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When it comes to using statements in C# (not to be confused with using directives that import namespaces), Visual Studio doesn't indent single-line code that follows if no braces are employed. This is typical of "nesting" using statements as shown in this SO question.

I find it confusing that subsequent statements after using are not indented, unlike the formatting of an if statement:

// non-indented using statement
using (var myResource = new SomeIDisposableResource())
myResource.Indent(false);

// indented if statement
if (something == true)
    IndentMe();

Is there any reason not to indent, or is it just preference?

// indented using statement, but not the default VS formatting
using (var myResource = new SomeIDisposableResource())
    myResource.Indent();

EDIT:

Further testing reveals that I was incorrect about some of the VS formatting behavior. If you type a using statement:

using (var myResource = SomeIDisposableResource())

...and hit enter, the cursor will align with using. If the next line is also a using statement, it will continue to align. If it is not, VS will indent it upon completion. Thus my original question is somewhat invalidated, because my first example is not really achievable unless you override the default formatting or use an IDE that doesn't do that.

Still, it is worth knowing that multiple using statements are best treated as a single block because they technically are. The lack of indentation only applies when the statements are sequential using statements without braces; and as one gets used to it, they stop looking so unusual.

As always thanks to all those who answered for the insight and experience in even these minor programming details.

share|improve this question
    
I don't get it. Can you show examples of both styles? The question you linked to shows indented code... with curlies... –  R. Martinho Fernandes Sep 14 '10 at 17:32
    
@Martinho Fernandes: Added examples as requested. –  JYelton Sep 14 '10 at 17:35
1  
Works fine on my machine, it indents as soon as I type ;. I did override the default settings though. –  Hans Passant Sep 14 '10 at 18:32
    
It indents by default. Even if you carefully remove the indentation, clicking Format Document restores it. –  Steven Sudit Sep 14 '10 at 18:36
    
If you insist on skipping the braces I would stick the using statement and the myResource.Indent() call on the same line. Though I prefer braces in this case. I don't particularly mind if (something == true) IndentMe(); as a one-liner, though. –  Brian Sep 14 '10 at 19:07

5 Answers 5

up vote 22 down vote accepted

As others have said, always use braces. However, there's one idiom which somewhat goes against this and uses the "non-indentation":

using (Resource1 res1 = new Resource1())
using (Resource2 res2 = new Resource2())
using (Resource3 res3 = new Resource3())
{
    // Do stuff with res1, res2 and res3
}

But I'd always use braces for the innermost block :)

share|improve this answer
    
Good call, I forgot about multiple using statements on top of each other. –  Kevin Sep 14 '10 at 17:37
    
The stack of using statements seems to go against my model of code dependencies. By that, I mean that I view indented code as being dependent on the preceding block with one less indent. Inserting some code between the using statements would seem okay based solely on formatting, but unless I am wrong, it would break the association between the statements. I guess this is just one of the occasional exceptions to the rule? –  JYelton Sep 14 '10 at 17:52
    
If you're inserting code between two lines, presumably you're looking at those lines. –  recursive Sep 14 '10 at 17:58
    
@JYelton: Yes, it's an exception - I rarely find myself doing it anyway, to be honest, but it's useful to know about. Basically I mentally treat all the using statements as a block of them. –  Jon Skeet Sep 14 '10 at 18:05
    
If we're going to allow stacking, then I'm not sure why we need the braces. –  Steven Sudit Sep 14 '10 at 18:07

It's preference. I always indent, and place the necessary items in brackets

using(var t = new t())
{
   t.Foo();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Even for single lines? I presume the braces then just force VS to indent according to your preference? –  JYelton Sep 14 '10 at 17:33
7  
+1 even for single lines. –  user7116 Sep 14 '10 at 17:33
2  
Yes, I even put it for single lines. It's preference, but I have run into too many situations where someone accidentally comments or deletes something and an if statement extends it's control beyond where it should. Sometimes its a massive headache that causes hours of debugging. I follow the explicitly clear and better safe than sorry principle. –  Kevin Sep 14 '10 at 17:36
    
@Kevin: Makes sense, thanks for the insight. –  JYelton Sep 14 '10 at 17:45
    
Kevin, were any of these situations in C# as opposed to C++ or C? –  Steven Sudit Sep 14 '10 at 18:37

Easy fix: always use explicit blocks, even for single lines. Visual Studio will then properly indent, and as a bonus your code will be more maintainable!

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Do you mean more maintainable because braces affect variable scope? –  JYelton Sep 14 '10 at 17:36
2  
@JYelton, not quite. More maintainable because if you later want to add a line there or remove it for debugging or something, the braces are already there, and you don't risk forgetting them and wasting hours debugging it. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Sep 14 '10 at 17:40
    
@Martinho Fernandes: I've had such situations occur; definitely a good reason to always use braces. –  JYelton Sep 14 '10 at 17:47
1  
It's impossible to forget them unless you're using Notepad or something. The VS editor prevents this error. –  Steven Sudit Sep 14 '10 at 18:34

Like my C instructor told me over 10 years ago: Always, always, always use the braces. Odds are good someone is going to come along (possibly even you) and throw in another line of code, then wonder why it's not behaving correctly.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, a good rule for C, yet it doesn't apply to C#. –  Steven Sudit Sep 14 '10 at 18:35
    
Really? It's served me well since c# first came out. Why would you say it doesn't apply? –  monkeymindllc Sep 15 '10 at 12:43

I like being downvoted when I'm wrong, so I'm going to make an answer out of this...

Here's how I would format it:

using (Resource1 res1 = new Resource1())
using (Resource2 res2 = new Resource2())
using (Resource3 res3 = new Resource3())
  DoStuffWithResources(res1, res2, res3);

If I were to replace DoStuffWithResources with multiple statements, I would make use braces. However, my editor prevents me from ever making the following mistake:

using (Resource1 res1 = new Resource1())
using (Resource2 res2 = new Resource2())
using (Resource3 res3 = new Resource3())
  DoStuffWithResources(res1, res2, res3);
  DoOtherStuffWithResources(res1, res2, res3);

When I try to enter the above, I immediately get:

using (Resource1 res1 = new Resource1())
using (Resource2 res2 = new Resource2())
using (Resource3 res3 = new Resource3())
  DoStuffWithResources(res1, res2, res3);
DoOtherStuffWithResources(res1, res2, res3);

Pro tip: A downvote is not a counterargument, so if you don't have one, you shouldn't be voting.

share|improve this answer
    
My argument for using braces isn't because of what I might do, it is the next person that comes in that I do not trust. Much like driving on a snowy road in winter - I know that I can take care of myself, it is everyone else driving that scares the living hell out of me. Point given, you will recognize that the second isn't indented - but how about the Jr. that gets brought in to do defect work? –  joseph.ferris Sep 14 '10 at 18:39
    
The next person is also using the VS editor, so the same thing prevents them from accidentally creating that second code block. If you're in a typical shop, code will be reviewed prior to being released or put into production. As part of code review, I always Format Document to ensure that nothing changes. –  Steven Sudit Sep 14 '10 at 18:41
    
@Steven, code will be reviewed? I wish! If only the LOB saw such matters as clearly as programmers do. –  Anthony Pegram Sep 14 '10 at 19:05
    
@Anthony: It's actually fine if you downvoted -- you're allowed to be wrong. All I ask is that people offer a counterargument as opposed to a thumb. Your argument seems to be that some shops don't do code reviews. Sadly, you're right that these exist. However, you're also right in your implication that they suffer for this. Not much point talking about the benefits of one formatting over another if, in the end, you can get away with murder. –  Steven Sudit Sep 14 '10 at 19:07
    
It turned out that I did downvote but didn't mean to. But on code reviews, I'm doing work on a team for a rather large financial company. The LOB is paying for enhancements. We (meaning the grunts) all agree that code reviews would be nice. Refactoring obscenely long methods would be wonderful. (And I do mean obscenely long.) It would be so much better for the LOB in the long run. They don't care about the long run, they care about the next release. But don't mind me, I'm basically just venting now. –  Anthony Pegram Sep 14 '10 at 19:13

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