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Is it good practice to use "return false;" to basically say do nothing in an if statement? For example:

if (navigator.userAgent.match(/iPad/i) != null) {
    return false;
} else {
    //Usual script here
}

just wondering if there are any downfalls to this. I can use the if statement without the else but i'm just wanting to get insight on this. I have a plugin that i do not want running on iPad and so I'm wrapping it in the conditional. any comments would be appreciated!

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@user234694 - Please indent lines of code by four spaces, or they will not be formatted as code. –  Peter Ajtai Sep 14 '10 at 17:32
    
Better start to mark answers or no one will answer your questions in the future. With your username of random numbers, I am guessing you do not care. –  epascarello Sep 18 '10 at 12:18
    
Thanks for the pointer. How do I mark my answers and what does that really mean? –  designerdre101 Sep 20 '10 at 14:59

6 Answers 6

In my experience only if you were actually looking for the false to be returned.

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In other words, if you want to "do nothing", it's better to actually "do nothing" than to "get out of here and tell them it is false". When "doing nothing" it's also good to make it explicit you're "doing nothing" and not just "forgetting to put code in" with something like // Do nothing –  R. Martinho Fernandes Sep 14 '10 at 17:53
    
Thanks for the info this certainly helped me gain the insight I'm looking for. –  designerdre101 Sep 15 '10 at 19:12

You should only return a value if a caller is going to do something with that value. If you want to do "nothing" in an if statement, it's a sign that your logic is wrong. Change your statement to this:

if (navigator.userAgent.match(/iPad/i) == null) {
    //Usual script here
}

This way you don't need to "break" out of your function with the return (not a good practice in this scenario).

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I actually prefer to "do nothing" in an if statement sometimes to make my code look cleaner (instead of indenting further). –  palswim Sep 14 '10 at 17:40
3  
I don't get that though. Why have if(condition) {} else { //do something } when you can have if(!condition) { //do something } –  Vivin Paliath Sep 14 '10 at 17:51
    
It's never with a single else, but more like if(!condition) {} else if(condition 2) { /* Do something */ } else { /* Do something else */ } instead of if(condition) { if(condition 2) { /* Do something */ } else { /* Do something else */ } }. It makes my code use less indentation, and I figure a compiler will optimize that however it sees fit. –  palswim Sep 14 '10 at 19:41
    
I prefer indentation over empty if blocks. That speaks of a problem with logic to me :) –  Vivin Paliath Sep 15 '10 at 16:12
    
Thanks for the info this certainly helped me gain the insight I'm looking for. –  designerdre101 Sep 15 '10 at 19:11

You can actually simplify it further, like this:

if (navigator.userAgent.match(/iPad/i) != null) return false;
//Usual script here

Is it "good practice"...sure, if it works for you and your team. Jumping out of a function as soon as you have nothing more to do there is a very efficient way to do things, as long as it's easy to understand and maintain for whoever is working on it.

Whether you want false specifically depends on the situation, for example if you want to return but not prevent other event handlers from running later, you may want return true; instead.

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Thanks for the info this certainly helped me gain the insight I'm looking for. –  designerdre101 Sep 15 '10 at 19:11

Group 1 will say it is horrible practice since it is hard to follow.

Group 2 will say do it.

Group 3 will say do it, but in 1 line

Group 4 will say do not use the else

Group 5 will say to do not use the return, just use the if around the code you want to run. AKA:

if (navigator.userAgent.match(/iPad/i) === null) {
    //Usual script here
}
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11  
What happens if all 5 groups walk into a bar? –  Peter Ajtai Sep 14 '10 at 17:42
    
You'd have one heck of a fight. Bud Spencer style! –  cwap Sep 14 '10 at 17:51
2  
Group 6 will say you're not using the correct bracing style –  Stephen P Sep 14 '10 at 18:19
    
Group 2 will start the fight and loose because they are inefficiently coded and punchGeek() ran a stack overflow. –  landed Mar 25 at 9:57

I agree with snkmchnb, otherwise just negate the condition. You can negate long expression using these:

!(a && b) = !a || !b
!(a || b) = !a && !b

And use these several times to get what you want. For example, negating a long expression

!( (a && b || c) && (d || e) || f) =
    !((a && b || c) && (d || e)) && !f =
    (!(a && b || c) || !(d || e)) && !f =
    (!(a && b) && !c || !d && !e) && !f =
    ((!a || !b) && !c || !d && !e) && !f

This looks ugly now, but negating most times doesn't mean over-complicating. For example negating "<=" results in ">"

So never use !(long_expression) neither:

if (long expression)
{
}
else
{
  //do stuff here
}
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For reference, these are called the DeMorgan laws (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/De_Morgan's_laws). And you have a typo in the second law: you want bangs, not pipes. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Sep 14 '10 at 17:46
    
@Martinho - bangs? --- oh you mean exclamation marks... not s? ==> ! –  Peter Ajtai Sep 14 '10 at 17:50
    
@Martinho Fernandes right, thx –  SinistraD Sep 14 '10 at 17:51
    
Thanks for the info this certainly helped me gain the insight I'm looking for. –  designerdre101 Sep 15 '10 at 19:11

firstly it is very good practise, take this example

var window.__page_loaded__;
var Loadpage = function ()
{
    if(window.__page_loaded__ != undefined)
    {
         return; //The page has already laoded
    }

    //Proceed to load the page
}

by using the return; you doing the same as you would with an else statement but without the extra block, and as Loadpage() would normally not return any data its perfectly fine to short cut your code.

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Thanks for the info this certainly helped me gain the insight I'm looking for. –  designerdre101 Sep 15 '10 at 19:10

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