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Something like:

var jsonString = '{ "Id": 1, "Name": "Coke" }';

//should be true
IsJsonString(jsonString);

//should be false
IsJsonString("foo");
IsJsonString("<div>foo</div>")

EDIT: The solution should not contain try/catch. Some of us turn on "break on all errors" and they don't like the debugger breaking on those invalid Json strings.

share|improve this question
    
Good call Mike B. I ended up doing what Mic said but it was before that answer came up. I marked Gumbo as answer at the time since the clue was hidden in the comment of that answer. I went ahead and reverted the answer and marked Mic's as answer to better reflect on what I actually ended up doing. –  Chi Chan Feb 21 '13 at 19:28
3  
Is there a valid reason to not use try? –  Nick T Aug 13 '13 at 6:12
1  
@NickT Because if you turn on "break on all errors" in the debugger, it will. Chrome now has the option of breaking on uncaught errors tho. –  Chi Chan Aug 13 '13 at 14:00
    
For those curious, here is how the V8 engine does its JSON Parsing: v8.googlecode.com/svn/trunk/src/json-parser.h –  A T Sep 7 at 7:57

8 Answers 8

up vote 32 down vote accepted

Have a look around the line 450 in https://github.com/douglascrockford/JSON-js/blob/master/json2.js

There is a regexp that check for a valid JSON, something like:

if (/^[\],:{}\s]*$/.test(text.replace(/\\["\\\/bfnrtu]/g, '@').
replace(/"[^"\\\n\r]*"|true|false|null|-?\d+(?:\.\d*)?(?:[eE][+\-]?\d+)?/g, ']').
replace(/(?:^|:|,)(?:\s*\[)+/g, ''))) {

  //the json is ok

}else{

  //the json is not ok

}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Mic, This is what I ended up doing, except I left the "if (cx.test(text))" before the regexp check. –  Chi Chan Sep 14 '10 at 15:55
11  
This is only checking if the code is safe for eval to use. For example the following string '2011-6-27' would pass that test. –  SystemicPlural Jul 27 '11 at 16:22
    
@SystemicPlural, yes but the question was about not using try/catch –  Mic Jul 25 '13 at 10:33
    
1  
-1 Not really correct a answer. –  Petr Peller May 27 at 14:41

Use a JSON parser like JSON.parse:

function IsJsonString(str) {
    try {
        JSON.parse(str);
    } catch (e) {
        return false;
    }
    return true;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, but I just ran this with the team and they want something that doesn't use try/catch. The question is edited along with a new title. Sorry about that. –  Chi Chan Sep 14 '10 at 15:26
3  
Get it at json.org/json2.js. It does not use try / catch. You can modify the code to replace the throw statements. –  Mark Lutton Sep 14 '10 at 15:27
    
Good call Mark! json2.js is free to copy and modify too! –  Chi Chan Sep 14 '10 at 15:47
1  
Hm... Strange... I used this example and it works fine for me (JSON object from PHP's json_encode passes as valid), but it doesn't work for the example in question: { "Id": 1, "Name": "Coke" }. It returns false for me. –  trejder Sep 29 '12 at 9:16
2  
@trejder: it does that because 1 is not a string, try it with "1" –  Purefan Mar 4 at 23:47

I know i'm 3 years late to this question, but I felt like chiming in.

While Gumbo's solution works great, it doesn't handle a few cases where no exception is raised for JSON.parse({something that isn't JSON})

I also prefer to return the parsed JSON at the same time, so the calling code doesn't have to call JSON.parse(jsonString) a second time.

This seems to work well for my needs:

function tryParseJSON (jsonString){
    try {
        var o = JSON.parse(jsonString);

        // Handle non-exception-throwing cases:
        // Neither JSON.parse(false) or JSON.parse(1234) throw errors, hence the type-checking,
        // but... JSON.parse(null) returns 'null', and typeof null === "object", 
        // so we must check for that, too.
        if (o && typeof o === "object" && o !== null) {
            return o;
        }
    }
    catch (e) { }

    return false;
};
share|improve this answer
3  
+1 for something that handles nulls and numbers –  Yarin Dec 18 '13 at 14:19
1  
Of the answers on the page, this is the most robust and reliable. –  Jonline May 30 at 17:07
    
+1 for late but still a great tip. Three more up-votes needed... ;) –  hex494D49 Jul 31 at 14:26

in prototype js we have method isJSON. try that

http://api.prototypejs.org/language/string/prototype/isjson/

even http://www.prototypejs.org/learn/json

"something".isJSON();
// -> false
"\"something\"".isJSON();
// -> true
"{ foo: 42 }".isJSON();
// -> false
"{ \"foo\": 42 }".isJSON();
share|improve this answer
6  
Thanks, but I think using the prototype library to do this is a little overkilled. –  Chi Chan Sep 14 '10 at 15:29
3  
You gave FOUR examples but only THREE results. What is the result for "{ foo: 42 }".isJSON()? If false, as I assume (result should follow function it document), then good question is, why it is false? { foo: 42 } seems to be perfectly valid JSON. –  trejder Sep 29 '12 at 9:58
2  
@trejder Unfortunately, the JSON spec requires quoted keys. –  mikermcneil Oct 8 '12 at 1:27
2  
And "2002-12-15".isJSON returns true, while JSON.parse("2002-12-15") throws an error. –  ychaouche Nov 13 '12 at 17:14
1  
I think the better answer here would be to pull that function out of the prototype library and place it here. Especially since api.prototypejs.org/language/string/prototype/isjson is 404. –  jcollum May 28 '13 at 17:53

You can use the javascript eval() function to verify if it's valid.

e.g.

var jsonString = '{ "Id": 1, "Name": "Coke" }';
var json;

try {
  json = eval(jsonString);
} catch (exception) {
  //It's advisable to always catch an exception since eval() is a javascript executor...
  json = null;
}

if (json) {
  //this is json
}

Alternatively, you can use JSON.parse function from json.org:

try {
  json = JSON.parse(jsonString);
} catch (exception) {
  json = null;
}

if (json) {
  //this is json
}

Hope this helps.

WARNING: eval() is dangerous if someone adds malicious JS code, since it will execute it. Make sure the JSON String is trustworthy, i.e. you got it from a trusted source.

Edit For my 1st solution, it's recommended to do this.

 try {
      json = eval("{" + jsonString + "}");
    } catch (exception) {
      //It's advisable to always catch an exception since eval() is a javascript executor...
      json = null;
    }

To guarantee json-ness. If the jsonString isn't pure JSON, the eval will throw an exception.

share|improve this answer
    
First example using eval says that "<div>foo</div>" is valid JSON. It may work differently in different browsers, but it appears that in FireFox, eval() accepts XML. –  Mark Lutton Sep 14 '10 at 15:26
    
Thank you, but I just ran this with the team and they want something that doesn't use try/catch. The question is edited along with a new title. Sorry about that. –  Chi Chan Sep 14 '10 at 15:26
    
@Mark Lutton, the object type won't be of JSON but of XML Dom Document (I forgot what the exact type in firefox is). –  Buhake Sindi Sep 14 '10 at 15:30
    
@Chi Chan. You can use option 2 without using try/catch. Without using try/catch you basically allowing harm to come to your program. –  Buhake Sindi Sep 14 '10 at 15:32
1  
This is pure eval. –  Chris Nov 19 '13 at 20:45

Maybe it will useful:

    function parseJson(code)
{
    try {
        return JSON.parse(code);
    } catch (e) {
        return code;
    }
}
function parseJsonJQ(code)
{
    try {
        return $.parseJSON(code);
    } catch (e) {
        return code;
    }
}

var str =  "{\"a\":1,\"b\":2,\"c\":3,\"d\":4,\"e\":5}";
alert(typeof parseJson(str));
alert(typeof parseJsonJQ(str));
var str_b  = "c";
alert(typeof parseJson(str_b));
alert(typeof parseJsonJQ(str_b));

output:

IE7: string,object,string,string

CHROME: object,object,string,string

share|improve this answer
function get_json(txt)
{  var data

   try     {  data = eval('('+txt+')'); }
   catch(e){  data = false;             }

   return data;
}

If there are errors, return false.

If there are no errors, return json data

share|improve this answer
1  
In the question: "The solution should not contain try/catch". –  Pescis Mar 6 '13 at 3:58
1  
Why? This is guaranteed way... Would be foolish to disuse! I'm sorry for not know English. I used Google Translate –  user2138283 Mar 6 '13 at 23:32

I prefere this way :

if (!typeof arg == 'object') {
    //Not JSon
} else {
    //Json
}
share|improve this answer
    
The question is asking how to tell if a string is valid JSON (so could be converted into an object). Your test requires that you already have an object (and, as a small aside, it's much easier for others to understand your code if you write negative statements as e.g.: typeof arg !== 'object') –  Matt McDonald Jul 19 '13 at 16:14
    
Hum.. Not an object. It's the test... Don't understand your comment. I use this code and it's working very nicely. –  Portekoi Jul 19 '13 at 19:42
2  
At the moment, whatever you send to your function as the value of arg it will say it's JSON because it's incorrect. So if arg is 'foo bar' or if arg is { foo:'bar' } your test will say it's JSON. If you fixed your code, and had if( typeof arg !== 'object' ) then your test will say that { foo: bar } is JSON, but it will say that '{ foo: bar }' is not JSON (which it isn't! but the original question was asking how to tell if a string was valid JSON) –  Matt McDonald Jul 20 '13 at 12:01

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