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This is kind of basic but I can't seem to get a hold on this one. Reference here

Are void *p and const void *p sufficiently different? Why would a function use const void * instead of void *?

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1  
Sufficiently different for what? –  Konrad Rudolph Sep 14 '10 at 10:11
    
what i mean is that does it make sense to have something as 'const void *'? –  Chubsdad Sep 14 '10 at 10:13
2  
Yes, it's a pointer to an immutable object of unknown type. –  Mike Seymour Sep 14 '10 at 10:24

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The reason to use void* at all (whether const or not) is the kind of genericity it provides. It's like a base class: All pointers are void* and can implicitly cast into it, but casts from void* to typed pointers have to be done explicitly and manually.

Usually, C++ has better ways to offer to do this (namely OO and templates), so it doesn't make much sense to use void* at all, except when you're interfacing C. However, if you use it, then const offers just what it offers elsewhere: you need an (additional) const_cast to be able to change the object referred to, so you are less likely to change it accidentally.

Of course, this relies on you not employing C-style casts, but explicit C++ casts. The cast from void* to any T* requires a static_cast, and this doesn't allow removing of const. So you can cast const void* to const char* using static_cast, but not to char*. This would need an additional const_cast.

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Nice answer, but I think this is not what's asked. It is the difference between the const and non const version. –  Diego Sevilla Sep 14 '10 at 10:18
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I believe cast from void * to T * requires static_cast. reinterpret_cast is always implementation defined and should be avoided. –  Tadeusz Kopec Sep 14 '10 at 10:21
    
I think OP knows the meaning of const, he is just saying that he does not understand what to make of a const void specifically. So I think this is a good answer. And a good use of reinterpret_cast, by the way. –  Gorpik Sep 14 '10 at 11:27
    
Interesting answer! –  Chubsdad Sep 14 '10 at 11:33
    
@Diego: I thought I had written that a const void* is useful for the same reason any other const is useful: to prevent accidental changes to an object. To be honest, I'm somewhat at a loss as to how to state this more explicitly. Could you please elaborate? –  sbi Sep 14 '10 at 13:05

In c++ a const in front of a pointer says the data at the pointer's address should not be changed. i.e. it stops someone doing this:

int v1 = 3;
int v2 = 4;
const int *pv = &v1;
pv = &v2 // ok;
*pv = 5; // error

You can also make the pointer value itself a const:

int v1 = 3;
int v2 = 4;
int * const pv = &v1;
*pv = 5; // ok
pv = &v2; // error

You can also combine the two:

int v1 = 3;
int v2 = 4;
const int * const pv = &v1;
*pv = 5; // error
pv = &v2; // error
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There is a simple difference. As other stated, there is little need to use void* in C++ due to its better type system, templates, etc. However, when interfacing to C or to system calls, you sometimes need a way to specify a value without a known type.

As you ask, the difference between void* and const void* is a hint to show you if the contents of the pointed memory will be modified within the function you're calling, the const meaning it will have a read-only access.

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