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Is it possible to use Mark of the Web in XML file which is parsed by a local XSL file?

When I insert MOTW mark:

<!-- saved from url=(0014)about:internet -->

i get following message:
Access is Denied. Error Processing Resource.


Ok, I see that I was trying to do it wrong - I wanted to insert this comment into XML.

I have three files: XML with data, XSL to transform the data into html, and JS file with JavaScript functions. As you said, I want to get rid of the Internet Explorer orange bar.

Putting everything on IIS or Apache is good way, but I want to open these files localy.

I tried to insert xml:comment tag, but nothing happened (the bar is still showing).

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From the looks of it - no. MOTW here forces the "Internet" Zone upon the whole process, so accessing local resources is off limits. The error message you get expresses this fact.

If testing your page is what you try to do, you will have to fetch it from a web server, alongside with the XSL. The IIS on your machine, accessed through "http:/localhost/..." would be good enough.

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Adding the MOTW (Mark of the web) will only help you when loading a local page with JavaScript to not see the silly yellow warning bar. (AFAIK)

If this is your intention, can you not just use:

<xsl:comment> saved from url=(0014)about:internet </xsl:comment>

as the output just before your DOCTYPE / html tag.

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I've tried several variations of <xsl:comment> saved from url=(0014)about:internet </xsl:comment>. The MOTW just doesn't work for pages generated through XSLT.

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