Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

There are products with a name and price.

Users log about products they have bought.

# option 1: embed logs
product = { id, name, price }
user = { id, 
         name,
         logs : [{ product_id_1, quantity, datetime, comment },
                 { product_id_2, quantity, datetime, comment },
                 ... ,
                 { product_id_n, quantity, datetime, comment }] 
}

I like this. But if product ids are 12 bytes long, quantity and datetime are 32-bit (4 bytes) integers and comments 100 bytes on average, then the size of one log is 12+4+4+100 = 120 bytes. The maximum size of a document is 4MB, so maximum amount of logs per user is 4MB/120bytes = 33,333. If assumed that a user logs 10 purchases per day, then the 4MB limit is reached in 33,333/10 = 3,333 days ~ 9 years. Well, 9 years is probably fine, but what if we needed to store even more data? What if the user logs 100 purchases per day?

What is the other option here? Do I have to normalize this fully?

# option 2: normalized
product = { id, name, price }
log = { id, user_id, product_id, quantity, datetime, comment }
user = { id, name }

Meh. We are back to relational.

share|improve this question
    
Why do you need 12 bytes for a product ID? Maybe you can use a 32-bit (or less) sequence? –  diederikh Sep 14 '10 at 13:59
    
You can also move the comments to a separate collection and reference the comments by id. –  diederikh Sep 14 '10 at 14:04
    
Oh, nice.. so manually generate the ids by auto-incrementing? Where would you store the last assigned id value? –  randomguy Sep 14 '10 at 14:04
    
@Diederik, moving the comments out would be a huge deal! But I guess it would require doing two queries to get logs and their comments. –  randomguy Sep 14 '10 at 14:08

2 Answers 2

if the size is the main concern, you can go ahead with option 2 with mongo DbRef.

     logs : [{ product_id_1, quantity, datetime, comment },
             { product_id_2, quantity, datetime, comment },
             ... ,
             { product_id_n, quantity, datetime, comment }] 

and embed this logs inside user using Dbref, something like

       var log = {product_id: "xxx", quantity:"2", comment:"something"}
       db.logs.save(log)
       var user= { id:"xx" name : 'Joe', logs : [ new DBRef('logs ', log._id) ] }
       db.users.save(user)
share|improve this answer

Yes, option 2 is your best bet. Yes, you're back to a relational model, but then, your data is best modeled that way. I don't see a particular downside to option 2, its your data that is requiring you to go that way, not a bad design process.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.