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I have this code:

    string get_md5sum(unsigned char* md) {
        char buf[MD5_DIGEST_LENGTH + MD5_DIGEST_LENGTH];
        char *bptr;
        bptr = buf;
        for(int i = 0; i < MD5_DIGEST_LENGTH; i++) {
                bptr += sprintf(bptr, "%02x", md[i]);
        }
        bptr += '\0';
        string x(buf);
        return x;
}

Unfortunately, this is some C combined with some C++. It does compile, but I don't like the printf and char*'s. I always thought this was not necessary in C++, and that there were other functions and classes to realize this. However, I don't completely understand what is going on with this:

 bptr += sprintf(bptr, "%02x", md[i]);

And therefore I don't know how to convert it into C++. Can someone help me out with that?

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2  
There's a very dangerous "off-by-one" bug lurking here. The size of buf should be MD5_DIGEST_LENGTH + MD5_DIGEST_LENGTH + 1 to account for the terminating NUL inserted by sprintf. I don't know how that corresponds to C++. –  pmg Sep 14 '10 at 7:55
1  
Note that the same trailing \0 would be inserted by *bptr += '\0';. The current statement bptr += '\0'; is also a no-op. Really, that is two bugs in one line. –  MSalters Sep 14 '10 at 8:52
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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

sprintf returns number of bytes written. So this one writes to bptr two bytes (value of md[i] converted to %02x -> which means hex, padded on 2 chars with zeroes from left), and increases bptr by number of bytes written, so it points on string's (buf) end.

I don't get the bptr += '\0'; line, IMO it should be *bptr = '\0';

in C++ it should be written like this:

using namespace std;
stringstream buf;
for(int i = 0; i < MD5_DIGEST_LENGTH; i++)
{
    buf << hex << setfill('0') << setw(2) << static_cast<int>(static_cast<unsigned char>(md[i])); 
}
return buf.str();

EDIT: updated my c++ answer

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I agree. It writes two bytes to bptr and advances bptr two bytes. The next line, bptr += '\0';, seems to make no sense. I think it adds 0 to bptr, instead of appending a nul character. What do you think about it? –  Sjoerd Sep 14 '10 at 7:52
    
Oh, that was stupid.. I remembered the \0 from previous C and C++ books. I barely needed to use this because I usually work with libraries like Qt and .NET. I guess I added it somewhere to hope I was doing something to create a good char array. –  henk Sep 14 '10 at 8:04
    
And do I really need to write two bytes each time or can I just write the whole array to a string at once? The unsigned char* is filled by openssl: unsigned char* tmp = MD5((unsigned char*) buffer, length, result); –  henk Sep 14 '10 at 8:07
    
And by trying to compile your answer, I get this:md5.cpp: In function ‘std::string get_md5sum(unsigned char*)’: md5.cpp:24:25: error: no matching function for call to ‘fill(char)’ md5.cpp:24:37: error: ‘width’ was not declared in this scope –  henk Sep 14 '10 at 8:12
2  
md[i] is already an unsigned char, redundant cast. I would just write int(md[i]); C++ constructor-style cast. –  MSalters Sep 14 '10 at 8:54
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bptr += sprintf(bptr, "%02x", md[i]);

This is printing the character in md[i] as 2 hex characters into the buffer and advancing the buffer pointer by 2. Thus the loop prints out the hex form of the MD5.

bptr += '\0';

That line is probably not doing what you want... its adding 0 to the pointer, giving you the same pointer back...

I'd implememt this something like this.

string get_md5sum(unsigned char* md) {
        static const char[] hexdigits="0123456789ABCDEF";
        char buf[ 2*MD5_DIGEST_LENGTH ];
        for(int i = 0; i < MD5_DIGEST_LENGTH; i++) {
                bptr[2*i+0] = hexdigits[ md[i] / 16 ];
                bptr[2*i+1] = hexdigits[ md[i] % 16 ];
        }
        return string(buf,2*MD5_DIGEST_LENGTH );
}
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I don't know C++, so without using pointers and strings and stuff, here's a (almost) pseudo-code for you :)

    for(int i = 0; i < MD5_DIGEST_LENGTH; i++) {
            buf[i*2] = hexdigits[(md[i] & 0xF0) >> 4];
            buf[i*2 + 1] = hexdigits[md[i] & 0x0F];
    }
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Why post an almost identical (but less complete) solution as Michael? Why start an answer to a question specifically requesting a solution in C++ with 'I don't know C++'. Are you just hoping to get lucky? –  Andreas Magnusson Sep 14 '10 at 8:44
2  
I din't see Michael's answer when I posted mine, and there was no other answer without pointers (which seem to be problematic to the original poster) at the time I posted mine. And not knowing C++ does not prevent one from explaining how a piece of C works. –  pmg Sep 14 '10 at 8:48
    
Not knowing C++ only prevents you from answering the original question, 'How do I convert this code to c++?'. Anyway sorry about complaining that your solution is next to identical to Michael's, I guess the hexdigits[] made it look like a copy since it's not a name in the original code but it exists in Michael's. –  Andreas Magnusson Sep 14 '10 at 14:21
    
No worries ... now that I think better about it, Michael had already supplied his answer and the hexdigit thing is a copy of his; but he had pointer arithmetic rather than indexes (2*i+1) in his code. –  pmg Sep 14 '10 at 14:49
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