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I can't use high order functions. I just can't see to figure out how to do this. I am very new to haskell. It also has to be recursive.

split :: [Int] -> ([Int],[Int])
split xs = 

I am given this to start with. I honestly don't even know where to start with this problem.

Examples:

split []
([],[])

split [1]
([1],[])

split [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10]
([1,3,5,7,9],[2,4,6,8,10])

any help would be much appreciated.

Edit: Its even and odd positions.

So

split [3,6,8,9,10] would be ([3,8,10],[6,9])

ok so i came up with this. Its not pretty, but it seems to work ok.

split :: [Int] -> ([Int],[Int])
split [] = ([],[])
split [xs] = ([xs],[])
split xs = (oddlist xs, evenlist xs)

oddlist :: [Int] -> ([Int])
oddlist xs | length xs <= 2 = [head(xs)]
           | otherwise = [head(xs)] ++ oddlist(tail(tail(xs)))

evenlist :: [Int] -> ([Int])
evenlist xs | length xs <= 3 = [head(tail(xs))]
            | otherwise = [head(tail(xs))] ++ evenlist(tail(tail(xs)))
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3  
Your example is a bit ambiguous, do you mean elements at even and odd positions, or integers that are themselves even or odd? A better example might be: split [1,3,2,5,8] ~> ([1,3,5], [2,8]) –  Tom Lokhorst Sep 14 '10 at 9:53
    
Oh yea sorry, elements at even and odd positions. –  Matt Sep 14 '10 at 10:18
    
@Tom hey thanks. Did not notice that. –  Matt Sep 14 '10 at 10:44

4 Answers 4

up vote 16 down vote accepted
split [] = ([], [])
split [x] = ([x], [])
split (x:y:xs) = (x:xp, y:yp) where (xp, yp) = split xs
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Your signature is slightly off … –  Konrad Rudolph Sep 14 '10 at 9:52
    
@Konrad: I don't know what you mean. The two ??? are not the same, and I have ignored 2 base cases. –  kennytm Sep 14 '10 at 9:59
    
forget it … I’m apparently out of touch with Haskell for too long. See original answer by me: missing parentheses around list constructor. –  Konrad Rudolph Sep 14 '10 at 10:09
    
@Konrad: Right, a function taking a single argument is never curried ;-) –  Tom Lokhorst Sep 14 '10 at 10:10

If you’re not allowed to use higher-order list functions, your alternative is basically to use recursion.

The examples already give the cases that you need to cater to:

-- Base case:
split [] = …

-- Recurrence:
split (x : xs) = (do something with x) … (split xs) …
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Note that @Kenny’s and my solution solve different problems. As @Tom has commented below your question, it’s not clear which of the two solutions suits your exact problem since your example is ambiguous. –  Konrad Rudolph Sep 14 '10 at 10:17

I think it is related to Get every Nth element.

Anyway, this is what I would do:

ghci> let split ys = let skip xs = case xs of { [] -> [] ; [x] -> [x] ; (x:_:xs') -> x : skip xs' } in (skip ys, skip . drop 1 $ ys)
ghci> split [1..10]
([1,3,5,7,9],[2,4,6,8,10])

Or nicely formatted:

split xs = (skip xs, skip . drop 1 $ xs)
  where 
  skip [] = []
  skip [x] = [x]
  skip (x:_:xs') = x : skip xs'
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Since you've put your solution up now, this is how I would implement it:

split xs = (everyother 0 xs, everyother 1 xs)
      where everyother _ []     = []
            everyother 1 (x:xs) = everyother 0 xs
            everyother 0 (x:xs) = x : (everyother 1 xs)

This implies that the first item in a list is item 0.

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Yea, thats nice. interesting idea. –  Matt Sep 14 '10 at 11:40

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