Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have some static pages in a navigation menu. I want to add a class like "current" to the item which is currently displaying.

The way I am doing so is to add tons of helper methods (each for one item) to check the controller and action.

def current_root_class
  'class="current"' if controller_name == "homepage" && action_name == "index" 
end

<ul>
  <li <%= current_root_class %>><%= link_to "Home", root_path %>

Is there any better way to do so!? My current way is so stupid......

share|improve this question

17 Answers 17

up vote 30 down vote accepted

Not truly an answer here, because I'm using quite the same way as you are. I've just defined helper methods to test for multiple controller or actions:

In application_helper.rb

  def controller?(*controller)
    controller.include?(params[:controller])
  end

  def action?(*action)
    action.include?(params[:action])
  end

Then you can use if controller?("homepage") && action?("index", "show") in your views or other helper methods…

share|improve this answer
    
Your way suit best when there are some pages handled by different controller / actions but in the same menu item, right? Have you encountered more advantages~? –  PeterWong Sep 15 '10 at 2:39
    
No more advantage except the conciseness of the syntax. I'm curious to see if someone else has a better solution. –  Yannis Sep 15 '10 at 6:26
    
I did this method with great success. Added this code to the view: <%= link_to "Users", users_path, class: (controller?("users") ? 'selected' : nil) %> Really neat that it works for both /users and /users/new. –  Andreas Feb 8 at 23:42

I made a helper called nav_link:

def nav_link(link_text, link_path)
  class_name = current_page?(link_path) ? 'current' : ''

  content_tag(:li, :class => class_name) do
    link_to link_text, link_path
  end
end

used like:

nav_link 'Home', root_path

which will produce HTML like

<li class="current"><a href="/">Home</a></li>
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the suggestion :) –  PeterWong Oct 13 '11 at 17:16
    
How would you extend this to many other classes/pages in a DRY way? Looking for an elegant answer to my question: stackoverflow.com/questions/7760050/… –  marcamillion Oct 14 '11 at 23:45
3  
This works great with twitter ootstrap if you are using the twitter bootstrap navbar twitter.github.com/bootstrap/examples/hero.html –  Lee McAlilly Feb 29 '12 at 21:58
21  
Change to class_name = current_page?(link_path) ? 'current' : nil if you don't want the class tag to show when not on current page –  Matthew Hui Sep 3 '12 at 8:55
1  
DRY as a desert –  Orlando Apr 25 at 15:44

Use the current_page? helper to determine whether or not you should assign the "current" class.

Note you can also pass a path (not only a hash of options), e.g: current_page?(root_path).

share|improve this answer
    
did not know this helper method before. It's great, thanks! –  PeterWong Aug 4 '11 at 2:54
1  
Is there way to get this to ignore query params? –  Mohamad Oct 25 '12 at 20:37

I use this nav_link(text, link) function in application_helper.rb (Rails 3) to get the job done and it rolls my bootstrap twitter 2.0 nav bar links for me.

def nav_link(text, link)
    recognized = Rails.application.routes.recognize_path(link)
    if recognized[:controller] == params[:controller] && recognized[:action] == params[:action]
        content_tag(:li, :class => "active") do
            link_to( text, link)
        end
    else
        content_tag(:li) do
            link_to( text, link)
        end
    end
end

Example:

<%=nav_link("About Us", about_path) %>
share|improve this answer
    
works great for bootstrap! –  CrazyCoderMonkey Sep 30 '12 at 3:50
    
This could be simplified by using the current_page? method, as in other answers. –  Teemu Leisti Feb 6 '13 at 11:03

The way I've done it is to add a helper function in the application_helper

def current_class?(test_path)
  return 'current' if request.request_uri == test_path
  ''
end

Then in the nav,

<%= link_to 'Home', root_path, :class => current_class?(root_path) %>

This tests the link path against the current page uri and returns either your current class or an empty string.

I've not tested this thoroughly and I'm very new to RoR (moving over after a decade with PHP) so if this has a major flaw I'd love to hear it.

At least this way you only need 1 helper function and a simple call in each link.

share|improve this answer
1  
Just a problem. I used request.path instead of request_uri (request_uri wasnt working, maybe rails version problem?). Your answer is clean and elegant in my opinion. –  Tony May 25 '12 at 22:36

To build off @Skilldrick 's answer...

If you add this code to application.js it will make sure that any dropdown menus with active children will also be marked as active...

$('.active').closest('li.dropdown').addClass('active');

To recap supportive code > Add a helper called nav_link:

def nav_link_to(link_text, link_path)
  class_name = current_page?(link_path) ? 'active' : ''

  content_tag(:li, :class => class_name) do
    link_to link_text, link_path
  end
end

used like:

nav_link_to 'Home', root_path

which will produce HTML like

<li class="active"><a href="/">Home</a></li>
share|improve this answer

I use an awesome gem called Tabs on Rails.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the suggestion. Since my nav is so simple and there's only one with little items, the gem would probably over-powered. –  PeterWong Sep 23 '10 at 5:14

The current_page? method isn't flexible enough for me (say you set a controller but not an action, then it'll only return true on the controller's index action), so I've made this based on the other answers:

  def nav_link_to(link_text, link_path, checks=nil)
    active = false
    if not checks.nil?
      active = true
      checks.each do |check,v|
        if not v.include? params[check]
          active = false
          break
        end
      end
    end

    return content_tag :li, :class => (active ? 'active' : '') do
      link_to link_text, link_path
    end
  end

Example:

nav_link_to "Pages", pages_url, :controller => 'pages'
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your answer. I think yours is similar to the accepted answer actually :) –  PeterWong Dec 30 '11 at 8:18
    
I came across this answer through Google since I was having this problem, so I thought I'd help everyone else who comes across this as well :) –  unrelativity Dec 30 '11 at 11:30

I have a more succinct version of nav_link that works exactly like link_to, but is customized to output a wrapping li tag.

Put the following in your application_helper.rb

def nav_link(*args, &block)
    if block_given?
      options      = args.first || {}
      html_options = args.second
      nav_link(capture(&block), options, html_options)
    else
      name         = args[0]
      options      = args[1] || {}
      html_options = args[2]

      html_options = convert_options_to_data_attributes(options, html_options)
      url = url_for(options)

      class_name = current_page?(url) ? 'active' : nil

      href = html_options['href']
      tag_options = tag_options(html_options)

      href_attr = "href=\"#{ERB::Util.html_escape(url)}\"" unless href
      "<li class=\"#{class_name}\"><a #{href_attr}#{tag_options}>#{ERB::Util.html_escape(name || url)}</a></li>".html_safe
    end
  end

If you look at the above code and compare it to the link_to code in url_helper.rb, the only difference is that it checks if the url is the current page, and adds the class "active" to a wrapping li tag. This is because I'm using the nav_link helper with Twitter Bootstrap's nav component which prefers links to be wrapped inside li tags and the "active" class applied to the outer li.

The nice thing about the above code is that it allows you to pass in a block into the function, just like you can do with link_to.

For example, a bootstrap nav list with icons would look like:

Slim:

ul.nav.nav-list
  =nav_link root_path do
    i.icon-home
    |  Home
  =nav_link "#" do
    i.icon-user
    |  Users

Output:

<ul class="nav nav-list">
  <li class="active">
    <a href="/">
      <i class="icon-home"/>
      Home
    </a>
  </li>
  <li>
    <a href="#">
      <i class="icon-users"/>
      Users
    </a>
  </li>
</ul>

In addition, just like the link_to helper, you can pass in HTML options into nav_link, which will be applied to the a tag.

An example of passing in a title for the anchor:

Slim:

ul.nav.nav-list
  =nav_link root_path, title:"Home" do
    i.icon-home
    |  Home
  =nav_link "#", title:"Users" do
    i.icon-user
    |  Users

Output:

<ul class="nav nav-list">
  <li class="active">
    <a href="/" title="Home">
      <i class="icon-home"/>
      Home
    </a>
  </li>
  <li>
    <a href="#" title="Users">
      <i class="icon-users"/>
      Users
    </a>
  </li>
</ul>
share|improve this answer
    
Awesome. For me this was the most viable option exactly because it allows blocks. Thanks a ton! –  Kasperi Feb 22 at 8:14

Yep! Check out this article: A Better Way to Add a ‘selected’ Class to Links in Rails

Drop nav_link_helper.rb into app/helpers and it can be as easy as:

<%= nav_link 'My_Page', 'http://example.com/page' %>

The nav_link helper works just like the standard Rails link_to helper, but adds a 'selected' class to your link (or its wrapper) if certain criteria are met. By default, if the link's destination url is the same url as the url of the current page, a default class of 'selected' is added to the link.

There's a gist here: https://gist.github.com/3279194

UPDATE: This is now a gem: http://rubygems.org/gems/nav_link_to

share|improve this answer
    
This is nice. I took into use, and added a modification to support giving a class name to the unselected elements, also, as a comment in the gist. –  Teemu Leisti Feb 6 '13 at 14:09
    
This is now a gem: rubygems.org/gems/nav_link_to –  Dan Tello Jul 10 '13 at 21:17

I use a simple helper like this for top level links so the /stories/my-story page highlights the /stories link

def nav_link text, url

  active = (url == request.fullpath || (url != '/' && request.fullpath[0..(url.size-1)] == url))

  "<li#{ active ? " class='selected'" : '' }><a href='#{url}'>#{text}</a></li>".html_safe

end
share|improve this answer

Let me show my solution:

_header.html.erb:

  <ul class="nav">
    <%= nav_tabs(@tabs) %> 
  </ul>

application_helper.rb:

 def nav_tabs(tabs=[])
    html = []
    tabs.each do |tab| 
      html << (content_tag :li, :class => ("current-page" if request.fullpath.split(/[\??]/)[0] == tab[:path]) do
        link_to tab[:path] do
          content_tag(:i, '', :class => tab[:icon]) +
          tag(:br) +
          "#{tab[:name]}"
        end
      end)        
    end

    html.join.html_safe
  end

application_controller.rb:

before_filter :set_navigation_tabs

private
def set_navigation_tabs
  @tabs = 
    if current_user && manager?
      [
        { :name => "Home", :icon => "icon-home", :path => home_index_path },
        { :name => "Portfolio", :icon => "icon-camera", :path => portfolio_home_index_path },
        { :name => "Contact", :icon => "icon-envelope-alt", :path => contact_home_index_path }
      ]
    elsif current_user && client?
      ...
    end
share|improve this answer

I think the best way is

application_helper.rb:

def is_active(controller, action)       
  params[:action] == action && params[:controller] == controller ? "active" : nil        
end

And in menu:

<li class="<%= is_active('controller', 'action') %>">
share|improve this answer
    
is it okay to leave a blank class"" like that? –  Harsha M V Jun 20 at 16:02

all these work with simple nav bars, but what about drop down sub-menu ? when a sub-menu is selected the top menu item should be made 'current' in this case tabs_on_rails me be the solution

share|improve this answer

This is how I solved in my current project.

def class_if_current_page(current_page = {}, *my_class)
    if current_page?(current_page)
      my_class.each do |klass|
        "#{klass} "
      end
    end
  end

Then..

li = link_to company_path 
    class: %w{ class_if_current_page( { status: "pending" }, "active" ), "company" } do  
      Current Company
share|improve this answer

According to the answer by Skilldrick, I'll change it to the following:

def nav_link(*args, &block)
  is_active = current_page?(args[0]) || current_page?(args[1])
  class_name = is_active ? 'active' : nil

  content_tag(:li, class: class_name) do
    link_to *args, &block
  end
end

to make it much more useful.

share|improve this answer

I know it is a out dated answer, but you can easily ignore all these current page check by using a link_to helper wrapper, called active_link_to gem, it works exactly what you want, add a active class to current page link

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.