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In C you can easily initialize an array using the curly braces syntax, if I remember correctly:

int* a = new int[] { 1, 2, 3, 4 };

How can you do the same in Fortran for two-dimensional arrays when you wish to initialize a matrix with specific test values for mathematical purposes? (Without having to doubly index every element on separate statements)

The array is either defined by

real, dimension(3, 3) :: a

or

real, dimension(:), allocatable :: a
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3 Answers 3

up vote 15 down vote accepted

You can do that using reshape and shape intrinsics. Something like:

INTEGER, DIMENSION(3, 3) :: array
array = reshape((/ 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 /), shape(array))

But remember the column-major order. The array will be

1   4   7
2   5   8
3   6   9

arter reshaping.

So to get

1   2   3
4   5   6
7   8   9

one need also transpose intrinsic:

array = transpose(reshape((/ 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 /), shape(array)))

For more general example (allocatable 2D array with different dimensions) one need size intrinsic:

PROGRAM main

  IMPLICIT NONE

  INTEGER, DIMENSION(:, :), ALLOCATABLE :: array

  ALLOCATE (array(2, 3))

  array = transpose(reshape((/ 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 /),                            &
    (/ size(array, 2), size(array, 1) /)))

  DEALLOCATE (array)

END PROGRAM main
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8  
1) Most compilers now accept the Fortran 2003 notation [] to initialize arrays, instead of the somewhat awkward (/ /). 2) For simple cases you can omit transpose by providing the values in the column-major order: array = reshape ( [1, 4, 7, 2, 5, 8, 3, 6, 9 ], shape (array) ) –  M. S. B. Sep 14 '10 at 13:01
    
I forgot to mention that we're required to work in Fortran 90. –  Fludlu McBorry Sep 14 '10 at 17:36
3  
@FludluMcBorry - Finally, people started putting F90 as a requirement :) –  ldigas Dec 8 '11 at 23:43

Array initialization can be done in the array declaration statement itself, as shown below:

program test
 real:: x(3) = (/1,2,3/)
 real:: y(3,3) = reshape((/1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9/), (/3,3/))
 integer:: i(3,2,2) = reshape((/1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12/), (/3,2,2/))

end program test

It surprises me that

 real:: y(3,3) = (/(/1,2,3/),(/4,5,6/),(/7,8,9/)/)

is not accepted by the compiler (tried g95, gfortran). It turns out that the shape of (/(/1,2,3/),(/4,5,6/),(/7,8,9/)/) is 9 and not 3 3!

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If you want to initialize an array (superior to rank 1) upon declaration, you can use equivalence:

real*8,dimension(9)::ArrayOfRank1=(/1,0,0,0,1,0,0,0,1/)
real*8,dimension(3,3)::ArrayOfRank2
equivalence(ArrayOfRank1,ArrayOfRank2)

I think this is useful if you want something more compact.
I don't think that you can use the reshape technique directly after the variable declaration if you have other variables.

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-1: this is a horrible solution. While equivalence may have some remaining applications, here it is, as it usually is in C21, a horrible hack. –  High Performance Mark Jun 23 at 8:21

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