Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm having trouble building the correct regex for my string. What I want to do is get all entities from my string; they start and end with '. The entities are identifiable by an amount of numbers and a # in front. However, entities (in this case a phone number starting with #) that don't start or end with ' should not be matched at all.

I hope someone can help me, or at least tell me that what I want to do isn't possible in one regex. Thanks :)

String:

'Blaa lablalbl balbla balb lbal '#39'blaaaaaaaa'#39' ('#39#226#8218#172#39') blaaaaaaaa #7478347878347834 blaaaa blaaaa'

RegEx:

'[#[0-9]+]*'

Wanted matches:

  • '#39'
  • '#39'
  • '#39'
  • '#226'
  • '#8218'
  • '#172'
  • '#39'

Found matches:

  • '#39'
  • '#39'
  • '#39#226#8218#172#39' <- Needs to be split(if possible in the same RegEx)

Another RegEx:

#[0-9]+

Found matches:

  • '#39'
  • '#39'
  • '#39'
  • '#226'
  • '#8218'
  • '#172'
  • '#39'
  • '#7478347878347834' <- Should not be here :(

Language: C# .NET (4.0)

share|improve this question
1  
Why is '#7478347878347834' not allowed? – Florian Peschka Sep 14 '10 at 13:06
1  
What regexp language? – gnarf Sep 14 '10 at 13:06
    
@ApoY2k Because it's not directly surrounded by ' character, I guess. Possibly (probably?) wrong, though. – jensgram Sep 14 '10 at 13:11
    
#7478347878347834 is not allowed because it is part of the string and thus not an entity. – Willy Sep 14 '10 at 13:13
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Assuming you can use lookbehind/lookaheads and that your regexp supports variable length lookbehinds (JGSoft / .NET only)

(?<='[#0-9]*)#\d+(?=[#0-9]*')

Should work... Tested it using this site and got these results:

   1. #39
   2. #39
   3. #39
   4. #226
   5. #8218
   6. #172
   7. #39

Breaking it down is pretty simple:

(?<=        # Start positive lookbehind group - assure that the text before the cursor
            # matches the following pattern: 
  '         # Match the literal '
  [#0-9]*   # Matches #, 0-9, zero or more times
)           # End lookbehind...
#\d+        # Match literal #, followed by one or more digits
(?=         # Start lookahead -- Ensures text after cursor matches (without advancing)
  [#0-9]*   # Allow #, 0-9, zero or more times
  '         # Match a literal '
)

So, this pattern will match #\d+ if the text before it is '[#0-9]* and the text after is [#0-9]*'

share|improve this answer
    
Wow, that works perfect! Exactly what I was looking for. Could you explain what this does exactly? Thanks alot :) – Willy Sep 14 '10 at 13:20
    
You sir, are KING! – Willy Sep 14 '10 at 13:42
    
@Willy - Honestly though -- I voted for @Jan's answer.. It is WAY easier to understand what you are doing there... – gnarf Sep 14 '10 at 13:43
    
You are correct sir. It IS alot easier to understand, but I wanted to do it in one RegEx if possible, which is what your method does :). Which method would be faster and better performance wise? – Willy Sep 14 '10 at 13:56
    
@Willy - It's hard to say which method will perform better (especially since I don't have a .NET compiler), you should setup some sort of profiling testing to see... – gnarf Sep 14 '10 at 18:56

You cannot do this in one regex, you'll need two:

First take all matches that are between single quotes:

'[\d#]+'

Then over all those matches, do this:

#\d+

So you'll end up with something like (in C#):

foreach(var m in Regex.Matches(inputString, @"'[\d#]+'"))
{
    foreach(var m2 in Regex.Matches(m.Value, @"#\d+"))
    {
          yield return m2.Value;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Too bad that it isn't possible in one RegEx, guess this'll have to do. Thanks for typing it out for me aswell ;) – Willy Sep 14 '10 at 13:17
    
Gnarf posted an answer that does it in one RegEx, thank though! – Willy Sep 14 '10 at 13:22

As you don't specify a language, here is a solution in perl :

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;
use Data::Dumper;

my $s = qq!Blaa lablalbl balbla balb lbal '#39'blaaaaaaaa'#39' ('#39#226#8218#172#39') blaaaaaaaa #7478347878347834 blaaaa blaaaa!;

my @n = $s =~ /(?<=['#\d])(#\d+)(?=[#'\d])/g;

print Dumper(\@n);

Output :

$VAR1 = [
          '#39',
          '#39',
          '#39',
          '#226',
          '#8218',
          '#172',
          '#39'
        ];
share|improve this answer
    
I had no idea that RegEx was language specific, the RegEx bit works universally right? This does the trick aswell, #\d+(?=#|'). Thanks! Your RegEx is alot shorter then the one Gnarf posted, what are the differences? – Willy Sep 14 '10 at 13:24
    
His only tests that the character following the match is a # or ' -- and not all regular expressions can handle lookahead, lookbehind, etc. If you put a # after #7478347878347834 in your test string, it would then match that as well... – gnarf Sep 14 '10 at 13:30
    
Tested, you are right :) – Willy Sep 14 '10 at 13:42
    
@gnarf: Yes, you're right, i've updated the regex, adding a lookbehind of fix length because variable length lookaround isn't allowed in perl and in some other languages. – Toto Sep 14 '10 at 13:58

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.