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I would like to have a TSQL Statement to move Name Suffix (Jr, Sr., IV, etc) into another field.

The suffixes I see are JR SR I II III IV V

Here is a sample of the data

LastName
BRUNNING, II
BURCH II
BUSS, JR.
CANI III
CHRISTIAN,SR
COLVIN Jr
COWHERD,JR.

I would like the suffix moved out of the LastName field into another field called Suffix.

LastName   Suffix  
BRUNNING   II
BURCH      I     
BUSS       JR
CANI       III
CHRISTIAN  SR
COLVIN     JR
COWHERD    JR

I am using SQL Server 2005 and can use SQL# functions.
Any help would be greatly appretiated.

share|improve this question
1  
What if you have "DUNCAN SMITH SR" (real UK politician) or "CHOLMONDELY-SMYTHE III"? AKA what is the range of separators between LastName and Suffix? –  gbn Sep 14 '10 at 18:58
    
Space and Comma are the seperator. You can have spaces in the name too such as "DUNCAN SMITH SR". I notice names like "ST. THOMAS JR" –  Gerhard Weiss Sep 14 '10 at 19:06
    
gbn Thanks for editing the post and adding tag sql-server. Could you also add tag sql#? I could not add it because I needed to have a 1500 reputation to add tags. –  Gerhard Weiss Sep 14 '10 at 19:14

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can probably do better than this using the SQL# functions, but in straight T-SQL, here you go.

The main idea here is to parse out the last segment/token in the name using REVERSE and PATINDEX, and then match it to a list of known suffixes.

First some test data:

IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#names') IS NOT NULL DROP TABLE #names
IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#suffixes') IS NOT NULL DROP TABLE #suffixes
CREATE TABLE #names (name VARCHAR(32))
CREATE TABLE #suffixes (suffix VARCHAR(32))
GO

INSERT #names VALUES ('BRUNNING, II' )
INSERT #names VALUES ('BURCH II'     )
INSERT #names VALUES ('BUSS, JR.'    )
INSERT #names VALUES ('CANI III'     )
INSERT #names VALUES ('CHRISTIAN,SR' )
INSERT #names VALUES ('COLVIN Jr'    )
INSERT #names VALUES ('COWHERD,JR.'  )
INSERT #names VALUES ('BILLY BOB'    )
INSERT #names VALUES ('JOHNNY'       )

INSERT #suffixes VALUES ('II' )
INSERT #suffixes VALUES ('III')
INSERT #suffixes VALUES ('JR' )
INSERT #suffixes VALUES ('SR' )

Then, an inline SELECT version. Notice the use of NULLIF to control for SUBSTRING errors.

SELECT
  name
, left_segments 
, right_segment
, new_name = CASE WHEN b.suffix IS NOT NULL THEN a.left_segments ELSE a.name END
, b.suffix
FROM (
  SELECT 
    name
  , left_segments = CASE WHEN left_segments LIKE '%[ ,]' THEN LEFT(left_segments,LEN(left_segments)-1) ELSE left_segments END
  , right_segment = CASE WHEN right_segment LIKE '%[.]' THEN LEFT(right_segment,LEN(right_segment)-1) ELSE right_segment END
  FROM (
    SELECT * 
    , left_segments = RTRIM(LEFT(RTRIM(name),LEN(name)-NULLIF(PATINDEX('%[ ,]%',REVERSE(RTRIM(name))),0)))
    , right_segment = RIGHT(RTRIM(name),NULLIF(PATINDEX('%[ ,]%',REVERSE(RTRIM(name))),0)-1)
    FROM #names
    ) a
  ) a
LEFT JOIN #suffixes b ON a.right_segment = b.suffix

Alternately, UPDATE w/ local vars:

ALTER TABLE #names ADD 
  left_segments VARCHAR(64)
, right_segment VARCHAR(64)
GO

DECLARE 
  @name VARCHAR(64)
, @len INT
, @last_delim INT
, @left_segments VARCHAR(64)
, @right_segment VARCHAR(64)

UPDATE #names SET 
  @name           = RTRIM(name)
, @len            = LEN(@name)
, @last_delim     = @len-NULLIF(PATINDEX('%[ ,]%',REVERSE(@name)),0)
, @left_segments  = RTRIM(LEFT(@name,@last_delim))
, @right_segment  = RIGHT(@name,@len-@last_delim-1)
, @left_segments  = CASE WHEN @left_segments LIKE '%[ ,]' THEN LEFT(@left_segments,LEN(@left_segments)-1) ELSE @left_segments END
, @right_segment  = CASE WHEN @right_segment LIKE '%[.]'  THEN LEFT(@right_segment,LEN(@right_segment)-1) ELSE @right_segment END
, left_segments   = @left_segments
, right_segment   = @right_segment

SELECT a.*
, new_name = CASE WHEN b.suffix IS NOT NULL THEN a.left_segments ELSE a.name END
, suffix = b.suffix
FROM #names a LEFT JOIN #suffixes b ON a.right_segment = b.suffix

The inline SELECT is fairly convenient, but difficult to read and troubleshoot. I prefer the UPDATE with local vars for anything I might have to return to later. Plus, it makes individual edits easier to apply.

EDIT, SELECT method, slightly edited, and wrapped in an inline table-valued function. A inline TVF should be more efficient than a scalar UDF, and you get multiple return values to boot.

CREATE FUNCTION dbo.ParseNameAndSuffix (@name VARCHAR(64), @ValidSuffixes VARCHAR(512))
RETURNS TABLE AS RETURN (
  SELECT
    left_segments 
  , right_segment
  , new_name = CASE WHEN CHARINDEX(';'+right_segment+';',';'+@ValidSuffixes+';') > 0 THEN a.left_segments ELSE a.name END
  , suffix   = CASE WHEN CHARINDEX(';'+right_segment+';',';'+@ValidSuffixes+';') > 0 THEN a.right_segment END
  FROM (
    SELECT 
      name
    , left_segments = CASE WHEN left_segments LIKE '%[ ,]' THEN LEFT(left_segments,LEN(left_segments)-1) ELSE left_segments END
    , right_segment = CASE WHEN right_segment LIKE '%[.]' THEN LEFT(right_segment,LEN(right_segment)-1) ELSE right_segment END
    FROM (
      SELECT name
      , left_segments = RTRIM(LEFT(name,LEN(name)-NULLIF(PATINDEX('%[ ,]%',REVERSE(name)),0)))
      , right_segment = RIGHT(name,NULLIF(PATINDEX('%[ ,]%',REVERSE(name)),0)-1)
      FROM (SELECT name = LTRIM(RTRIM(@name))) a
      ) a
    ) a
  )
GO

SELECT * FROM #names a
CROSS APPLY dbo.ParseNameAndSuffix(a.name,'II;III;JR;SR') b
share|improve this answer
    
This is outstanding! One last request if you are able to do this. Would it make sense to have this as a FUNCTION too? I am assuming you would just modify the SELECT version name ParseLastName with the In being the LastName and the Out being NewLastName and the Suffix. I know for readability it would be much nicer. –  Gerhard Weiss Sep 14 '10 at 21:14
1  
Very good idea. I've wrapped it in a inline TVF. Readability, performance, and multiple return values all in one. –  Peter Radocchia Sep 14 '10 at 21:36
    
You da man Peter!!! –  Gerhard Weiss Sep 15 '10 at 14:03

Off the top of my head, since you've got a small number of replacements, you could do something like this:

UPDATE [TableName] SET LastName = SUBSTRING(LastName,0, CHARINDEX(lastname,'III')), SUFFIX = 'III' WHERE CHARINDEX(lastname,'III') > 0;

share|improve this answer

You might want to do some pre-processing to make the formats more consistent.

Consider removing the ending period and replacing all commas with a space. After that, your sample should look like:

LastName
BRUNNING  II
BURCH II
BUSS  JR
CANI III
CHRISTIAN SR
COLVIN Jr
COWHERD JR

Then you can identify rows ending in ' I',' II',' III',' JR', and ' SR' and strip their suffix according to its length and update the Suffix field with the value you want.

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If CLR is not an option then what Peter suggested is great. However, since you said that you have SQL# then you can do this in a simpler and more functional manner using the RegEx_MatchSimple function in SQL#. I will explain using Peter's example as the starting point.

We can set up the test using nearly the same SQL that Peter used but in this case I will create the Suffixes table as a real (non-Temp) table so that I can reference it in one of the example TVFs below. Maybe you might want to keep them in a table as opposed to passing in as a parameter, but I will show both styles. I also added two names to the #Names table to show how using RegEx can help capture variations in the data (extra spaces and/or commas):

USE [tempdb]
GO
IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#Names') IS NOT NULL DROP TABLE #Names
IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb.dbo.Suffixes') IS NOT NULL DROP TABLE dbo.Suffixes
CREATE TABLE #Names (LastName VARCHAR(32))
CREATE TABLE dbo.Suffixes (Suffix VARCHAR(32))
GO

INSERT #Names VALUES ('BRUNNING, II'  )
INSERT #Names VALUES ('BURCH II'      )
INSERT #Names VALUES ('BUSS, JR.'     )
INSERT #Names VALUES ('CANI III'      )
INSERT #Names VALUES ('CHRISTIAN,SR'  )
INSERT #Names VALUES ('COLVIN Jr'     )
INSERT #Names VALUES ('COWHERD,JR.'   )
INSERT #Names VALUES ('BILLY BOB'     )
INSERT #Names VALUES ('JOHNNY'        )
INSERT #Names VALUES ('BRUNNING, II ' )
INSERT #Names VALUES ('SMITH ,, SR. ' )

INSERT dbo.Suffixes VALUES ('II' )
INSERT dbo.Suffixes VALUES ('III')
INSERT dbo.Suffixes VALUES ('JR' )
INSERT dbo.Suffixes VALUES ('SR' )

The first thing to show is a simple example of it working with the above data. In this case I use a CTE to generate the list of matches against the names and then filter out the rows that did not match anything. I enclosed the [FullMatch] field in colons so it would be easier to see the leading and trailing spaces being captured:

;WITH cte AS (
    SELECT  names.LastName,
            [SQL#].[SQL#].RegEx_MatchSimple(names.LastName, '(([ ]*,+[ ]*)|([ ]+))' + suff.Suffix + '[.]*[ ]*$', 1, 'IgnoreCase') AS [FullMatch],
            suff.suffix
    FROM    #Names names
    CROSS JOIN tempdb.dbo.Suffixes suff
)
SELECT  cte.LastName, ':' + cte.FullMatch + ':' AS [FullMatch], REPLACE(cte.LastName, cte.FullMatch, '') AS [Replacement], cte.Suffix
FROM    cte
WHERE   cte.FullMatch <> ''

You can carry this theory over to a direct UPDATE statement:

;WITH cte AS (
    SELECT  names.LastName,
            [SQL#].[SQL#].RegEx_MatchSimple(names.LastName, '(([ ]*,+[ ]*)|([ ]+))' + suff.Suffix + '[.]*[ ]*$', 1, 'IgnoreCase') AS [FullMatch],
            suff.Suffix
    FROM    MyTable names
    CROSS JOIN NameSuffixes suff
)
UPDATE  mt
SET     mt.LastName = REPLACE(cte.LastName, cte.FullMatch, ''),
        mt.NameSuffix = cte.Suffix
FROM    MyTable mt
INNER JOIN  cte
        ON  cte.LastName = mt.LastName
WHERE   cte.FullMatch <> ''

You had requested this as a function so that is as follows:

CREATE FUNCTION dbo.ParseNameAndSuffix (@Name VARCHAR(64))
RETURNS TABLE AS RETURN
(
    WITH cte AS (
        SELECT  @Name AS [LastName],
                [SQL#].[SQL#].RegEx_MatchSimple(@Name, '(([ ]*,+[ ]*)|([ ]+))' + suff.Suffix + '[.]*[ ]*$', 1, 'IgnoreCase') AS [FullMatch],
                suff.Suffix
        FROM    tempdb.dbo.Suffixes suff
    )
    SELECT  cte.LastName, cte.FullMatch, REPLACE(cte.LastName, cte.FullMatch, '') AS [Replacement], cte.Suffix
    FROM    cte
    WHERE   cte.FullMatch <> ''
)
GO

And can be used like so:

SELECT  *   
FROM    #Names a
CROSS APPLY dbo.ParseNameAndSuffix(a.LastName) b

-- or --

UPDATE  mt
SET     mt.LastName = REPLACE(parse.LastName, parse.Found, ''),
        mt.NameSuffix = parse.Suffix
FROM    MyTable mt
CROSS APPLY dbo.ParseNameAndSuffix(mt.LastName) parse

To more closely match the example given by Peter that passed in the suffixes as a parameter, that can be done as follows using the String_Split function in SQL#:

CREATE FUNCTION dbo.ParseNameAndSuffix2 (@Name VARCHAR(64), @Suffixes VARCHAR(MAX))
RETURNS TABLE AS RETURN
(
    WITH cte AS (
        SELECT  @Name AS [LastName],
                [SQL#].[SQL#].RegEx_MatchSimple(@Name, '(([ ]*,+[ ]*)|([ ]+))' + suff.Val + '[.]*[ ]*$', 1, 'IgnoreCase') AS [FullMatch],
                suff.Val AS [Suffix]
        FROM    [SQL#].[SQL#].String_Split(@Suffixes, ';', 2) suff
    )
    SELECT  cte.LastName, cte.FullMatch, REPLACE(cte.LastName, cte.FullMatch, '') AS [Replacement], cte.Suffix
    FROM    cte
    WHERE   cte.FullMatch <> ''
)
GO

which can then be used as follows:

SELECT * FROM #Names a
CROSS APPLY dbo.ParseNameAndSuffix2(a.LastName, 'II;III;JR;SR') b

-- or --

UPDATE  mt
SET     mt.LastName = REPLACE(parse.LastName, parse.Found, ''),
        mt.NameSuffix = parse.Suffix
FROM    MyTable mt
CROSS APPLY dbo.ParseNameAndSuffix2(mt.LastName, 'II;III;JR;SR') parse
share|improve this answer

I think your best bet is going to be a RegEx match for the last word (excluding punctuation marks) being in a list (JR, Sr, III, etc)

Check out this blog

http://blogs.msdn.com/b/khen1234/archive/2005/05/11/416392.aspx

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your reply. I am also looking for the TSQL. –  Gerhard Weiss Sep 14 '10 at 19:08

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