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I have table witch contains fields: id, parent_id, name (etc.)

i want to order this table in "tree travel order" ie.

id  parent_id
1,  0
3,  1
5,  1

2,  0
8,  2

4,  0
9,  4

(...)

in short describe: take root node, append all children, take next root node append children etc.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 9 down vote accepted

By your description I assume you mean breadth-first order, which could be easly done using a WITH RECURSIVE query (PostgreSQL 8.4+):

WITH RECURSIVE tree 
AS 
(
    SELECT 
        node_name, id, parent_id, NULL::varchar AS parent_name 
    FROM foo 
    WHERE parent_id IS NULL 
    UNION
    SELECT 
        node_name, f1.id, f1.parent_id, tree.node_name AS parent_name 
    FROM 
        tree 
        JOIN foo f1 ON f1.parent_id = tree.id
) 
SELECT node_name, empno, parent_id, node_name FROM tree;

You could also use depth-first order using the following SQL:

WITH RECURSIVE tree 
AS 
(
    SELECT 
        node_name, id, parent_id, NULL::varchar AS parent_name, id::text AS path 
    FROM foo WHERE parent_id IS NULL 
    UNION
    SELECT 
        node_name, f1.id, f1.parent_id, tree.node_name AS parent_name, tree.path || '-' || f1.id::text AS path 
    FROM 
        tree 
        JOIN foo f1 ON f1.parent_id = tree.id
) 
SELECT node_name, empno, parent_id, node_name, path FROM tree ORDER BY path;
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Thx for that, i was not aware of existing WITH queries in Postgres –  canni Sep 15 '10 at 8:16
    
I think we can not use UNION statement in WITH clause –  Fer May 3 '13 at 11:40
    
Your solution for depth-first order won't work for id's with different number of digits. –  synergetic Jun 27 at 14:21

This article discussed hierarchical data structures in relational databases. It talks specifically about MySQL, but is rather generic in fact. It was very helpful for me.

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As noticed by synergetic, the solution for depth-first order provided by Diogo Biazus won't work for id's with different number of digits.

But you can use this solution instead, that uses arrays of integer :

WITH RECURSIVE tree 
AS 
(
    SELECT 
        node_name, id, parent_id, NULL::varchar AS parent_name, array[id] AS path 
    FROM foo WHERE parent_id IS NULL 
    UNION
    SELECT 
        node_name, f1.id, f1.parent_id, tree.node_name AS parent_name, tree.path || f1.id AS path 
    FROM 
        tree 
        JOIN foo f1 ON f1.parent_id = tree.id
) 
SELECT node_name, empno, parent_id, node_name, path FROM tree ORDER BY path;
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SELECT * FROM table ORDER BY id,parent_id

That should order my columns in the order there placed within the query.

Unless you mean GROUP the items, witch I think you do, then use

SELECT * FROM table ORDER BY id GROUP BY parent_id

And i also advise you to read this article: http://mikehillyer.com/articles/managing-hierarchical-data-in-mysql/

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That will not produce results in order i want... –  canni Sep 14 '10 at 13:29
    
This will produce syntax error in Postgres (id field must be used in aggregate function), this is not MySQL :) –  canni Sep 14 '10 at 13:33
    
Ahh ok, sorry, I thought that would have worked under postgres, im not as good with it. –  RobertPitt Sep 14 '10 at 13:34
    
Would this work under psotgress SELECT * FROM table ORDER BY id || id ASC, parent_id ASC ? –  RobertPitt Sep 14 '10 at 13:36
    
this produces: ERROR: operator does not exist: integer || integer ; || is string catenation operator in postgres –  canni Sep 14 '10 at 13:37

You can also use the excellent LTree module, but you need to reorganise your data a bit.

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