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Alright, so without going into detail on why I'm writing this class, here it is.

template<class aType>
  class nArray
  {
  public:
   aType& operator[](int i)
   {
    return Array[i];
   }
   nArray()
   {
    aType * Array = new aType[0];
    _Size = 0;
    _MaxSize = 0;
    _Count = 0;
   }
   nArray(int Count)
   {
    aType * Array = new aType[Count*2]();
    _Size = Count;
    _MaxSize = Count * 2; 
    _Count = 0;
   }

   int Resize(int newSize)
   {
    aType *temp = new aType[newSize*2];
    for(int i=0;i<_Count;i++)
    {
     temp[i] = Array[i];
    }
    delete[] Array;
    aType * Array = new aType[newSize*2];
    for(int i=0;i<_Count;i++)
    {
     Array[i] = temp[i];
    }
    delete [] temp;
    _Size = newSize;
    _MaxSize = newSize*2;
    return 0;
   }
   int Push_Back(aType Item)
   {
    if(_Count+1 >= _Size)
    {
     Resize(_MaxSize);
    }
    Array[_Count] = Item;
    _Count++;
    return _Count - 1;
   }
   aType GetAt(int Index, int &ret)
   {
    if(Index > _Size-1)
     ret = 1;
     return aType();
    ret = 0;
    return Array[Index];
   }
  private:
   int _Size;
   int _Count;
   int _MaxSize;
   aType * Array;
  };

It is supposed to be a std::Vector type object, without all the bells and whistles. Problem is, it doesn't seem to work.

I basically start by going

nArray<string> ca = nArray<string>(5);
ca.Push_Back("asdf");
ca.Push_Back("asdf2");
int intret = 0;
cout << ca.GetAt(1,intret);

I get an Access Violation Reading Location error and it hits on the line

Array[_Count] = Item 

in the Push_back function.

The problem seems to be that it's not treating the Array object as an array in memory.

I've spent time going through the code step by step, and I don't know what else to say, it's not operating right. I don't know how to word it right. I'm just hoping someone will read my code and point out a stupid mistake I've made, because I'm sure that's all it amounts to. Update So now I changed 3 initializations of Array in nArray(), nArray(int Count), and Resize(int newSize)

    template<class aType>
    class nArray
    {
    public:
        aType& operator[](int i)
        {
            return Array[i];
        }
        nArray()
        {
            Array = new aType[0];
            _Size = 0;
            _MaxSize = 0;
            _Count = 0;
        }
        nArray(int Count)
        {
            Array = new aType[Count*2]();
            _Size = Count;
            _MaxSize = Count * 2; 
            _Count = 0;
        }

        int Resize(int newSize)
        {
            aType *temp = new aType[newSize*2];
            for(int i=0;i<_Count;i++)
            {
                temp[i] = Array[i];
            }
            delete[] Array;
            Array = new aType[newSize*2];
            for(int i=0;i<_Count;i++)
            {
                Array[i] = temp[i];
            }
            delete [] temp;
            _Size = newSize;
            _MaxSize = newSize*2;
            return 0;
        }
        int Push_Back(aType Item)
        {
            if(_Count+1 >= _Size)
            {
                Resize(_MaxSize);
            }
            Array[_Count] = Item;
            _Count++;
            return _Count - 1;
        }
        aType GetAt(int Index, int &ret)
        {
            if(Index > _Size-1)
                ret = 1;
                return aType();
            ret = 0;
            return Array[Index];
        }
    private:
        int _Size;
        int _Count;
        int _MaxSize;
        aType * Array;
    };

This is how my code was before. Anyway, the original problem was the fact that when I try to access a specific element in the array, it just accesses the first element, and it doesn't seem to add elements eather. It doesn't seem to be treating Array as an array.

share|improve this question
2  
"It doesn't seem to work" isn't enough information. Can you please explain what you did, what result you expected to get and what you actually got? Thanks. –  moonshadow Sep 14 '10 at 10:54
1  
may I ask what "bells and whistles" you are trying to avoid to necessitate this class? I still think you will be more productive to just use std::vector. –  tenfour Sep 14 '10 at 11:02
1  
There are some helpful answers, so here's another unproductive comment: instead of having a custom class, because you didn't want to start from vector, you now have a lot of issues. See stackoverflow.com/questions/3563591/… as an example. –  stefaanv Sep 14 '10 at 11:18
2  
Another unproductive comment: _Size, _MaxSize and _Count are reserved symbols. It's best to avoid beginning any name with _. And I'm with the others: I don't know what "bells and whistles" you're trying to avoid, but your class is larger than std::vector, uses memory less efficiently, imposes more conditions on the object type, and leaks memory, in addition to the bugs you're asking about. –  Mike Seymour Sep 14 '10 at 11:38
2  
@kelton52: what do the number of code lines have to do with anything? It's more compact (I've no idea why you have three different sizes; vector just has size and capacity), more efficient at runtime (since it doesn't do your bizarre double-reallocation dance, and doesn't allocate twice as much memory as it lets you use), doesn't require objects to be default-constructible (by separating memory allocation from object creation), and has a destructor to free memory (as well as a copy constructor and assignment operator to make that work). Also, it's been thoroughly debugged already. –  Mike Seymour Sep 14 '10 at 11:50
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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted
   int Resize(int newSize)
   {
    .
    .
    aType * Array = new aType[newSize*2];

At this point, instead of updating the member variable as you intended, you've actually created a local variable called Array whose value is discarded when you exit from Resize(). Change the line to

    Array = new aType[newSize*2];

The same thing is happening in your constructors, they also need changing accordingly. Moreover, since the default constructor allocates an array, you should set the size members accordingly. You have too many of these: an array needs to keep track of current element count and maximum capacity, however you appear to have three members. What is the purpose of the third? Redundant information is bad, it makes code difficult to read and without a single point of truth it is easier to make mistakes.

With the code in Resize(), you can do better: the second copy is completely redundant.

   int Resize(int newSize)
   {
    aType *temp = new aType[newSize*2];
    for(int i=0;i<_Count;i++)
    {
     temp[i] = Array[i];
    }
    delete[] Array;
    Array = temp;
    _Size = newSize;
    _MaxSize = newSize*2;
    return 0;
   }

Also, in

aType GetAt(int Index, int &ret)
        {
            if(Index > _Size-1)
                ret = 1;
                return aType();
            ret = 0;
            return Array[Index];
        }

you need curly braces around body of the if(), just indentation on its own won't do the trick:

aType GetAt(int Index, int &ret)
        {
            if(Index > _Size-1)
            {
                ret = 1;
                return aType();
            }
            ret = 0;
            return Array[Index];
        }
share|improve this answer
    
That's how I had the resize function, but it wasn't working, so I changed it because I wasn't sure how it was copying the class. That's why it is so drawn out. –  kelton52 Sep 14 '10 at 11:17
    
_Size is the current size the array tells the user it has available..._MaxSize is the maximum size before realocatting..._Count is the actual number of elements. –  kelton52 Sep 14 '10 at 11:19
    
haha, yeah...Sometimes that slips my mind when I switch from a single line after the if. Doesn't fix the problem though. –  kelton52 Sep 14 '10 at 11:20
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I think the answer after the changes is in moonshadow's reply:

    aType GetAt(int Index, int &ret)
    {
        if(Index > _Size-1)
            ret = 1;
            return aType();
        ret = 0;
        return Array[Index];
    }

This code will always return aType(), the last two lines will never be reached.

You might also want to check what happens if you start out with a default-constructed nArray. (Hint: you call Resize(_MaxSize); but what is the value of _MaxSize in this case?


Edit: This outputs "asdf2" for me as it should be (with the initialization and the braces fixed):

template<class aType>
class nArray
{
public:
    aType& operator[](int i)
    {
        return Array[i];
    }
    nArray()
    {
        Array = new aType[0];
        _Size = 0;
        _MaxSize = 0;
        _Count = 0;
    }
    nArray(int Count)
    {
        Array = new aType[Count*2]();
        _Size = Count;
        _MaxSize = Count * 2;
        _Count = 0;
    }

    int Resize(int newSize)
    {
        aType *temp = new aType[newSize*2];
        for(int i=0;i<_Count;i++)
        {
            temp[i] = Array[i];
        }
        delete[] Array;
        Array = new aType[newSize*2];
        for(int i=0;i<_Count;i++)
        {
            Array[i] = temp[i];
        }
        delete [] temp;
        _Size = newSize;
        _MaxSize = newSize*2;
        return 0;
    }
    int Push_Back(aType Item)
    {
        if(_Count+1 >= _Size)
        {
            Resize(_MaxSize);
        }
        Array[_Count] = Item;
        _Count++;
        return _Count - 1;
    }
    aType GetAt(int Index, int &ret)
    {
        if(Index > _Size-1) {
            ret = 1;
            return aType();
        }
        ret = 0;
        return Array[Index];
    }
private:
    int _Size;
    int _Count;
    int _MaxSize;
    aType * Array;
};

#include <string>
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    nArray<string> ca = nArray<string>(5);
    ca.Push_Back("asdf");
    ca.Push_Back("asdf2");
    int intret = 0;
    cout << ca.GetAt(1,intret);
}
share|improve this answer
    
It's defininatly not complete. I was a little into designing it and I realized that it's not treating Array as an array. I have already corrected the curly brace problem, but I still have the same result. –  kelton52 Sep 14 '10 at 20:48
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Your array is not initialized by the constructors and resize function (working on local vars instead).

And is there a reason you want to store instances of string and not pointers to string (string *) ?

share|improve this answer
    
Because I want to be able to destroy the strings and pass the array around. –  kelton52 Sep 14 '10 at 11:16
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You have a number of problems. At a guess, the one causing problems so far is that your default ctor (nArray::nArray()) defines a local variable named Array that it initializes, which leaves nArray::Array uninitialized.

Though you probably haven't seen any symptoms from it (yet), you do have at least one more problem. Names starting with an underscore followed by a capital letter (such as your _Size, _MaxSize, and _Count) are reserved for the implementation -- i.e., you're not allowed to use them.

The logic in your Resize also looks needlessly inefficient (if not outright broken), though given the time maybe it's just my brain not working quite right at this hour of the morning.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah I thought the resize function had problems so I drug it out quit a bit to follow what was going on. I also changed the Array initialization in 3 functions to the aType * Array from just Array, because I thought that would solve my original problem, but I guess this gets rid of my memory issues. –  kelton52 Sep 14 '10 at 11:09
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