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When I run a C++ program that creates an output file and writes something, the output file is not created, although the program works fine when I simply double click it from Windows Explorer.

This is the C# code I use to run the program:

            try
            {
                Process p = StartProcess(ExecutableFileName);
                p.Start();
                p.WaitForExit();
                Log("Program finished in " + ((p.ExitTime - p.StartTime).Milliseconds / 1000m) + " seconds with code " + p.ExitCode + "\n");
            }
            catch
            {
                Log("The program couldn't be started.");
            }

UPDATE

I just found out why it's happening.

Apparently, when I launch it with C#, the C++ program doesn't see the input file in the relative directory, but when I explicitly specify it

ifstream in("C:\\Alex\\primes.in");

it gets it and everything works! Now I need to make it work with relative file paths...

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Do you get an exception? –  Darin Dimitrov Sep 14 '10 at 6:26
    
Did you try setting the UseShellExecute property to true? –  Ani Sep 14 '10 at 6:27
    
Is the file created using an absolute path or a relative? –  Patrick Sep 14 '10 at 6:28
1  
Silly, but double check what exactly the current directory is when you call the application (dump/trace System.Environment.CurrentDirectory). Perhaps, it is not what you think, and the output file is actually there. –  Roman Kuzmin Sep 14 '10 at 7:10
1  
For debugging: you can specify the process startup directory, see the project settings (set it to the directory where your C++ app is). For production... there are a number of ways, it depends on your design. There is not enough information to give the right answer, I afraid. –  Roman Kuzmin Sep 14 '10 at 7:50

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here is the summary of our discussion of the problem. It turned out that the output file was in the C# program's debug folder, not in the directory where the C++ application was and the output was expected. The problem is solved by specifying the Working directory property of the project.

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You must call Close() on process like so:

            try
            {
                Process p = StartProcess(ExecutableFileName);
                p.Start();
                p.WaitForExit();

                //THIS HERE
                p.Close();                    

                Log("Program finished in " + ((p.ExitTime - p.StartTime).Milliseconds /1000m) + " seconds with code " + p.ExitCode + "\n");


            }
            catch
            {
                Log("The program couldn't be started.");
            }
share|improve this answer
    
Still, the process can't read/write information from/to files in the same directory correctly... –  Alex Sep 14 '10 at 6:59
1  
How are you starting it? You must provide absolute paths to the files you want to read/write... well I tried to help. =) –  Cipi Sep 14 '10 at 7:10
1  
What is the value of ExecutableFileName? –  Cipi Sep 14 '10 at 7:14
    
Yes, the path to the process is absolute –  Alex Sep 14 '10 at 7:33
    
No the path to the process, but the paths to the files. If you must use relative file paths, you can set p.StartInfo.WorkingDirectory = "C:\\My Dir"; attribute, so relative paths get calculated relative to the working dir. –  Cipi Sep 14 '10 at 7:54

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