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I got the answer: It's very simple.

DateTimeFormatter fmt = DateTimeFormat.forPattern("MM/dd/yyyy");
String formattedDate = jodeLocalDateObj.toString( fmt );
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3 Answers

While the answer you've found will work, I prefer to look at it the other way round, in terms of which object is "active" (in terms of formatting) and which is just providing data:

LocalDate localDate = new LocalDate(2010, 9, 14);
DateTimeFormatter formatter = DateTimeFormat.forPattern("MM/dd/yyyy");
String formattedDate = formatter.print(localDate);
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LocalDate's toString can take a format string directly, so you can skip creating the DateTimeFormatter:

String formattedDate = myLocalDate.toString("MM/dd/yyyy");

http://joda-time.sourceforge.net/apidocs/org/joda/time/LocalDate.html#toString(java.lang.String)

I also wrote a post about it on my blog - http://codetutr.com/2013/03/05/joda-time-how-to-parse-a-string-to-joda-localdate/

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DateTimeFormatter fmt = DateTimeFormat.forPattern("MM/dd/yyyy");
String formattedDate = jodeLocalDateObj.toString( fmt );
share|improve this answer
add comment

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