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I want to do something like:

SELECT * 
  FROM db.table 
 WHERE COUNT(someField) > 1

how do I do this in MySql.

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6 Answers 6

up vote 63 down vote accepted

Use the HAVING, not WHERE clause, for aggregate result comparison.

Taking the query at face value:

SELECT * 
  FROM db.table 
HAVING COUNT(someField) > 1

Ideally, there should be a GROUP BY defined for proper valuation in the HAVING clause, but MySQL does allow hidden columns from the GROUP BY...

Is this in preparation for a unique constraint on someField? Looks like it should be...

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Needs a GROUP BY surely (unless this is some MySQL non standard thing)? –  Martin Smith Sep 14 '10 at 15:47
    
@Martin Smith: Took the query at face value; addressed GROUP BY issue (incl. hidden columns feature). –  OMG Ponies Sep 14 '10 at 15:50
    
"Looks like it should be..." Why? I am in need of education on this :) –  Dave Sep 14 '10 at 15:51
    
So this will return the whole table if it contains more than 2 non null someField values or an empty result set if it doesn't. –  Martin Smith Sep 14 '10 at 15:52
    
@Dave: If you were in a position where you had to periodically check & correct bad data, wouldn't you want to stop the situation from happening in the first place? MySQL implements a unique constraint as an index - for more info see the CREATE INDEX documentation –  OMG Ponies Sep 14 '10 at 15:56

You can also do this with a self-join:

SELECT t1.* FROM db.table t1
JOIN db.table t2 ON t1.someField = t2.someField AND t1.pk != t2.pk
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SELECT username, numb from(
Select username, count(username) as numb from customers GROUP BY username ) 
WHERE numb > 3
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2  
the only caveat here (at least in 5.1.46-community MySQL Community Server (GPL)) is that "Every derived table must have its own alias", that will make you sql look like: SELECT username, numb from( Select username, count(username) as numb from customers GROUP BY username ) as my_table WHERE numb > 3 –  D_K Aug 10 '12 at 11:57

One way

SELECT t1.* 
FROM db.table t1
WHERE exists 
      (SELECT *
      FROM db.table t2 
      where t1.pk != t2.pk 
      and t1.someField = t2.someField)
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As OMG Ponies stated, the having clause is what you are after. However, if you were hoping that you would get discrete rows instead of a summary (the "having" creates a summary) - it cannot be done in a single statement. You must use two statements in that case.

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Not entirely true - use the GROUP BY to manipulate what the HAVING is using. –  OMG Ponies Sep 14 '10 at 15:48

It should also be mentioned that the "pk" should be a key field. The self-join

SELECT t1.* FROM db.table t1
JOIN db.table t2 ON t1.someField = t2.someField AND t1.pk != t2.pk 

by Bill Karwin give you all the records that are duplicates which is what I wanted. Because some have more than two, you can get the same record more than once. I wrote all to another table with the same fields to get rid of the same records by key fields suppression. I tried

SELECT * FROM db.table HAVING COUNT(someField) > 1

above first. The data returned from it give only one of the duplicates, less than 1/2 of what this gives you but the count is good if that is all you want.

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2  
This is not really an answer. –  Alex Thornton Mar 1 at 20:10

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