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How can I free up memory in a pointer vector? Here's the code:

class A
{
    private:
        int x,y,z;
    public:
        A(param1, param2, param3)
        {
            x=param1;
            y=param2;
            z=param3;
        }
        ~A()
        {
            //prompts an alertbox, warning me about the successful call of the destructor;
        }
};

...
vector<A*> list;
list.push_back(new A(1,2,3));

list.erase(list.begin()+index);//SHOULD delete the object from the memory;
list.clear();

I found out that .erase() doesn't free up memory, neither calls the destructor; I tried to use delete on every list entry with an iteration, but crashes after one iteration. Already checked if the list entry was already NULL, to avoid any error. Am I missing something? Also, I must use only STL, don't need Boost.

share|improve this question
    
Note that calling delete on a NULL pointer is safe. –  Oliver Charlesworth Sep 14 '10 at 18:07
4  
You might want to use a boost::ptr_vector from the Boost Ptr Container library instead. –  Billy ONeal Sep 14 '10 at 18:14
3  
why using A* when plain A would do ? –  Matthieu M. Sep 14 '10 at 19:01
    
@Matthieu: because the compiler (latest version of MinGW) starts shouting errors everywhere...if i try something like <code>vector<A> list; list.push_back(object); </code> gives me a "no matching function" error. –  Tibor Sep 15 '10 at 10:24
    
try std::vector<A> list; list.push_back(A(1,2,3));, you can't assign a pointer to A to a plain A, but were you to shy from pointers completely, there would be no issue. By the way code is formatted using backticks ` (one before, one after). –  Matthieu M. Sep 15 '10 at 11:32

6 Answers 6

list.erase will deallocate the memory for its member elements (and call their destructors, if they exist); it will not call delete on them.

A Boost shared_ptr would be the obvious way of doing this. If you don't want to use that, you're either going to write your own smart-pointer class, or iterate through list and call delete on each pointer before calling erase. You can do this neatly with something like:

void my_delete(A *p)
{
    delete p;
}

...

std::for_each(list.begin(), list.end(), my_delete);
share|improve this answer
3  
+1: Always, always, use smart pointers unless you really know what you're doing. –  Puppy Sep 14 '10 at 18:08
1  
@DeadMG, yeah tell me more about cyclic dependencies with shared_ptr :-) –  user405725 Sep 14 '10 at 18:12
3  
@Oli, shared_ptr is definitely not the obvious way as there is no intent to actually share these objects. std::unique_ptr from C++0x, boost's ptr_vector or in the worse case - intrusive ptr seems to be more obvious choices. –  user405725 Sep 14 '10 at 18:16
1  
@Vlad: Yes, because a vector of dynamically allocated objects is not exception safe, and results in leaks whenever you try to use a remove-like algorithm on that container. More importantly, DeadMG didn't say shared_ptr, he said a smart pointer of any description. Unique_ptr is probably the best solution, but it is not possible until C++ 0x, so we really cannot consider it here. –  Billy ONeal Sep 14 '10 at 18:19
1  
@Billy: who said in the current standard ? The OP asked not to use boost but didn't say anything about its compiler version or the STL she used. –  Matthieu M. Sep 14 '10 at 19:04
for( std::vector<A*>::iterator i = list.begin(), endI = list.end(); i != endI; ++i)
{
   delete *i;
}
list.clear();

or, using new lambda functions

std::for_each( list.begin(), list.end(), []( A* element) { delete element; });
list.clear();
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for answering the question The Way It Was Meant To Be Answered. –  rubenvb Sep 14 '10 at 18:49
    
I wish it was working...it gives me the same errors as before. –  Tibor Sep 15 '10 at 10:26
    
I don't know where it can crash, but I am almost certain that it is not in the for_each loop. Maybe you are accessing some of the deleted objects after destruction, which will definetly provoke a crash. –  Cătălin Pitiș Sep 15 '10 at 11:38

erase only erases what's in the vector (the pointers) without doing anything about what they might point at.

If you want what the point at deleted, you need to handle that yourself.

My advice would be to avoid handling any of this yourself, and consider using Boost ptr_vector instead.

share|improve this answer
1  
Even though the OP asked not to use boost, I still prefer this answer. Programming in C++ without Boost is like climbing with an arm tied in the back: possible, but stupid. –  Matthieu M. Sep 14 '10 at 19:07

Upon destruction, an STL container will destroy the objects it contains. If those objects are pointers, then it will destroy the pointers. For naked, dumb pointers, this will not delete the objects they point to. That's why it is usually best to use smart pointers for that. Smart pointers will delete the objects they refer to upon deletion; std::shared_ptr keeps track of copying pointers and how many references to a given object exist, and will only delete the object when the last pointer dies. This is always a good first candidate when looking for a suiting smart pointer. Your container would then be declared like this: std::vector< std::shared_ptr<A> >

However, your compiler/std lib might not come with std::shared_ptr, which is a feature of the next C++ standard, generally expected next year. It might, however, come with std::tr1::shared_ptr, which is a TR1 feature from 2003. (If all else fails, boost has boost_shared_ptr, but you already ruled out boost.)

You can manually manage dynamically allocated objects in STL containers, but it's a burden and prone to errors. For example, you must prevent functions from returning early (before the manual cleanup) through return statements or exceptions, and you must watch out for copy operations on containers. (Otherwise two containers would have pointers referring to the same objects, which you might then try to destroy twice.)
Manually managing resources is a PITA, prone to errors, and best avoided.

share|improve this answer

The code you have posted is not legitimate C++. Plus, erase does not delete objects you have allocated, it only erases contents of the vector, which in your case are pointers. The actual objects that you have allocated are not being deleted. Here is a correct way of doing what you want:

#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>

class A
{
    int x,y,z;

public:
    A (int param1, int param2, int param3) :
        x (param1), y (param2), z (param3)
    {
    }
};

struct Deleter
{
    template <typename T>
    void operator () (T *obj) const
    {
        delete obj;
    }
};

int
main ()
{
    std::vector<A*> list;

    list.push_back (new A (1, 2, 3));
    list.push_back (new A (4, 5, 6));
    list.push_back (new A (7, 8, 9));

    std::for_each (list.begin (), list.end (), Deleter ());
    list.clear ();
}

You may also look at Boost Ptr Container library that solves this problem in a safe and reusable manner. In C++0x, there is a std::unique_ptr template class that supports movable semantics and can be used with STL containers and algorithms to clean up memory automatically.

share|improve this answer
for(size_t i = 0; i < list.size(); ++i)
{
    delete list[i];
}

list.clear();

If your make something like this and your code crashes, post exact code and crash information.

share|improve this answer
    
Using iterators here will be more efficient and container independent (i.e. u can later switch to list w/o random access support). –  user405725 Sep 14 '10 at 18:24

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