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I tried doing this but it didn't seem to work:

 window.onload = initAll;


    function initAll(){
    document.getElementsByTagName('a').onclick = clickHandler;
     }

    function clickHandler(){
        if(this.toString().indexOf("localhost") < 0) {
            confirmation = confirm("You are now leaving http://soso.com.  Please click 'ok' to continue to this site, or 'cancel' to stay in http://soso.com");
                if (confirmation == false){
                    return false;
                }

        }

    }

I know I can getElementById and that works, but it doesnt work this way. Any help would be appreciated.

Thanks!

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2  
Does 'document.getElementsByTagName' return an array? You may need to loop through that returned array and assign the handler? –  Danjah Sep 13 '10 at 21:52
    
JQuery was designed specifically for this sort of work. Can you use Jquery? –  StriplingWarrior Sep 13 '10 at 21:52
    
I was considering jquery to insert the onclick handler if there wasnt a simpler fix, yes. –  Graham Sep 13 '10 at 22:31
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5 Answers

document.getElementsByTagName('a') returns a NodeList of DOM Elements. So for starters, you will have to iterate over them and attach a handler to each like this :

var links = document.getElementsByTagName('a');
for( var i=0,il = links.length; i< il; i ++ ){
 links[i].onclick = clickHandler;
}

If there are many elements, I suggest you read about event delegation and assign just one handler for everything.

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4  
+1 for suggesting event delegation! –  Sean Vieira Sep 13 '10 at 21:58
    
You forgot a semicolon after the condition. –  Cristian Sanchez Sep 13 '10 at 22:13
    
@Daniel Thanks. Corrected! –  Rajat Sep 13 '10 at 22:42
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That's because getElementsByTagName returns a NodeList. You cannot assign an event handler via the onclick property on a NodeList, only a single DOMElement.

Try:

 var elems = document.getElementsByTagName('a');
 for (var i = 0; i < elems.length; i++) {
    elems[i].onclick = clickHandler;
 }
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You need to iterate over all of the elements returned by document.getElementsByTagName

var links = document.getElementsByTagName('a');
var i = links.length;
while ( i-- ) {
    links[i].onclick = clickHandler;
}
// ... rest of your code ...
share|improve this answer
    
your condition is wrong. should be i > 0. also you can combine your decrement and condition to get while ( i-- ). –  lincolnk Sep 13 '10 at 21:59
    
What about while( i-- ) { links[i].onclick = clickHandler; }? –  palswim Sep 13 '10 at 22:00
    
@lincolnk @palswim -- good points ... updated to be slightly more sensible (and work ... you know, while we're fixing things) :-) Thanks! –  Sean Vieira Sep 13 '10 at 22:08
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function initAll() 
{
    var elements = document.getElementsByTagName('a'); // returns an array

    // add the handler to each element
    var n;
    for (n = 0; n < elements.length; ++n)
        elements[n].onclick = clickHandler;
}
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3  
Replace with int with var, that is not valid Javascript. –  Cristian Sanchez Sep 13 '10 at 21:56
3  
int n; :O :O . There is no int in JavaScript. –  Rajat Sep 13 '10 at 21:57
3  
Also, you might wanna compute that length property once. It might cause serious issues in this case as getElementsByTagName returns a live list of elements. –  Rajat Sep 13 '10 at 21:57
1  
@Rajat the list is only going to change if OP specifically changes it, in which case he probably wants an up-to-date length reference. however your suggestion is a good one for optimizing a fixed-length list. –  lincolnk Sep 13 '10 at 22:04
    
fixed int -> var :) –  egrunin Sep 14 '10 at 3:01
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I'd strongly suggest using JQuery. Something like this should do the trick:

$(function(){$('a').click(clickHandler);});
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2  
While jQuery does make working with the DOM easier, including 24KB of code (minified and gzipped) on the page when 125 characters does the trick is rather overkill. ;-) –  Sean Vieira Sep 13 '10 at 21:57
1  
    
@Sean: 125 unicode characters will take 4 KB of code. Including all that code inline on your document (which is probably what he's doing) adds up to 24KB quickly over a number of page requests. If you use Google's hosted copy, you can leverage their fast, distributed servers to serve up JQuery quickly, with a high likelihood that the user will have it cached already anyway. It also means you can use JQuery anywhere else in your application to create concise, cross-browser-compatible code. Unless this is the only place he's going to use javascript, I'd say it's a no-brainer. –  StriplingWarrior Sep 13 '10 at 22:09
2  
"125 unicode characters will take 4 KB of code." You sure about that? In UTF-8 that would be 125 bytes, no? And in UTF-32, at 125 * 4 or 500 bytes. –  Cristian Sanchez Sep 13 '10 at 22:30
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