
  226
  209
  215
  207

Not sure if that's what you wanted.

share|improve this answer

Yes, the problem is in the way you're passing the array to the subroutine. Perl flattens arrays in parameter lists. Basically, printarray(@array) is (in this example) equivalent to printarray($array[0], $array[1], $array[2], $array[3]). The shift at the beginning of printarray takes the first parameter and assigns it to @array. So no matter how big the array is, printarray only sees the first element.

share|improve this answer

Are you looking for something like this:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use warnings;
use strict;
use Algorithm::Loops 'MapCar';

my @row1 = ( "Current Scan", "Last Month");
my @row2 = ( "240", "0");
my @row3 = ( "226", "209");
my @row4 = ( "215", "207");

my @array = (\@row1, \@row2, \@row3, \@row4);

MapCar { print "Scan: $_[0]: $_[1], $_[2], $_[3]\n" } @array;
share|improve this answer

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