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gcc 4.4.3 c89

I have some functions that initialize some hardware and return either true or false. If false then I have to uninitialize in the reverse order.

However, my code is looking very untidy with all the if statements.

For example each function can return either true of false. This is a sample. As you can see the code looks very untidy. I am just looking for any advice on how I can clean it up to make it more manageable and if possible scable?

Many thanks for any advice,

if(init_A() == TRUE) {
 if(init_B() == TRUE) {
  if(init_C() == TRUE) {
   if(init_D() == TRUE) {
    if(init_E() == TRUE) {
     /* ALL STARTED OK */    
    }
    else {
     uninit_A();
     uninit_B();
     uninit_C();   
     uninit_D();    
    }
   }
   else {
    uninit_A();
    uninit_B();
    uninit_C();   
   }
  }
  else {
   uninit_A();
   uninit_B();
  }
 }
 else {
  /* Failed to initialize B */
  uninit_B(); 
 }
}
else {
 /* Failed to start */
}
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1  
So if you reach ALL STARTED OK, you're never going to uninit things? –  GManNickG Sep 14 '10 at 7:49
1  
I may be wrong, but shouldn't the 2nd last else have uninit_A(), not uninit_B()? –  user191776 Sep 14 '10 at 8:02
3  
At the risk of being slaughters by the C++ haters: This is the kind of problem where C++ easily out-shines it's ancestor. –  sbi Sep 14 '10 at 8:29
2  
One reason already that it looks so untidy is your use of pre-historic booleans. So first I'd include "stdbool." and use bool, true and false. And then, bool_condition == TRUE or bool_condition == true really hurts my eyes. –  Jens Gustedt Sep 14 '10 at 9:25
1  
@Jens: Yes, dtors are called in the reverse order of ctors, and only for fully constructed objects, this perfectly fits these kinds of problems. –  sbi Sep 14 '10 at 9:52
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10 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

This is quite a common problem, where the "init" steps correspond to things like malloc() or lock(), and the "uninit" steps correspond to things like free() and unlock(). It is particularly an issue when resources have to be deallocated in strictly the reverse order in which they were allocated.

This is one case where the use of goto is justified:

int somefunc()
{
    int retval = ERROR;

    if (init_A() != TRUE)
        goto out_a;

    if (init_B() != TRUE)
        goto out_b;

    if (init_C() != TRUE)
        goto out_c;

    if (init_D() != TRUE)
        goto out_d;

    if (init_E() != TRUE)
        goto out_e;

    /* ALL STARTED OK */
    /* ... normal processing here ... */
    retval = OK;

    uninit_E();
  out_e:
    uninit_D();
  out_d:
    uninit_C();
  out_c:
    uninit_B();
  out_b:
    uninit_A();
  out_a:
    return retval;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is exactly how I do it, an example: code.google.com/p/cpfs/source/browse/cpfs.c#1379 –  Matt Joiner Sep 14 '10 at 13:38
add comment
if(init_A() != TRUE) {
    goto EndA;
}
if(init_B() != TRUE) {
    goto EndB;
}
if(init_C() != TRUE) {
    goto EndC;
} 
if(init_D() != TRUE) {
    goto EndD;
}
if(init_E() != TRUE) {
    goto EndE;
} 
...
return;
EndE: uninitD();
EndD: uninitC();
EndC: uninitB();
EndB: uninitA();
EndA: return;
share|improve this answer
    
I did think about using goto statements. However, I have always tried to avoid them. Thanks. –  ant2009 Sep 14 '10 at 7:44
4  
@robUK, @Jacob - I say, use the right tool for the task, without prejudice. –  adamk Sep 14 '10 at 7:45
4  
+1: Retains the logic, reduces duplication (of uninit calls), improves readability and has the courage to use goto in the face of the inevitable goto police. –  Charles Bailey Sep 14 '10 at 7:45
3  
"Exception handling" is one of the very few places in C that goto is sometimes permissible (in my opinion, of course). –  Matthew Sep 14 '10 at 7:49
1  
+1 I just don't like the return before the EndX labels. –  pmg Sep 14 '10 at 10:07
show 2 more comments

I would loop through an array of function pointers, call the functions in the loop, then if that function returned false, perform the corresponding uninit_* function.

Here's an example:

void (*inits[5]) (void);
void (*uninits[4]) (void);

int main(void) {
   inits[0] = init_A;
   inits[1] = init_B;
   inits[2] = init_C;
   inits[3] = init_D;
   inits[4] = init_E;

   uninits[0] = uninit_A;
   uninits[1] = uninit_B;
   uninits[2] = uninit_C;
   uninits[3] = uninit_D;

   for(int i = 0; i < 5; i++) {
      if((*inits[i])() != TRUE) {
         int j = (i < 4) ? i : 4; 
         while(j--) {
             (*uninits[j])();
         }
         break;
      }
   }
   return 1;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Actually it's more complicated than it looks. He needs to call uninit_* for every preceding function in the array if any current function returns false. –  Daniel Sloof Sep 14 '10 at 7:43
    
@Daniel, I will provide an example soon. Hint: I will be using two arrays of function pointers, with corresponding indices. –  Jacob Relkin Sep 14 '10 at 7:44
    
@Jacob. The way the hardware works is to initialize everything first. and when you want to shutdown uninitalize in the reverse order. However, it one function fails to initialize then I have to uninitialize starting from the function that failed. Thanks. –  ant2009 Sep 14 '10 at 7:48
    
@robUK, I revised my answer –  Jacob Relkin Sep 14 '10 at 8:02
    
@Jacob, I think you beat me to that revised answer by like a minute :( –  Daniel Sloof Sep 14 '10 at 8:15
show 3 more comments
BOOL a = FALSE, b = FALSE, c = FALSE, d = FALSE, e = FALSE;

if ( (a = init_A())  &&  (b = init_B())  &&  (c = init_C())  && (d = init_D())  && (e = init_E()) )
{
}
else
{
    if ( e ) uninit_E();
    if ( d ) uninit_D();
    if ( c ) uninit_C();
    if ( b ) uninit_B();
    if ( a ) uninit_A();
}

uninit functions are called in direct order, as in your code. If reverse order is required, just change this.

share|improve this answer
    
Do all implementations check the ANDed expression from Left to Right, & stop on zero? I thought the system may evaluate ALL the ANDed expressions before moving on. –  user191776 Sep 14 '10 at 8:06
2  
@crypto: Logical AND (and logical OR) must be evaluated from left to right, because they have short-circuit behaviour: if the left side fully determines the final outcome, the right side must be skipped completely. –  Bart van Ingen Schenau Sep 14 '10 at 8:19
    
@Bart van Ingen Schenau, thanks for the insight! –  user191776 Sep 14 '10 at 8:34
    
Wrong, && has higher precedence than =. –  domen Sep 15 '10 at 8:04
add comment

If your uninit_* functions can detect whether or not they need to do anything you can simply:

if (!init_A() || !init_B() || !init_C() || !init_D() )
{
  uninit_C();
  uninit_B();
  uninit_A();
  return FALSE;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is the most clean solution here. imo –  Erik Sep 14 '10 at 11:00
add comment

Is that "reverse order"? For me reverse order is like this:

void uninit(int from) {
    switch (from) {
        /* ... */
        case 3: uninit_C(); /* fall_through */
        case 2: uninit_B(); /* fall_through */
        case 1: uninit_A(); /* fall_through */
        case 0: break;
    }
}

And the init process would go like this

    int count = 0;
    if (init_A()) {
        count++;
        if (init_B()) {
            count++;
            if(init_C()) {
                count++;
                if(init_D()) {
                    count++;
                    if(init_E()) {
                        count++;
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }
    if (count == 5) /* ALL OK */;
    uninit(count);
share|improve this answer
    
I forgot a default in the switch statement. –  pmg Sep 14 '10 at 8:49
add comment

Limited understanding of C at work here, if you do decide to downvote, please tell me why.

#include <stdio.h>

int init_a() { return 1; }; // succeed
int init_b() { return 1; }; // succeed
int init_c() { return 0; }; // fail

void uninit_a() { printf("uninit_a()\n"); }
void uninit_b() { printf("uninit_b()\n"); }
void uninit_c() { printf("uninit_c()\n"); }

typedef struct _fp {
        int (*init)();
        void (*uninit)();
} fp;

int init() {
        fp fps[] = {
                (fp){&init_a, &uninit_a},
                (fp){&init_b, &uninit_b},
                (fp){&init_c, &uninit_c}
        };

        unsigned int i = 0, j;
        for(; i < sizeof(fps) / sizeof(fp); ++i) {
                if(!(*fps[i].init)()) {
                        for(j = 0; j < i; ++j) {
                                (*fps[j].uninit)();
                        }
                        return -1;
                }
        }
        return 0;
}

int main() {
        init();
        return 0;
}

Output:

uninit_a()
uninit_b()

This is the same order that the code in original post would be executed in, but you may want to reverse it (inner loop).

share|improve this answer
1  
This is way too complicated IMO. The code may work but it's hard to read without thinking hard about it. Other solutions presented here are much easier to understand. –  Bryan Oakley Sep 14 '10 at 19:49
    
I think you can call (*fps[i].init)() as fps[i].init(), same for uninit, and you don't need the cast to (fp) in the initialisation, but I'm too much of a coward when it comes to C to just edit it in :) –  Marc Mutz - mmutz May 5 '11 at 17:04
add comment

What you perhaps are looking for is "scope bound resource management". C++ traditionally does that with constructors/destructors. But there is a way to do that differently (in C99 as well as in C++) by abusing the for-statement a bit. I wrote something up upon this line here: scope bound resource management with for scopes.

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I've not got a compiler to try this out. But something like this might work?

int (*init[])() = {init_A, init_B, init_C, init_D, init_E};
int (*uninit[])() = {uninit_A, uninit_B, uninit_C, uninit_D, uninit_E};

int main()
{
  initfunction(init, 0)
  return 0;
}

void initfunction((*init[])(), pos)
{
  if(init[pos]() == TRUE)
    initfunction(init, pos++)
  else
    return;

  uninit[pos]();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Once this reaches the end of your init array; you'll have to decide what to do. –  Steven Keith Sep 14 '10 at 8:17
add comment
int X = 0;
if(init_A() == TRUE) {
  X++;
  if(init_B() == TRUE) {
    X++;
    if(init_C() == TRUE) {
      X++;
      if(init_D() == TRUE) {
        X++;
        if(init_E() == TRUE) {
          X++;
          /* ALL STARTED OK */    
        }
      }
    }
  }
}

/* You said reverse order which I took to mean this,
 * though your did not do it this way. */
switch (X) {
  case 5:
      return SUCCESS;
  case 4:
    uninit_D();
  case 3:
    uninit_C();
  case 2:
    uninit_B();
  case 1:
    uninit_A();
    return FAILURE;
}

Something I find myself doing to prevent myself from making errors in code like this is:

static int do_A(void);
static int do_B(void);
static int do_C(void);
static int do_D(void);

static int do_A(void) {
   if (init_A() == FALSE) {
      return FALSE;
   }
   if (do_B() == FALSE) {
      uninit_A();
      return FALSE;
   }
   return TRUE;
}    

...

static int do_D(void) {
    return init_D();
}

All of the other do_ functions should look similar to do_A.

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