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How do i assign a numerical value to each uppercase letter, and then use it later via string and then add up the values.

EG.

A = 1, B = 2, C = 3 (etc..)

string = 'ABC'

Then return the answer 6 (in this case).

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9 Answers 9

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You can use ord to get the ascii code, then subtract 64.

def codevalue(char):
    return ord(char) - 64
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Excellent! That does 90% of what i want, and i can figure out the rest on my own. Thanks. –  moreisee Sep 14 '10 at 17:26
4  
Better yet, subtract ord('A'). –  DonaldRay Sep 14 '10 at 17:27
2  
I don't see why that's better. That will give the wrong result, but if it's popular, so be it I guess. –  recursive Sep 14 '10 at 17:29
6  
Subtract ord('A') and then add back 1. The beauty of this is that it gets rid of the magic number 64, which is mysterious to those who have not memorized the ASCII table, but ord('A') is obvious what you are doing. –  Paul McGuire Sep 14 '10 at 19:19
1  
What about magic number 1? :) –  monoid Jul 14 '13 at 2:47
base = ord('A') - 1
mystring = 'ABC'
print sum(ord(char) - base for char in mystring)
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import string

letter_to_numeral = dict(zip(string.uppercase, range(1, len(string.uppercase) + 1) ))

print letter_to_numeral
>>> {'A': 1, 'C': 3, 'B': 2, 'E': 5, 'D': 4, 'G': 7, 'F': 6, 'I': 9, 'H': 8, 'K': 11, 'J': 10, 'M': 13, 'L': 12, 'O': 15, 'N': 14, 'Q': 17, 'P': 16, 'S': 19, 'R': 18, 'U': 21, 'T': 20, 'W': 23, 'V': 22, 'Y': 25, 'X': 24, 'Z': 26}

def score_string(s):
    return sum([letter_to_numeral[character] for character in s])


score_string('ABC')
>>> 6
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Enumerate can do the numbering for you:

import string
numerology_table = dict((ch,num+1) 
                         for (num,ch) in enumerate(string.ascii_letters[:26].upper()))

or even better, you can have enumerate start at 1 instead of the default of 0:

numerology_table = dict((ch,num) 
                         for (num,ch) in enumerate(string.ascii_letters[:26].upper(),
                                                   start=1))
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def getvalue(mystring):
    letterdict = dict(zip('ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ',range(1,27)))
    return sum(letterdict[c] for c in mystring)
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If you are using Python3:

result = 0
mystring = 'ABC'
for char in mystring.encode('ascii'):
    result += char - 64

>>> result
6
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Golfy answer certain to annoy your professor:

>>> s = 'ABC'
>>> sum(map(ord,s),-64*len(s))
6
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The most sensible answer is of course using ord as shown earlier. But for those who chose to construct a dictionary, I would rather just use the index in the string:

>>> import string
>>> mystring = 'ABC'
>>> sum(string.uppercase.index(c) + 1 for c in mystring)
6
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After you define the variables you can just return the answer or print the answer A = 1 B = 2 C = 3 total = A + B + C print (total) return total

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